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Open source meets bankers' agility demands

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Open source technology can be particularly useful in the financial and banking sectors, says Matthew Lee, regional manager for Africa at SUSE.

In the fields of banking and stock trading, agility is of critical importance, as is maintaining top performance and around-the-clock availability for the business systems that underpin trading and banking activity, Lee says.

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Leftovers: OSS

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  • Why Does the Government Use Open Source Code?
  • Twitter open-sources Diffy, a tool for automatically spotting bugs in code

    Twitter is today announcing the availability of Diffy, a new piece of open-source software that developers can use to spot bugs when they’re making updates to certain parts of code.

    Twitter uses the code internally. Now the social networking company is releasing it to the rest of the world.

  • We wrote an open source bank parser

    Our first project is something I was already working on, an extensible parser to chew bank statements and shit out transaction sheets. We made a gem, made an API and learnt a lot in the process. (We even wrote a java API to unlock pdf files given a password. Whew!). We currently have a meager three bank support, but we've managed to build a framework that makes it super easy to add other banks and statement formats.

  • Google Patches Critical Vulnerabilities in Chrome 45
  • Chrome Browser Nearing 30 Percent Market Share [Ed: Calling Microsoft-connected firm “a prominent Web analytics company”]

    It's no secret that Google Chrome and Mozilla Firefox--both open source browsers--were locked in a neck-and-neck market share battle for a long time. The two browsers have remained on rapid release cycles, and for years they tended to leapfrog each other for market share in small increments each month.

  • FossaMail Open-Source Mail Client Launches Update

    FossaMail is built on the Mozilla Thunderbird client but without all the will-they-or-won’t-they of the rumors that Mozilla has done with Thunderbird. Even better, FossaMail is compatible with both Windows and Linux, while offering a 64-bit download in Windows to up the speed, address more memory, and perform other 64-bit operations.

    At the same time, FossaMail looks and feels just like Thunderbird, despite the oval tab fiasco. It still offers a contacts list, calendar, and chat, just like most users have come to expect from their email platforms. It’s so close to Thunderbird, in fact, that the developers didn’t bother with an extensive tutorial or FAQ, but instead just point users to the Thunderbird help section if they have any problems.

  • Proprietary vs. open source WCM [Ed: pro-proprietary]

    As it turns out, open source software is not always so free, proprietary software is not necessarily closed, and help from the open source community isn’t nearly as comprehensive as the level of support you get from a professional vendor.

  • Releases 1.19.1 of Tioga and 0.13.1 of ctioga2
  • ORNL Building Efficiency Software Available as Open Source Code
  • Autotune Code from ORNL Tunes Your Building Energy Efficiency
  • ORNL Offers Automated Calibration Software for Building Efficiency Studies as Open Source Code
  • Book cover for the Free Culture book finally done

    Creating a good looking book cover proved harder than I expected. I wanted to create a cover looking similar to the original cover of the Free Culture book we are translating to Norwegian, and I wanted it in vector format for high resolution printing. But my inkscape knowledge were not nearly good enough to pull that off.

  • Hacker proves with Open Data that Microsoft license costs don’t matter

    goes against one of the arguments used more frequently to promote Free Software (which, in and by itself, is intrinsically weak, and therefore not used as the main one by the most experts) that is licensing costs. The graph clearly show that such costs (the leftmost column) are only a small part of the total. From left to right the columns show “software license costs”, “immaterial goods” (whatever that means…), “software acquisition and development”, “litigation and other legal expenses” (as much as licenses..), “software assistance and maintenance”

  • M$’s Licensing Costs Are Only The Tip Of The Iceberg Of IT – Look Below
  • There’s still a chance to save WiFi

    You may not know it, but wifi is under assault in the USA due to proposed FCC regulations about modifications to devices with modular radios. In short, it would make it illegal for vendors to sell devices with firmware that users can replace. This is of concern to everyone, because Wifi routers are notoriously buggy and insecure. It is also of special concern to amateur radio hobbyists, due to the use of these devices in the Amateur Radio Service (FCC Part 97).

Sam Varghese on Ada Initiative and Linux Australia

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  • Ada Initiative runs out of puff, shuts its doors

    This manifested itself largely in attempts to force conference organisers to adopt draconian codes of conduct. In 2013, Aurora was very much in the public eye when she forced the organisers of the Security BSides conference in San Francisco to cancel a talk that she deemed unsuitable.

