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OSS

OSS in the Back End

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Server
OSS
  • What is DataOps?

    DataOps describes the creation & curation of a central data hub, repository and management zone designed to collect, collate and then onwardly distribute data such that data analytics can be more widely democratised across an entire organisation and, subsequently, more sophisticated layers of analytics can be brought to bear such as built-for-purpose analytics engines.

  • Essentials of OpenStack Administration Part 5: OpenStack Releases and Use Cases

    OpenStack has come a long way since 2010 when NASA approached Rackspace for a project. With 1,600 individual contributors to OpenStack and a six-month release cycle, there are a lot of changes and progress. This amount of change and progress is not without its drawbacks. In the Juno release, there were something like 10,000 bugs. In the next release, Kilo, there were 13,000 bugs. But as OpenStack is deployed in more environments, and more people are interested in it, the community grows both in users and developers.

  • How to find your first OpenStack job

    We’ve covered the growth of OpenStack jobs and how you can become involved in the community. Maybe that even inspired you to search for OpenStack jobs and explore the professional opportunities for Stackers. You probably have questions, so we’re here to answer the frequent questions about working on OpenStack professionally.

  • OpenStack becomes ‘de facto’ private cloud

    A mixed year for OpenStack with HPE and Cisco seeming to step away from the community.

  • OpenStack under the radar
  • Angel Diaz talks about OpenStack Interop

    At the OpenStack Summit in Barcelona, 16 vendors stood on stage and demonstrated interoperability. This was a major breakthrough for OpenStack. It marked a significant departure from just 18 months earlier when the OpenStack Foundation had chided vendors for creating lots of proprietary solutions. Enterprise Times sat down with Angel Diaz, IBM Vice President, Cloud Architecture and Technology to talk about this achievement.

  • How to take a leadership role in OpenStack

    On top of her job as a system architect at Nokia, Afek has taken an active role in the OpenStack community as the project team lead (PTL) of Vitrage and a voice in gender equality in the technology field with the Women of OpenStack. You may have also seen her taking center stage at the recent OpenStack Summit Barcelona, where she took part in a daredevil demo.

  • Landing a job, becoming the de facto private cloud, and more OpenStack news

Openwashing

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OSS

'Opening' Hardware

Filed under
Hardware
OSS
  • Open source tool for wave and tidal arrays

    Wave and tidal energy design tool DTOcean has been launched as an open source software package. The tool’s developers say it will assist project developers to design wave and tidal energy arrays by identifying optimal layouts, components and procedures.

    An active but growing user community is emerging around DTOcean, which industry and research communities are encouraged to join.

  • CES 2017: ARM gets an assist in Renault’s open-source electric vehicle, Twizy

    The open source movement has had a profound impact on the tech sector over the last two decades, and now those notions are moving beyond software and operating systems to form the basis for flexible yet standardized complete systems – including automobiles.

  • Open Source Reaches Processor Core

    Whether for budgetary, philosophical, or other reasons, an increasing number of embedded systems are being designed using open source elements. For the most part, these elements are software based, although there are some open source board designs in use as well. Now, the microcontroller that empowers a PCB design is available as an open source design.

  • 3D Printing Market to More Than Double by 2020

Min Browser Muffles the Web's Noise

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OSS
Web

Min is a Web browser with a minimal design that provides speedy operation with simple features.

When it comes to software design, "minimal" does not mean low functionality or undeveloped potential. If you like minimal distraction tools for your text editor and note-taking applications, that same comfort appeal is evident in the Min browser.

I mostly use Google Chrome, Chromium and Firefox on my desktops and laptop computers. I am well invested in their add-on functionality, so I can access all the specialty services that get me through my long sessions in researching and working online.

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WordPress, Silverstripe, TYPO3 & More: Keeping Up With Open Source CMS

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OSS

December is a traditionally quiet month across most industries, but the world of open source CMS never truly rests.

Sure, open source vendors (and their contributing communities alike) cooled their jets a little as the new year approached — but there was still plenty going on.

If you happened to miss any of it, here are the latest open source CMS headlines.

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Open source server simplifies HTTPS, security certificates

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OSS
Security

For administrators seeking an easier method to turn on HTTPS for their websites, there is Caddy, an open source web server that automatically sets up security certificates and serves sites over HTTPS by default.

