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OSS

Open Source and Cloud Computing: Friends or Foes?

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OSS

Are open source software and the cloud good for each other?

At first glance, the question seems a little silly. After all, cloud computing and open source have both experienced surges in use to the point where nearly every company on the planet uses both. And many analysts suggest that neither one would have experienced their current level of growth without the other.

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10 open source software tools for developing IoT applications

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OSS

Initially one of the main driving forces behind this IoT revolution was the open source community whose constant experimentation, combined with accelerating technological possibilities, created many new and interesting applications. These applications range from Wi-Fi kettles to smart data analysing machines and everything in between.

CBR lists some of the best open source software tools for IoT development.

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Linux on Servers

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Server
OSS

Events: Open Networking Summit and OpenStack Summit

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OSS
  • Opening Up Virtual Reality Development with WebVR

    “Virtual reality (VR) is nothing new — people have been experimenting with it for decades. But only recently, we have come to terms with having commercial hardware like Oculus or HTC Vive to experience and enjoy VR content within our home,” says Rabimba Karanjai, a full-time graduate researcher and Mozilla contributor, who will be speaking about virtual reality development at the upcoming Open Networking Summit.

  • Helping PTG attendees and other developers get to the OpenStack Summit
  • Submitting a Talk To OpenStack Summit

    I haven’t written a post for some time now, been busy creating something very special which i hope to share about really soon. I usually write in this blog about technical things, and i will continue to do this after this post Smile but i wanted to share some of the insights i gained both from being a returning speaker and track chair in the recent OpenStack summits.

Leftovers: OSS

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OSS

Mirantis shifts again, will offer managed solutions based on open-source technologies

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OSS

Mirantis is (or, as we will see, was) known as the pure play OpenStack vendor. The company focused on offering large organizations products and services that helped them leverage the open-source, OpenStack cloud computing platform to build their own clouds for internal or external use.

Over time, however, there has been some doubt cast upon how much of a market opportunity there is for these sort of OpenStack service providers. The OpenStack ecosystem has been the source of much angst as consolidation, rationalization and unrealized hopes and dreams too their toll.

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How to grow healthy open source project infrastructures

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OSS

In 2013 I joined the OpenStack Infrastructure team. In the four years I spent with the team, I learned a considerable amount about the value of hosting an infrastructure for an open source project in the open itself.

In 2014 I gave a talk at All Things Open and was interviewed by Jason Baker about how we'd done our systems administration in the open. My involvement on this team led me to advocate for systems administrators to use revision control and learn about tools for working with a distributed team. At the OpenStack Summit in Austin in 2016, our team did a talk on navigating the open source OpenStack Infrastructure.

The leadership of the OpenStack project in the space of open source infrastructures inevitably led us to encounter other open source projects that were similarly open sourcing their entire, or portions of, the infrastructure used in their project. In February of 2016, I launched OpenSourceInfra.org to begin tracking these infrastructures. The source for this site is hosted on GitLab, and we've seen a steady increase in merge proposals to add new projects over the past several months.

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FOSS Funding

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OSS
  • GNU Toolchain now accepting donations with the support of the Free Software Foundation

    The Free Software Foundation (FSF) is now accepting donations to support the GNU Toolchain, a collection of foundational freely licensed software development tools. Many pieces of software depend upon the GNU Toolchain, including the GNU/Linux family of operating systems which runs the majority of Web servers, millions of personal devices and the most advanced supercomputers.

  • SPI Inc Ended 2016 Managing 2.48 Million USD For Open-Source Projects

    For those curious, here is how much various open-source projects have in the bank.

    SPI Inc, Software in the Public Interest, is the non-profit organization serving as the organizational steward for many open-source projects from Arch Linux and Debian to recently X.Org. SPI Inc also manages the finances for smaller projects like Drizzle, GNUstep, YafaRay, HeliOS, Fluxbox, and many others. Those that somehow never heard of SPI Inc can learn more about their efforts via SPI-Inc.org.

