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OSS

Nantes Métropole releases open source tool for LibreOffice transition

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LibO
OSS

The French city of Nantes (Nantes Métropole) has released an open source tool used to schedule its migration to LibreOffice. The shift from commercial software to the free and open source LibreOffice productivity suite started in 2013 and is intended to save the administration EUR 260 000 per year. The transition was finalised in April 2016.

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Leftovers: OSS

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OSS
  • Is The Open Source Software Movement A Technological Religion?
  • Experts weigh in on open source platforms, market

    In this Advisory Board, our experts discuss the pros and cons of open source virtualization and which platforms are giving proprietary vendors a run for their money.

  • Light a fire under Cassandra with Apache Ignite

    Apache Cassandra is a popular database for several reasons. The open source, distributed, NoSQL database has no single point of failure, so it’s well suited for high-availability applications. It supports multi-datacenter replication, allowing organizations to achieve greater resiliency by, for example, storing data across multiple Amazon Web Services availability zones. It also offers massive and linear scalability, so any number of nodes can easily be added to any Cassandra cluster in any datacenter. For these reasons, companies such as Netflix, eBay, Expedia, and several others have been using Cassandra for key parts of their businesses for many years.

  • Proprietary Election Systems: Summarily Disqualified

    Hello Open Source Software Community & U.S. Voters,

    I and the California Association of Voting Officials, represent a group of renowned computer scientists that have pioneered open source election systems, including, "one4all," New Hampshire’s Open Source Accessible Voting System (see attached). Today government organizations like NASA, the Department of Defense, and the U.S. Air Force rely on open source software for mission critical operations. I and CAVO believe voting and elections are indeed mission-critical to protect democracy and fulfill the promise of the United States of America as a representative republic.

    Since 2004, the open source community has advocated for transparent and secure—publicly owned—election systems to replace the insecure, proprietary systems most often deployed within communities. Open source options for elections systems can reduce the costs to taxpayers by as much as 50% compared to traditional proprietary options, which also eliminates vendor lock-in, or the inability of an elections office to migrate away from a solution as costs rise or quality decreases.

  • Microsoft SQL Server on Linux – YES, Linux! [Ed: Marketing and PR from IDG's "Microsoft Subnet"; This headline is a lie from Microsoft; something running on DrawBridge (proprietary Wine-like Windows layer) is not GNU/Linux]

Creative Commons News

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OSS
  • Creative Commons Is Resurrecting Palmyra

    Creative Commons launched its 2017 Global Summit today with a rather moving surprise: a seven-foot-tall 3D printed replica of the Tetrapylon from Palmyra, Syria. For those who don't know the tragic situation, Palmyra is one of the most historic cities in the world — but it is being steadily destroyed by ISIS, robbing the world of countless irreplaceable artifacts and murdering those who have tried to protect them (the folks at Extra History have a pair of good summary videos discussing the history and the current situation in the city).

    Among ISIS's human targets was Bassel Khartabil, who launched Syria's CC community several years ago and began a project to take 3D scans of the city, which CC has been gathering and releasing under a CC0 Public Domain license. He was captured and imprisoned, and for the past five years his whereabouts and status have been unknown. As the #FreeBassel campaign continues, Creative Commons is now working to bring his invaluable scans to life in the form of 3D-printed replicas, starting with today's unveiling of the Tetrapylon — which was destroyed in January along with part of a Roman theatre after ISIS captured the city for a second time.

  • Creative Commons: 1.2 billion strong and growing

    "The state of the commons is strong." The 2016 State of the Commons report, issued by Creative Commons this morning, does not begin with those words, but it could. The report shows an increase in adoption for the suite of licenses, but that is not the whole story.

HardwareX journal on open source hardware in science launched

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OSS

Scientific publishing house Elsevier has just launched the first issue of HardwareX, an open access journal on the free and open-source design, building and customising of scientific infrastructure (hardware). The journal says it is open to input from all scientific, technological and medical disciplines.

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OpenStack and Cloudera

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Server
OSS
  • OpenStack User Survey Indicates Growth in Most Sectors

    A look at the numbers released last week by the OpenStack Foundation from its ninth user survey should be of interest to anyone considering the platform as part of a cloud solution. The platform's percentage of the overall cloud market remains level, at about two-thirds of the total clouds in deployment. That in itself represents a large increase in total deployments, as cloud use continues to rise. Add to that a rapid increase in proof-of-concept and test use, and it's clear that OpenStack's place in the cloud continues to strengthen.