Built on Go 1.7.4, Caddy is a lightweight web server that supports HTTP/2 out of the box and automatically integrates with any ACME-enabled certificate authority such as Let’s Encrypt. HTTP/2 is enabled by default when the site is served over HTTPS, and administrators using Caddy will never have to deal with expired TLS certificates for their websites, as Caddy handles the process of obtaining and deploying certificates.

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How to get started as an open source programmer

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OSS

Looking out at the world of technology is exciting. It has a lot of moving parts, and it seems the further you dig into it, the deeper it gets, and then it's turtles all the way down. For that very reason, technology is also overwhelming. Where do you start if you're keen to join in and help shape the way the modern world functions? What's the first step? What's the twentieth step?

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Game's changed in 6 years: open source ecosystem thrives

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OSS

Chen Bo, a 37-year-old software developer with Beijing-based Cheetah Mobile, remembers clearly how isolated and closed China's software environment was in 2010. That was a time when the mobile internet revolution was taking hold of the world's most populous country.

"Every app developer saw his or her software codes as the most precious assets and would never share them with others. You could say the scene was equivalent to people securing their family jewelry in plastic wraps and locking it in burglar-resistant safes," Chen said.

That was also a time when even employees were allowed access to only a part of the codes they were working on, to pre-empt information leaks to competitors.

But the scene has changed over the last six years. China has blossomed into one of the world's most dynamic hubs for software developers.

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Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

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OSS
  • Transpile And Run Python Code Into Go Program With Google’s Open Source ‘Grumpy’
  • Yelp Open-Sources Latest in Data Pipeline Project, Data Pipeline Client Library

    Services consume from the pipeline via the client library, and at Yelp feed into targets like Salesforce, RedShift and Marketo. The library reportedly handles Kafka topic names, encryption, and consumer partitioning. Centralizing service communications through a message broker while enforcing immutable schema versioning helps protect downstream consumers and is also a primary motivation behind the broader data pipeline initiative.

  • The importance of the press kit

    I'd like to share a few lessons I've learned about creating a press kit. This helped us spread the word about our recent FreeDOS 1.2 release, and it can help your open source software project to get more attention.

  • Vault CFP deadline approaching

    The Vault Storage and Filesystems conference will be held March 22 and 23 in Cambridge, MA, USA, immediately after the Linux Storage, Filesystem, and Memory-Management Summit. The call for presentations expires on January 14, and the conference organizers would really like to get a few more proposals in before then. Developers interested in speaking at a technical Linux event are encourage to sign up.

  • Firefox "Reader Mode" and NoScript

    A couple of days ago I blogged about using Firefox's "Delete Node" to make web pages more readable. In a subsequent Twitter discussion someone pointed out that if the goal is to make a web page's content clearer, Firefox's relatively new "Reader Mode" might be a better way.

  • Get your name in the relayd book

    There’s a long tradition amongst science fiction writers of selling bit parts in books in exchange for charity donations. It’s called tuckerization.

    I see no reason why science fiction writers should have all the fun.

    I need a sample user for the forthcoming book on OpenBSD’s httpd and relayd. This user gets referred to in the user authentication sections as well as on having users manage web sites. They will also get randomly called out whenever it makes sense to me.

    That sample user could be you.

    All it would cost is a donation to the OpenBSD Foundation.

  • Skateboarding and Hacking
  • Open-source plant database confirms top US bioenergy crop
  • This Renault Twizy looks a lot like Iron Man - Roadshow
  • The Eli ZERO Is The Latest Crazy Concept Nobody Wants
  • ARM Exec Dizzy for Open-Source Twizy

    With its processor cores installed in practically every automotive chip used in vision SoCs, sensor fusion ICs and secure microcontrollers, ARM, a microprocessor IP giant, has not only witnessed the automotive industry’s evolution, but has become an integral part of the story.

  • Rcpp now used by 900 CRAN packages

    Today, Rcpp passed another milestone as 900 packages on CRAN now depend on it (as measured by Depends, Imports and LinkingTo declarations). The graph is on the left depicts the growth of Rcpp usage over time.

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

Filed under
OSS
  • CyanogenMod's death and rebirth, new open source automotive group, and more news

    In this edition of our open source news roundup, we take a look at Cyanogen Inc. pulling the plug on CyanogenMod, Toyota and Ford forming the SmartDeviceLink Consortium, and more.