Linux/FOSS Events

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Linux
OSS

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

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OSS
  • Your freedoms are eroding as technology becomes more closed

    We’re not doing a good job of keeping the Internet and related technologies as open and egalitarian as they used to be, allowing a dangerous oligopoly to reemerge. How can we reverse the trend? And by we, I actually mean you.

  • Senlin for VMware Integrated OpenStack brings open source up to speed

    The Senlin clustering service delivers a one-two punch, enabling developer productivity while proving VMware's commitment to improving open source technology.

  • Open Source Couchbase Mobile Now Scales on Demand

    The open source Couchbase Mobile platform comprises: the Couchbase Lite NoSQL embedded database for mobile and Internet of Things (IoT) devices; the Couchbase Server that stores and manages data in the cloud; and the Couchbase Sync Gateway that synchronizes data between the two.

  • Inertia Slows Evolution For Open Scientists

    It is still a long way to a new generation of “open scientists”, German open data researcher Christian Heise found out in his just-published PhD thesis. Heise not only investigated drivers and barriers for what he expects to be an evolution from open access to open science by theory and a survey of over 1100 scientists. He tried the concept open science the hard way, opening up the writing of his thesis paper on the net.

  • Open Source textbooks could save students a bundle

    As the cost of college has skyrocketed, students and parents could soon get relief on expensive textbooks under the Textbook Cost Savings Act of 2017 that would provide funding to develop free open source learning materials.

    “The state is moving rapidly towards free textbooks online,” said the bill’s sponsor Sen. Jim Rosapepe, D-Prince George’s, in an interview. “If the bill passes it will be state policy that we want to move in that direction as much as possible.”

  • Mathematics for Computer Science: a free, CC-licensed MIT textbook

    This is indeed an up-to-the-minute text [PDF], dated Mar 7, 2017. It's written by Googler/MIT prof Eric Lehman, MIT/Akamai scientist F Thomson Leighton and MIT AI researcher Albert R Meyer, as a companion to their Mathematics for Computer Science open course.

  • The Open Source Toolkit – meet the Channel Editors

    The Open Source Toolkit features articles and online projects describing hardware and software that can be used in a research and/or science education setting across different fields, from basic to applied research. The Channel Editors aim to showcase how Open Source tools can lead to innovation, democratisation and increased reproducibility.

  • Vulkan 1.0.43 Adds Two New Extensions

    The Khronos Group has done a Friday evening update to the Vulkan 1.0 API specification.

    Vulkan 1.0.43 includes a number of GitHub and internal-Khronos issues around document clarifications and other minor behavior differences.

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More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

  • The Linux Migration: April 2017 Progress Report
    In December 2016, I kicked off a migration to Linux (from OS X) as my primary laptop OS. In the nearly 4 months since the initial progress report, I’ve published a series of articles providing updates on things like which Linux distribution I selected, how I’m handling running VMs on my Linux laptop, and integration with corporate collaboration systems (here, here, and here). I thought that these “along the way” posts would be sufficient to keep readers informed, but I’ve had a couple of requests in the last week about how the migration is going. This post will help answer that question by summarizing what’s happened so far. Let me start by saying that I am actively using a Linux-powered laptop as my primary laptop right now, and I have been doing so since early February. All the posts I’ve published so far have been updates of how things are going “in production,” so to speak. The following sections describe my current, active environment.
  • Galago Pro: Look Inside
    Look inside the Galago Pro and see how easy it is to upgrade!
  • Direct3D 9 Over Vulkan Continues Progressing
  • Nouveau 1.0.15 X.Org Driver Released With Pascal Support
  • Arch Linux running natively on Pixel C
  • openSUSE Conference 2017 Schedule Posted

Making GNU/Linux Look Nice

Lumina Desktop Gets lumina-mediaplayer

  • 1.3.0 Development Preview: lumina-mediaplayer
  • Lumina Desktop Gets Its Own Media Player
    There's now yet another open-source media player, but this time focused on the BSD-focused Qt-powered Lumina Desktop Environment. Lumina Media Player is one of the new additions for the upcoming Lumina 1.3. Lumina Media Player's UI is quite simple so far and allows playing of local audio/video files along with basic audio streaming -- currently implemented for Pandora.

today's howtos