  • 4 types of OpenStack Neutron networks you must understand

    If your OpenStack hosted virtual instances need network connectivity you’re going to have to create a network. There are multiple kinds of networks and in order to make the right choice you will need to understand at least two very important network attributes: ‘router:external’ and ‘shared.’ Unless you know what these attributes and their combinations mean, it will be difficult to make the optimal network choice.

  • Cloudera’s IPO is overshadowed by a rival it won’t mention

    One of the original poster children of the big data software craze, Cloudera, is due for its long-awaited IPO this week. Sometime Thursday afternoon, its shares will price somewhere between $12 and $14 and will open for trading on the New York Stock Exchange the following morning, raising about $200 million in the process.

    Make no mistake, this IPO qualifies as what’s known in venture capital circles as a down round. Essentially the new investors are buying shares in a company that is worth less than it was during its prior funding rounds.

'Creative' Uses of Open Source

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OSS

Open source experts to VA: Keep VistA, it can be fixed

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OSS

While the resounding opinion is that the Department of Veterans Affairs should replace the proprietary VistA with a commercial EHR, perhaps choosing Cerner as the Defense Department did, that idea does not hold so true within the open source community.

“When you look at the big trends in the IT industry, open source is used everywhere. In fact, some of the most successful mega IT systems have a significant open source component,” said Seong Mun, CEO of the Open Source EHR Record Alliance. “We believe it’s the right methodology to get to where we need to go.”

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Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

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OSS
  • GitHub open sources OctoDNS, new tool for managing DNS records

    The frailty of the DNS system became all too evident last year, when DNS host Dyn was hit by a major Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS) attack that brought down large swaths of the internet. With the threat of DDoS attacks only expected to grow, experts urge organizations to build redundancy into their DNS services.

  • 10 Pioneers taking open source to the next level

    Open source changed the software game, introduced in the mid-1980’s but really making an impact in the late 1990’s and introducing a free, collaborative approach to software development.

  • The Future of Big Data: Distilling Less Knowledge Per Bit

    Until recently, the word data didn’t require a modifier. But we passed a watershed moment when we started referring to big data. Apparently, that wasn’t a sufficient description for some chunks of data, because people grasped for bolder terms, such as humongous data. Sadly, now, it appears that we have run out of appropriate adjectives. And yet data keeps getting bigger and bigger.

  • Ignorance of open source law is no defense [Ed: uses fear of security and licensing issues to sell its services. Proprietary software is even worse in that regard.]

    While Open Source Software (OSS) has been around for decades, commercial software companies have had their traditional software design process flipped upside down in the last 10 years. When classic commercial software packages were first created years ago, there was very little third-party compliance that was required.

  • Open source is the future of teaching

    The work of teaching in developing countries is often hindered by an absence of basic resources, a lack of infrastructure, as well as underfunding, corruption and sociopolitical instability.

    Given these realities, how can we develop teachers in a way that promotes quality education for all?

    Open education resources (OERs) are freely accessible, openly licensed materials that are available online for anyone to use in teaching and learning. They have the potential to build capacity by providing educators with direct access, at low or no cost, to ways in which they can develop their competence.

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

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OSS

FOSS Licensing (and Lack Thereof)

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OSS
Legal
  • Portugal to harmonise usability of govt portals

    All of the code, information and tools are made available for reuse.

  • JRC: ‘Releasing code without a licence hinders reuse’

    Projects that publish source code without a licence weaken the reusability of their code, warns Stefano Gentile, a copyright and trademark specialist working for the European Commission’s Joint Research Centre (JRC). Currently just 20 % of all projects published on GitHub, one of the most popular source code sharing platforms, have selected a licence for their work - down from about 60% in 2008, Gentile said, quoting numbers published in 2015 by GitHub.

  • React to React

    The Additional Grant of Patent Rights is a patent license grant that includes certain termination criteria. These termination criteria are not entirely unprecedented when you look at the history of patent license provisions in OSI-approved licenses, but they are certainly broader than the termination criteria [or the equivalent] in several familiar modern licenses (the Apache License 2.0, EPL, MPL 2.0, and GPLv3).

  • BetConstruct declares the source code for its front-end as open source

    The project is distributed under MIT license.

