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OSS

Why enterprises embrace open source

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OSS

The state of affairs of enterprise IT is changing quickly. Open source will become a much higher percentage of every IT organization’s environment, given its advantages in terms of cost, control, and innovation. Likewise, open source skills will soon become a critical requirement, both for using open source wisely, but also in attracting the kind of talent necessary to compete in a Third Platform world.

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Fotoxx 15.06 Open Source Photo Editor Released with New Tools and Many Improvements

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GNU
Linux
OSS

kornelix has just released a new version of its Fotoxx open source and free photo and image editing and collection management software for GNU/Linux operating systems.

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UW students use open source mapping to aid relief efforts in Nepal

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OSS

Half a world away, University of Washington civil and envi­ron­men­tal engi­neer­ing stu­dents trace the out­lines of roads, paths and build­ings in Nepal from their lap­tops.

Using open data soft­ware Open­StreetMap, the students in assistant professor Jes­sica Kamin­sky’s Civil Engi­neer­ing in Devel­op­ing Com­mu­ni­ties class joined an online com­mu­nity effort to turn satel­lite imagery of Nepal into maps and aid the earth­quake relief effort. These dig­i­tized maps provide emer­gency respon­ders and relief coordinators responding to the 7.8 magnitude earthquake and powerful aftershocks in Nepal with crit­i­cal data to guide teams deployed on the ground.

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How to Make Money from Open Source Platforms, Part 3: Creating a Product

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OSS
HowTos

What is the value of an open source platform? Would someone ever pay for it outright? Indeed, how does someone use an open source platform? Let’s start with the oldest and most significant of open source platforms, Linux. For the longest time, Linux was dismissed as a non-viable data center technology for “enterprise-grade” or “business critical” operations because it had no support model, no applications that ran on it and no obvious way to make money from it. How, then, did Linux become the engine that fueled the growth of the world’s open source ecosystem, an ecosystem that could be valued in the trillions of dollars, when calculating the percentage of the world’s economy that relies on open source systems? Was it just a bunch of hippies sharing the software and singing about it, or were there clear business reasons paving the way to its eventual victory?

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Leftovers: OSS

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OSS
  • Goodbye, SourceForge.

    ourceForge, once a trustworthy source code hosting site, started to place misleading ads (like fake download buttons) a few years ago. They are also bundling third-party adware/malware directly with their Windows installer.

  • SourceForge Accused of Bundling GIMP with Adware

    If you’ve downloaded a copy of GIMP for Windows from SourceForge in recent days, you may want to double check to make sure you didn’t get other programs installed as well. Some copies of the “open source Photoshop” were apparently being offered with for-profit adware bundled with the installer.

  • Now, open-source platform emojidex offers emojis as service

    Washington: Now, a new project, named emojidex, is offering emojis as a service that allows developers to share new emojis with each other and add them to their apps and websites.

  • Indian Wikipedia page grows to 800K page views a month

    The Odia language is spoken by more than 40 million people in the Indian state of Odisha (the 9th largest Indian state by area) and its neighboring states, as well as, the Odia diaspora living outside India. With over 5000 years of literary heritage, the Odia language has been recognized as one of the oldest South Asian languages and has been given the status of a "classical language" by the Indian government.

  • NU grad aids Nepal relief effort through open-source mapping

    When a 7.8 magnitude earthquake hit Nepal, the world wanted to help the people, but few were as well-placed as 1998 NU graduate Neil Horning, who lives in Kathmandu.

    Already well-known to the open source mapping community for a human rights mapping website called NepalMonitor.org, Horning had only to grab his laptop and make his way through the rubble to be tapped for a new assignment.

    He would be the new coordinator of Quakemap.org, born the day after the quake in a high-tech workshop called Kathmandu Living Labs.

  • Open Source Geospatial Foundation (OSGeo) Develops a Code Of Conduct

    Over the last decade there has been a gradual adoption of Code-Of-Conduct statements at events and within organisations, including at FOSS4G events and within OSGeo projects. Adopting a good Code-Of-Conduct consolidates expectations about respectful behaviour at events and forums, ensuring they are safe, welcoming and productive and helps communities discretely address indiscretions should they occur.

  • An Open Source Toolchain For iCE40 FPGAs

    FPGAs are great, but open source they are not. All the players in FPGA land have their own proprietary tools for creating bitstream files, and synthesizing the HDL of your choice for any FPGA usually means agreeing to terms and conditions that nobody reads.