  • Haiku OS Gaining Ground On UEFI, FreeBSD Compatibility Layer, Remote Debugging

    For those interested in the BeOS-inspired Haiku open-source operating system, they have issued their latest monthly progress report to end out 2016.

  • Call for Presentations at LinuxFest NorthWest, May 6-7, 2017

    Freedom, Friends, Features, First. The theme of this years LinuxFest NorthWest is ‘The Mechanics of Freedom’.

    Artificial Intelligence and the Internet of Things are becoming even more integrated in the lives of regular citizens. Along with these changes comes concern over the trade-offs between convenience and privacy. For example: Privacy in the age of relentless online tracking, How bots can help you onboard new community members, Training driverless vehicles, How the Internet of Things took down DNS.

  • 2016 sees Internet Explorer usage collapse, Chrome surge

    At the start of 2016, Microsoft's Internet Explorer was still the most commonly used browser on the Web; it finished 2015 being used by about 46 percent of Web users, with 32 percent preferring Chrome, and 12 percent using Firefox. But Explorer's days have been numbered ever since Microsoft essentially ended its development. While the venerable browser is still supported and still gets security updates, its features and standard support have been frozen since 2015. Instead, Microsoft shifted active development to Edge, its new browser. While Edge is faster, more secure, and boasts much better support for Web standards, it's only available for Windows 10, which greatly limits its audience.

  • Launching a Site or Blog? Open Source Creation Tools Give You Many Choices

    Late last year, Datamation came out with an extensive evaluation of which open source content management systems (CMS) really stand out, which is a topic near and dear to us here at OStatic. Our site runs on Drupal, which is an open source platform that powers many sites around the web, but there are key differences between CMS offerings, and if you're looking for the right solution, we have some good resources for you.

    The Datamation story provides a nice overview of the open CMS space, but here are some of our newly updated, favorite ways to go about evaluating which is the right CMS for you.

    Marking a true renaissance for tools that can help anyone run a top-notch website or manage content in the cloud, open source content management systems (CMS) have come of age. You're probably familiar with some of the big names in this arena, including Drupal (which Ostatic is based on) and Joomla. As we noted in this post, selecting a CMS to build around can be a complicated process, since the publishing tools provided are hardly the only issue.

  • CES 2017 - Renault create world's first open-source mass market vehicle

    The new vehicle POM, based on Renault's popular Twizy, will be available to start-ups, independent laboratories, private customers and researchers, allowing them to customise the software and driving experience.

  • RcppTOML 0.1.0

    Big news: RcppTOML now works on Windows too!

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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: Software

  • Picard 1.4 released
    The last time we put out a stable release was more than 2 years ago, so a lot of changes have made it into this new release. If you’re in a hurry and just want to try it out, the downloads are available from the Picard website.
  • Linux Digital Audio Workstations: Open Source Music Production
    Linux Digital Audio Workstations When most people think of music programs, they’ll usually think Mac OS or Windows. However, there are also a few Linux digital audio workstations. The support and features of these programs can vary, but they’re a good choice to setup a cheap recording studio. Some of them are even good competitors for paid programs, offering features such as multitrack recording, MIDI, and virtual instruments. Keep in mind that many audio editing programs for Linux rely on the Jack backend. You’ll need a dedicated system to install these programs on, since it doesn’t work properly in a virtual machine. In the following article, we’ll cover audio editing programs that are available for Linux. We’ll talk about the available features, as well as help you decide which program to use for your needs.
  • i2pd 2.12 released
    i2pd (I2P Daemon) is a full-featured C++ implementation of I2P client. I2P (Invisible Internet Protocol) is a universal anonymous network layer. All communications over I2P are anonymous and end-to-end encrypted, participants don't reveal their real IP addresses.
  • 4 Command-Line Graphics Tools for Linux
    For the most part, they’re wrong. Command-line image tools do much of what their GUI counterparts can, and they can do it just as well. Sometimes, especially when dealing with multiple image files or working on an older computer, command-line tools can do a better job. Let’s take a look at four command-line tools that can ably handle many of your basic (and not-so-basic) image manipulation tasks.
  • CloudStats - Best Server Monitoring Tool for Linux Servers
    CloudStats is an effective tool for Linux server monitoring and network monitoring. With CloudStats you get whole visibility into key performance criteria of your Linux Server. You can proactively track different server metrics like CPU, disk and memory usage, services, apps, processes and more. The best thing is that you don’t need to have any special technical skills – this tool for server monitoring is very easy to install and run from any device.
  • New Inkscape 0.92.1 fixes your previous works done with Inkscape
    This blog-post is about a happy-end after a previously published blog-post named New Inkscape 0.92 breaks your previous works done with Inkscape published on 20 January. A lot of reactions did happen about this previous blog-post and the news get quickly viral. That's why I thought it was nice to make another blog post to "close this case".
  • Qt 5.10 To Have Built-In Vulkan Support
    With Qt 5.8 there was experimental Direct3D 12 support that left some disappointed the toolkit didn't opt for supporting Vulkan first as a cross-platform, high-performance graphics API. Fortunately, with Qt 5.10, there will be built-in Vulkan support. Going back nearly one year there has been Vulkan work around Qt while with Qt 5.10 it's becoming a reality. However, with Qt 5.9 not even being released until the end of May, Qt 5.10 isn't going to officially debut until either the very end of 2017 or early 2018.
  • Rusty Builder
    Thanks to Georg Vienna, Builder can now manage your Rust installations using RustUp!
  • GNOME MPlayer knows how to grow your playlist size