    The presenter was well-known speaker Violet Blue and the talk was titled "sex +/- drugs: known vulns and exploits".

    Though Aurora tried her level best to make out that she had been asked to look over the conference programme by the organisers, it became apparent that she was the one who had poked her nose into the whole affair and tried to muscle the organisers into cancelling the talk.

  • Australian Linux conference back in the black, says Linux Australia president

    The Australian national Linux conference has not made a loss in 2015 after a disastrous 2014, according to the president of Linux Australia, Joshua Hesketh.

    Hesketh said LCA 2015, which was held in Auckland earlier his year, was expected to return to profit once the books were fully closed and audited.

Open source-distributions for Romanian public administrations

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Advocates of free and open source have tailored two Linux-distributions, motivating the country’s public administrations to use this type of software solutions. The distributions were presented on 29 August at events in Bucharest and Cluj-Napoca, the country’s most-populous cities. The Ministry of Education is the first to take an interest.

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New Cyber Threat Detection Tool Made Open Source

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Lockheed’s move points to the power of open source, particularly when it comes to big overreaching issues such as cybersecurity. Rather than Lockheed keeping their tool as internal proprietary software and requiring others to license or purchase it, they recognized the potential their innovation holds for the greater good. This represents a huge step for both the open source and cybersecurity communities.

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Five Ways Open Source Databases Are Limited

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Two of the reasons to deploy an open source database are cost and philosophy. Philosophically, the open source movement subscribes to the notion that having community-developed product creates a better product, and/or “contributes to the world in a better way.” The other reason is cost, which usually means “free,” or at least no-charge for the software database license.

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Announcing dex, an Open Source OpenID Connect Identity Provider from CoreOS

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Today we are pleased to announce a new CoreOS open source project called dex: a standards-based identity provider and authentication solution.

Just about every project requires some sort of authentication and user-management. Applications need a way for users to log-in securely from a variety of platforms such as web, mobile, CLI tools and automated systems. Developers typically use a platform-dependent solution or, just as often, find existing solutions don't quite address their needs and so they resort to writing their own solution from scratch.

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Leftovers: OSS

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  • Should I switch from OpenOffice to LibreOffice or Microsoft Office?

    [Ed: yes, it's Microsoft Jack promoting Microsoft Office again]

  • Hello, Columbus: Ohio LinuxFest Up Next Oct. 2-3

    Next up on Brother FOSS’s Traveling Salvation Show — pack up the babies and grab the old ladies and everyone go — brings the proverbial tent and revival show to Columbus, Ohio, at the beginning of next month.

  • Gandi Joins Open Source Initiative Corporate Sponsorship Program

    Sponsorship consolidates technical infrastructure and support for OSI’s web hosting and administrative systems.

  • Building efficiency software available as open source code

    A set of automated calibration techniques for tuning residential and commercial building energy efficiency software models to match measured data is now available as an open source code. The Autotune code, developed at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, is available on GitHub.

  • ORNL-Developed Building Efficiency Software Now Available
  • Project Calico: Open Source, High-Scale Network Fabric For The Cloud

    Cloud developers and operators are facing a challenge: Much of the IT toolkit that has worked well for "silo" architectures and well enough for virtual machine environments isn't a good match for apps made using containers or for microservices, where components may be not just on different machines but in many locations, and instances may come, go, or multiply. Yesterday’s "network fabric" does not accommodate this activity efficiently or reliably.

  • The True Internet of Things

    For a clear and encouraging look at where this should be going, read Phil Windley. He not only writes eloquently about the IoT, but he has been working on GPL'd open-source code for things and how they relate. To me, Phil is the Linus of IoT—or will be if people jump in and help out with the code. Whether Phil fills that role or not, nobody has more useful or insightful things to say about IoT. That's why I decided to interview him here.

  • SAP Hana Vora to Bridge Spark and Hadoop

    SAP is out to create closer connections between the worlds of Big Data and Business Intelligence. The company is embracing Spark via SAP HANA Vora, a new in-memory query engine that leverages and extends the Spark framework to produce enriched Hadoop queries and experiences.