  • Open-Source Cyborg Hand is Making Prosthetics More Accessible Than Ever

Why Doesn't Everyone Love Linux and Open Source?

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Linux
OSS

If Linux is so great, why has it not replaced Windows, OS X and other closed-source operating systems completely? More generally, why do people still write and develop proprietary software, if open source is a more efficient, user-oriented and secure way to code? Those are important questions about the big-picture significance and future of free and open source software, and they're worth thinking more about.

I do not mean those questions to sound pejorative, or dismissive of the idea that Linux and other open source software is actually good. Open source has distinct benefits for both users programmers and users, which make it superior in many ways to closed-source software.

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Google’s I/O 2015 Web App Released As Open Source

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Android
Google
OSS

Now that the weekend is here, the after effects of this year’s android extravaganza that is Google I/O is still being fully digested. The announcements that came through will have repercussions going forward for the rest of this year, not to mention well into next year and beyond as well. Although, this year did not as many mega announcements as there was last year, there was still quite a few notable ones on offer. A few of the big headline points included the unveiling and releasing of the developer preview of Android M, as well as the announcing and brief explanation of Google’s next mobile payment platform, Android Pay. Of course, one of the surprise hits of this year’s event was the announcement (and subsequent release) of Google’s new photo service, which is now known as Google Photos.

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OSS Leftovers

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OSS
  • GNU guru slams Windows, OS X, popular apps as malware

    Microsoft Windows and Apple's operating systems are malware because they “snoop and shackle” users, GNU creator Richard Stallman said in an opinion piece published in The Guardian.

  • 2 Geeks Invent Technology that Thwarts the NSA

    COMMUNITY CUBE is an open source initiative dedicated to protecting the privacy and security of online citizens around the world. We design, build and distribute technological solutions that protect email, web browsing, data storage and social media activity in a safe, affordable and easy to use manner.

  • A fight is brewing over ads in the 'open-source Photoshop'

    It's an accusation that SourceForge quickly refuted, with its public response titled "GIMP-Win project wasn't hijacked, just abandoned." As far as it's concerned, the project was dumped more than 18 months ago, and SourceForge charitably "stepped-in to keep this project current." The rebuttal also claims that previous concerns over misleading third-party ads were discussed and addressed well before this controversy began.

  • Considering Hadoop? Evaluate Apache Drill Along With It

    MapR Technologies, which focuses on Apache Hadoop, recently announced the general availability of Apache Drill 1.0 in the MapR Distribution. Drill, which we've covered before, delivers self-service SQL analytics without requiring pre-defined schema definitions, dramatically reducing the time required for business analysts to explore and understand data.

  • Libre Office comes to Android

    The Document Foundation has released a version of Libre Office for Android.

    The new app allows users to read and edit documents. The Document Foundation bills the app as a “Viewer” with “experimental ... basic editing capabilities, like modifying words in existing paragraphs and changing font styles such as bold and italic.”

    Viewing documents will also feel like an experiment for many users: when Vulture South tried the app it dumped us into a listing of our Galaxy S5's directories and offered no depiction of the phone's internal storage or secondary SD card. Nor does the app integrate with the cloud storage services to which we subscribe.

  • Dynamically static

    Since 26th December 2005, I’ve been runnning this blog with Wordpress. At the time there were little alternatives and finally I had got hold of a host (Dreamhost, at the time) that supported PHP and MySQL without being overly restrictive. 10 years later, things have somehow changed.

  • Trailer for Blender’s New Open Source Film ‘Cosmos Laundromat’

    The Blender Institute has unveiled the trailer for Cosmos Laundromat, an “absurdist love story” directed by Mathieu Auvray, which is the Institute’s fifth open source animated project.

  • High-amp DC Motor Control Shield for Arduino

    Anyone who has spent time with a microcomputer knows the importance of electrical power. The DC Motor Control Shield with XMC1202 for Arduino is a power controller for servos, motors, robotic actuators, and other items that need activation via a big boast of power. This shield was designed to control large motors up to 30A—yeah 30As, as in thirty amps. In case you aren’t fazed by that number, all it takes is one amp to kill you. Your car battery doesn’t put out 30 Amps.