today's howtos

Leftovers: Gaming

  • Unvanquished Open-Source Shooter Game Prepares For An Exciting 2017
    The Unvanquished open-source first person shooter game had been very promising and issuing monthly alpha releases all the way up to 48 alpha versions while they ended that one year ago without any new releases. The project is still ongoing and they are preparing for a great 2017. The Unvanquished team posted a teaser to their project site this weekend. They have been working on some "much bigger" changes. They aren't saying what the next release will be, but most will know what generally follows alpha builds... I'm a big supporter of Unvanquished, and have heard from their project lead and look forward to what's next ;)
  • OSS: RPG Maker MV CoreScript
    "RPG Maker MV CoreScript" is a game engine player for 2D games that runs on the browser. "RPG Maker MV CoreScript" is designed as a game engine dedicated to "RPG Maker MV", the latest work of "RPG Maker" series of 2DRPG world number one software with more than 20 years history, and more than 1000 games are running. (February 2017)
  • HITMAN released for Linux, initial port report and two gameplay videos
    HITMAN [Steam, Feral Store] is the brand new Linux port from Feral Interactive and what a game it is! This is some serious fun to keep you occupied for many hours!
  • Hitman is Coming to Your Home
  • Castle Game Engine 6.0 Released
    Castle Game Engine is yet another open-source cross-platform game engine. What separates this game engine from others is that interestingly it's written in Object Pascal. Up until seeing this Castle Game Engine 6.0 release, I hadn't thought of Object Pascal in a few years and interesting it's being used by this game engine. Castle Engine 6.0 continues to be fitted for both 2D and 3D games and this latest release incorporates about one year of development work.

Fedora: The Latest

  • Anaconda Install Banners get a Makeover!
    A redesign/ update for Anaconda install banners has been an ongoing project for me since the summer and has recently, in the passed month or so, had a fair amount of conversation on its Pagure ticket. I have done multiple series of iterations for these banners, and in the couple of weeks have established a design that represents the Fedora vibe. There are three, sort of, sub-categories for the banners: Common Banners, Server-specific Banners, and Desktop-specific Banners. At this point I have completed drafts of the Common banners (available on all editions) and the Desktop-specific banners (available in addition to Common for Desktop editions).
  • This is why I drink: a discussion of Fedora's legal state
    Tom Callaway seems to be a very nice person who has been overclocked to about 140% normal human speed. In only 20 minutes he gave an interesting and highly-amusing talk that could have filled a 45-minute slot on the legal principles that underpin Fedora, how they got that way, and how they work out in practice. In the old days, Callaway said, Red Hat made Red Hat Linux, entirely in-house. What the company didn't make was any money; sales of hats generated more profit than sales of Red Hat box sets, which apparently were sold at a loss. It was felt that this plan wouldn't work out in the long term, so Red Hat changed to making Enterprise Linux. It didn't want to stop doing a hobbyist Linux, however, so Fedora Core was launched. Red Hat also wanted the community to have input into what Fedora was, and how it looked, but the company couldn't just drop the reins and let the community take over, because it was still legally the distributor.
  • Modularity & Generational Core: The future of Fedora?
  • Fedora 25: running Geekbench.