  • VMware Integrated OpenStack 2.0 Arrives, Based on Kilo
  • Android developers can now build Chrome custom tabs into their apps

    Google released Chrome 45 for Windows, Mac, Linux, and Android yesterday, and today we’re learning that the Android update includes support for a new feature called Chrome custom tabs. You can download the new Chrome version now from Google Play, but you won’t see Chrome custom tabs right away — today’s news is primarily aimed at developers. That said, Google has partnered with a few apps already — Feedly, The Guardian, Medium,, Skyscanner, Stack Overflow, Tumblr, and Twitter will support custom tabs “in the coming weeks.”

  • FreeBSD on Beagle Bone Black (with networking)

    I set out to run FreeBSD on my Beagle Bone Black (now dubbed “smurf” by the kids on account of it’s small and blue), for network services. My DSL modem is a crappy under-configurable thing, but I don’t dare to start hacking on it directly because it runs the telephony side of things, too. So I decided to use the Beagle Bone Black to take control of my home network.

  • Ireland strengthens its Open Data strategy with a governance body and a new portal

    The Irish Government opened an ‘expression of interest’ for a new open data public body in charge of the Open Data Strategy Governance and presented a new version of the national Open Data portal.

  • Scotland released an open data resource pack

    The Scottish government has published an open data resource pack aimed at helping all local public authorities to implement their own open data plan. This resource pack has been developed to support the Open Data Strategy of Scotland.

  • Bulgarians having a date with data

    This summer, the Bulgarian Council of Ministers organised 'A Date with Data'. The theme for this one-day event was 'Open Data for Transparent Governance'. The programme featured presentations, panel discussions, demonstrations of visualisations, and other applications of open data.

  • ​SanDisk and Nexenta release open-source, flash software-defined storage array

    SanDisk is best known for storage. Led by Nithya Ruff, the company's head of open-source strategy, the company is integrating open-source into storage. In their latest deal with Nexenta, an open source software-defined storage leader, the pairing of NexentaStor with SanDisk's all-flash InfiniFlash IF100 system underlines this shift.

  • Nexenta Extends Its Global Market Leadership in Open Source-Driven Software-Defined Storage (OpenSDS) Platform with Simplified Management, Advanced Automation and Real-Time Analytic Capabilities
  • Free and open source online 3D modeling tool CraftML launches beta version

    Over the past few years we’ve noticed that portions of the 3D printing community have regularly struggled with 3D modeling software. After all, the hobby itself isn’t cheap, so do you splurge on expensive, professional tools, or do you stick to a more limited free one? And does your programming experience limit your choice, or are you willing to learn a new language for the sake of the software you found? If you’ve struggled with these issues yourself or are unhappy with your current setup, then we’ve got some good news for you: a brand new, free and open source online 3D modeling tool has just launched a beta version; called CraftML, it is especially interesting for being accessible through common web technologies including html, css and Javascript.

  • Cross-compiling a PowerPC64 LE kernel and hitting a GCC bug
  • Code ninjas earn "belts" with CoderDojo

    But where, one may ask, will we as a global workforce find the next generation of bright young programmers, hardware engineers, and system administrators? This is the problem being addressed—in part—by CoderDojo, an Ireland-based international organization of more than 700 coding clubs worldwide. By engaging young people ages 7-17 in informal, creative environments, independent clubs of youngsters can learn web and application development along with other opportunities to explore technology and learn what excites them. Volunteer adults lead the local clubs, called Dojos, and teams of mentors and helpers are working together to keep the Dojo active and healthy. The kids are usually referred to as Ninjas and can complete activities and earn belts as their skills grow, although most clubs are using color-coded USB bracelets to signify ranks.

  • Stupid RCU Tricks: Hand-over-hand traversal of linked list using SRCU

Is Office 365 really cheaper than going open source?

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The claim certainly generated plenty of headlines about the benefits of moving from OpenOffice to Office 365. However, it seems that, from the report, some of those savings are tied to the specific scenario facing the local authority in question, while others would diminish over time, as the bulk of the cost difference stems from estimates of lost productivity during years immediately after shifting to OpenOffice.

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Special Exclusive: Q&A with Joyent CEO Scott Hammond

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So far, we have utilized open source as a model to innovate quickly and engage with customers and a broad developer community. SmartOS and Node.js are open source projects we have run for a number of years. In November of last year we went all in when we open sourced two of the systems at Joyent’s core: SmartDataCenter and Manta Object Storage Service. The unifying technology beneath both SmartDataCenter and Manta is OS-based virtualization and we believe open sourcing both systems is a way to broaden the community around the systems and advance the adoption of OS-based virtualization industry-wide.

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