  • PHP version 5.5.26RC1 and 5.6.10RC1

    Release Candidate versions are available in remi-test repository for Fedora and Enterprise Linux (RHEL / CentOS) to allow more people to test them. They are only available as Software Collections, for a parallel installation, perfect solution for such tests.

Save server admin time and money with these two open source solutions

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OSS

Fortunately, an open-source solution exists that does not require a monthly fee. That solution is Webmin, which, like competing closed-source products, allows users to configure and control various applications, such as the Apache HTTP Server, PHP, MySQL, Dovecot, SpamAssassin, ClamAV, and others, without needing to use command-line configuration of these disparate products.

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Why your next database will be open source

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OSS

While open source databases have long been popular for niche use cases, over the past decade they've steadily grown in maturity and importance.

In fact, as Feinberg and Adrian note, "open-source RDBMS products have matured in the availability of DBA skills, availability of DBA tools and near-equality of RDBMS functionality. OSDBMS is being used successfully in mission-critical applications in a large percentage of organizations."

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Today in Techrights

today's leftovers

  • Key Question: Is Bundling Proper?
    In both cases, bundling is either a restraint of trade or simply a wasted motion. You don’t paint a house green only to paint it red if you have any sense. The right way to do IT is to make your choice and buy/acquire what you need to accomplish your goals in the most efficient manner possible. Bundling exclusively That Other OS with all PCs was only good for an illegal monopolist and its “partners” in crime. This is not about denying businesses profits. It’s about competition in the market and freedom for users/buyers to have choice.
  • Dell Gets An Airplane Mode Switch Driver In Linux 4.2
  • Call for hosts for GUADEC 2016
    GUADEC is the biggest gathering of GNOME users and developers, which takes place in Europe every year. It includes conference days, the GNOME Foundation annual general meeting and hacking in a week of coding and discussion.
  • 4MLinux 13.0 Screencast and Screenshots
  • Tumbleweed is rolling again
    Opensuse Tumbleweed has been static since the 20150612 snapshot. But today the 20150630 snapshot was released. We are moving again.
  • openSUSE Tumbleweed net-tools vs net-tools-deprecated
  • PostgreSQL 9.5 in Debian
    The package is also waiting in NEW to be accepted for Debian experimental.
  • DUCK challenge at DebConf15
  • Upgrades to Jessie, Ruby 2.2 transition, and chef update
    Last month I started to track all the small Debian-related things that I do. My initial motivation was to be concious about how often I spend short periods of time working on Debian. Sometimes it’s during lunch breaks, weekends, first thing in the morning before regular work, after I am done for the day with regular work, or even during regular work, since I do have the chance of doing Debian work as part of my regular work occasionally. Now that I have this information, I need to do something with it. So this is probably the first of monthly updates I will post about my Debian work. Hopefully it won’t be the last.
  • Avalue debuts Braswellian COMs and an SBC
    Avalue unveiled three Linux-friendly embedded boards based on Intel’s 14nm Braswell SoCs: a Qseven COM, a COM Express Type 6 COM, and a 5.25-inch SBC.
  • Tizen In-App Purchases(IAP) for Unity Applications goes Live!
  • 5 Best Enterprise Apps and Extensions for Google Chrome
    We have already covered a lot of enterprise applications on our site before. However, one would never expect apps in this genre to exist on a browser like Google Chrome. But, nothing could be further from the real truth. Google's effort to outsmart even the biggest players in the enterprise market are gradually paying off. Slowly spreading its wings into the business world, Google is venturing into arenas where Microsoft once reigned supreme. While the competition doesn't concern us much, but what has happened, in effect, is that the rivalry is bringing out the best in both companies.
  • Platform9 Aims to Control the Private Cloud from the Cloud [Video]
  • Teaching Email Self-Defense: Campaigns intern leads a workshop at PorcFest
    My workshop on Email Self-Defense took place at the 12th annual Porcupine Freedom Festival in Lancaster, New Hampshire. Around eight people attended, which was a few more than I expected. Christopher Waid and Bob Call of ThinkPenguin joined me in helping everyone who brought a laptop to set up GnuPG properly. Those who didn't bring a laptop participated by observing the process on the system most similar to their own and asking questions about particular steps, so as to enable them to achieve the same configuration when they returned home.
  • Security advisories for Thursday

Leftovers: Software

today's howtos