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OSS

New Open-Source Tool Makes it Easy to Tap Into Docker, the Cloud’s Next Big Thing

Filed under
Server
OSS

Your new app is brilliant; the code you’ve spent six months writing is beautiful. But when you upload it from your laptop to the web server, it just doesn’t work. You know why: your laptop’s is configured slightly differently than the server, and now you’re now going to have to spend hours — maybe days — figuring out what you need to change to make it run properly.

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Open source education for kids with 4 friendly puppets

Filed under
Interviews
OSS

We only use free or open source, Linux-based software for our media production. I distinguish between the two because the best video editor we found on Linux is Lightworks, which is free but not open source (yet). Our theme song was written using LMMS, our 3D animations are rendered in Blender, our graphics are all done in Inkscape and GIMP, and our stopmotion is created using Entangle and then compiled with avconv.

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OSI and Conservancy Announce US Tax Exemption Working Group

Filed under
OSS
Legal

Software Freedom Conservancy and the Open Source Initiative are pleased to announce that they are the founding members of a working group focused on tax exemption issues for organizations in the United States.

Recent activity by the Internal Revenue Service in response to applications for tax exempt status have sparked a lot of interest and discussion amongst free and open source software communities.

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How to Overcome Hidden Barriers to Open Source Adoption

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OSS

Even when procurement policies don't rule out open source solutions explicitly in this way, they often still have an unintentional bias towards proprietary software, according to Mark Johnson, development manager at OSS Watch, a body that provides advice on open source software.

"It may be that the way solutions are investigated by organizations actually favors companies that get license fees and are therefore able to offer presales support. Because the business models work differently, you may have to pay a company to come in and do a demonstration of an open source solution," Johnson says.

"What that means is that companies may need to be aware that they have to be more hands on (with open source software)," he adds. "They can't just expect to sit down and watch a PowerPoint presentation."

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Business must ‘wake up to the benefits’ of ever-growing open source software sector

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OSS

A decade ago, OpenStreetMap launched as a free, open-source alternative to the other mapping tools you may encounter on the internet. Turns out that the collaborative experiment worked exceptionally well, and thanks to a new site, you can see for yourself how the Wikipedia of mapping has covered the whole planet.

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FOSS' Documentation Dilemma

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OSS

"FOSS programming is fun -- it's rewarding," enthused Linux Rants blogger Mike Stone. "If you create something great, people recognize your name, your brilliance." Documentation, on the other hand, "is none of that. When you're doing a project for fun, it's hard to be motivated to do something that's not fun or rewarding." As a result, "FOSS documentation will always lag behind FOSS software."

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Pineapple Hacking Device Resembles a Carbon Monoxide Detector

Filed under
Software
OSS
Gadgets

The Pineapple is a small-form-factor device that runs on Linux and is loaded with tools to help enable penetration testers to gain access to the WiFi networks of their targets. The new Mark V device improves on the predecessor Mark IV device by including both the Atheros AR9331 and Realtek RTL8187 wireless chipsets.
Hardware alone isn't what makes the Pineapple really powerful; the newly updated software provides users with enhanced capabilities. With the prior releases of the Pineapple, the open-source Karma tool was one of the primary ways to trick a target into connecting to the Pineapple. In a Karma attack, the Pineapple listens in for WiFi clients that are looking for access points with which they have previously connected. So, for example, if a user has ever connected to an access point named "coffeshop," in a karma attack the Pineapple will claim to be "coffeshop" so the user will connect.

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We cannot do modern science unless it's open

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OSS

For my fellow academics, the question is: Can open source get you a job? My answer is: By itself it probably won't get you a lectureship, but all my group have been able to get good jobs in the high-tech industry, or science. I think the public exposure of the open source way has helped. I'm very proud of them.

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For The Love Of Open Mapping Data

Filed under
Interviews
OSS

It’s been exactly ten years since the launch of OpenStreetMap, the largest crowd-sourced mapping project on the Internet. The project was founded by Steve Coast when he was still a student.

It took a few years for the idea of OpenStreetMap to catch on, but today, it’s among the most heavily used sources for mapping data and the project is still going strong, with new and improved data added to it every day by volunteers as well as businesses that see the value in an open project like this.

To celebrate the project’s birthday, I sat down with Coast, who now works at Telenav, to talk about OpenStreetMap’s earliest days and its future. Here is a (lightly edited) transcript of the interview.

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Oracle Embargoes FLOSS (Java)…

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OSS
Legal

So, Oracle is pushing the limits but apparently is legally doing so. Whether FLOSS can legally be embargoed by government is beyond me. After all, the source is out there and can’t be put back in the bottle. Further, if every country in the world had a random set of embargoes against every other country in he world, FLOSS could not be international at all. That would be a crime against humanity. If Java, why not Linux, itself? If such embargoes apply, Russia, Iran, Cuba etc. could just fork everything and go it alone. They certainly have the population to support a thriving FLOSS community behind their own walls.

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    Browsing the internet has different meaning to different people. While to some the web is a source of entertainment, to others it is a valuable and source of learning. Sadly enough, the internet is not widely available and easily affordable everywhere in the globe. Slow network speed is another problem. Developer Stefan Aleksic of ColdSauce tries to find a solution in an SMS (text) based browser for the third world countries which are yet to see the internet as we know it. He has named it the Cosmos Browser. If you ever used elinks on Linux, you know how efficient and low-bandwidth text only browsing can be. Of course, it is not meant for visiting a website for downloading wallpapers, but it is more than sufficient if you want to read some information from the web. Cosmos will work on text and will not need any data plan or WiFi.
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today's howtos

Leftovers: Gaming

Sorry, Windows 9 Fans, This Is How Multiple Desktops Should Work – Video

The Linux platform has always taken pride in this cool feature. Having multiple desktops is a great way to increase the productivity and there are numerous means to implement it. Lots of Linux distributions have this option, which is used in various ways. Read more