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More in Tux Machines

GNOME 3.25.3 Released, GTK Development

  • GNOME 3.25.3 Now Available
    GNOME 3.25.3 is now available as the latest stepping stone towards September's release of GNOME 3.26.
  • GNOME 3.26 Desktop Environment Development Continues, New Milestone Is Out Now
    Matthias Clasen has informed the community via an email announcement that the third milestone of the upcoming GNOME 3.26 desktop environment is now ready for public testing. After a one day delay, GNOME 3.25.3 is now available, and it's the third development release of the upcoming GNOME 3.26 desktop environment that could be used by default in popular GNU/Linux distributions, such as the Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) or Fedora 27, both due for release later this year. It brings a bunch of updates and new features to several of its components and apps.
  • Eight years since first release and still no usable theme?
    Well, let me be frank. Ever since gtk-3.0 I've been skeptical of it, especially of the theming aspect. In gtk-2 we had (and still have) many themes ranging from trash to excellent, almost every kind of taste could have been satisfied. Not so in gtk-3. First issue is constant changes to theming API, meaning that despite there being hundreds of themes, only handful of them actually work right :( And among them, I still have yet to find one that would work on my fairly usual 15,6″ laptop screen with 1366×768 px resolution. Basicaly I have two issues.

Microsoft Dirty Tricks and Entryism

Security: Windows Causes Chaos, Routers With Back Doors, Patching of UNIX/Linux

  • Traffic lights in Australia hit by WannaCry ransomware [Ed: Well, who uses Microsoft Windows to manage traffic?!?!]

    Radio station 3aw reports that dozens of pole based traffic calming measures are infected and that this came as a surprise to the local minister and Road Safety Camera Commissioner when radio reporters told him about it.

  • Honda shuts down factory after finding NSA-derived Wcry in its networks
    The WCry ransomware worm has struck again, this time prompting Honda Company to halt production in one of its Japan-based factories after finding infections in a broad swath of its computer networks, according to media reports. The automaker shut down its Sayama plant northwest of Tokyo on Monday after finding that WCry had affected networks across Japan, North America, Europe, China, and other regions, Reuters reported Wednesday. Discovery of the infection came on Sunday, more than five weeks after the onset of the NSA-derived ransomware worm, which struck an estimated 727,000 computers in 90 countries. The mass outbreak was quickly contained through a major stroke of good luck. A security researcher largely acting out of curiosity registered a mysterious domain name contained in the WCry code that acted as a global kill switch that immediately halted the self-replicating attack.
  • GhostHook: CyberArk finds new way to attack Windows 10

    Researchers at CyberArk Labs have discovered a new way of gaining access to the innards of Windows 10 64-bit systems that can bypass existing safeguards, including the kernel patch protection known as PatchGuard that Microsoft developed to improve system security.

  • John McAfee claims 'every router in America has been compromised' by hackers and spies

    Technology pioneer John McAfee believes that every home internet router in America is wide open to cyberattacks by criminal hackers and intelligence agencies. He makes the claim speaking after revelations from WikiLeaks that the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) targets the devices.

  • 'Stack Clash' Smashed Security Fix in Linux
    What's old is new again: an exploit protection mechanism for a known flaw in the Linux kernel has fallen to a new attack targeting an old problem.
  • Continuous defence against open source exploits
    Register for next month's expo for the public sector DevOps community to hear key speakers from the front line of public sector digital transformation and see the latest technologies at first hand. Andrew Martin, DevOps lead in a major government department, has been added to the line-up of speakers to talk about the importance of getting the approach to security right with open source software.
  • IoT goes nuclear: creating a ZigBee chain reaction [iophk: "use 6lowpan instead"]

    If plugging in an infected bulb is too much hassle, the authors also demonstrate how to take over bulbs by war-driving around in a car, or by war-flying a drone.

  • Passengers given a freight as IT glitch knocks out rail ticket machines

    The network of machines are operated by the individual franchises, but share a common infrastructure from German software company Scheidt and Bachmann.

OpenBSD Development News

  • OpenBSD now has Trapsleds to make life harder for ROPers
  • Historical: My first OpenBSD Hackathon

    I was a nobody. With some encouragement, enough liquid courage to override my imposter syndrome, and a few hours of mentoring, I'm now doing big projects. The next time you're sitting at a table with someone new to your field, ask yourself: how can you encourage them? You just might make the world better.

    Thank you Dale. And thank you Theo.

  • Finish the link-kit job
    We've had the linkkit components in the tree for a while, but it has taken nearly 20 rounds between rpe/tb/myself to get the last few bits finished. So that the link kit is cleanly used at reboot, but also fits in with the practices kernel developers follow.