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OSS

Events: g2k16 Hackathon, SUSE Hackweek, LinuxFest Northwest 2017

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OSS
SUSE
  • g2k16 Hackathon Report: Matthieu Herrb on xenodm

    I started the hackathon by upgrading a number of packages in Xenocara. The most noteworthy being the XCB (X protocol C-language Bindings) suite updated to the most recent 1.12 version.

  • Hackweek projet: Let's Encrypt DNS-01 validation for acme.sh with Gandi LiveDNS

    Last week was SUSE Hackweek and one of my projects was to get Let's Encrypt configured and working on my NAS.

    Let's Encrypt is a project aimed at providing SSL certificates for free, in an automated way.

  • openSUSE at LinuxFest Northwest 2017

    LinuxFest Northwest 2017, coming up the first weekend in May, promises to continue its tradition of providing a unique, active, fun experience for open-source enthusiasts at all experience levels. openSUSE continues its long-term sponsorship of the event, and we are looking forward to having a lot of fun! Submit your session proposals by March 1, 2017!

    LinuxFest Northwest, if you’re not familiar, is one of the largest community-centric conferences in the USA, and a free+libre event (no attendance fees and registration is optional) promoting open source, open hardware, and community involvement. Now in its 16th year, with an audience rapidly approaching 2,000 people, the event continues to grow, attract a broader audience, and redefine the experience of a weekend conference. With a Linux Game Den, a Robotics Lab, a Job Fair (new this year), community mini-summits, as well as the expo hall and 8 – 10 parallel tracks of sessions, LFNW is a week of conference stuffed into a weekend.

OSS Leftovers

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OSS
  • How to get started in open source software

    A friend pointed me to the Open Source Guides website, a collection of resources for individuals, communities, and companies who want to learn how to run and contribute to an open source project. I thought it was very interesting for new contributors, so I thought I'd share it here.

  • Is Open Source the Future of Wall Street?

    Richard Craib, the South African technology guru and founder of nontraditional hedge fund Numerai, is hoping for nothing short of completely restructuring the hedge fund industry. Numerai has recently created a new type of digital currency, a so-called "digital token," which is based on the internet and which aims to help crowdsource data-sharing and decisionmaking among Wall Street professionals. If the idea catches on, it could mean a significant shift for the way that investors do business; typically, it has been everyone-for-himself, with managers guarding their strategies and ideas closely in an attempt to gain the upper edge over every competitor. Is it possible that Craib could bring about a Wall Street in which investors actually work together in a collaborative way?

  • Mozilla acquires read-it-later app Pocket, will open-source the code

    Mozilla, the company behind the Firefox browser, today announced that it has acquired Pocket, the startup that develops an app for saving articles and other content. Terms of the deal weren’t disclosed.

    The Pocket code will become a part of the Mozilla open-source project, Mozilla chief business and legal officer Denelle Dixon-Thayer wrote in a blog post.

  • Google Releases E2EMail to Open Source

    The ongoing struggle to provide encrypted email solutions that aren’t on a PGP level of complexity and difficulty is a real challenge.

    Google’s attempt at it, called E2EMail, was introduced more than a year ago as an effort to give users a Chrome app that allows for the simple exchange of private emails. On Friday, Google cut it loose to open source.

  • Google End-to-End encrypted email code goes open-source

    Google has announced that E2EMail, an experimental end-to-end encryption system, has now been given to the open-source community with no strings attached.

The top open source rookie projects of the year to watch

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OSS

Open-source projects underpin many of today's popular apps, software packages, and online services.

If a vendor releases code to the open-source community, license restrictions are removed and software can be integrated into other systems. From Google's end-to-end encryption system E2EMail to the Netflix cross-scripting site vulnerability scanner Sleepy Puppy, open-source development is thriving and thousands of developers contribute their time to improving coding and ferreting out bugs every month.

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Using Open Source to Empower Students in Tanzania

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Linux
OSS

Powering Potential Inc. (PPI) aims to enhance education opportunities for students in Tanzania with the help of the Raspberry Pi and open source technology.

“I believe technology is a vital part of the modern human experience. It enlightens. It ties us together. It broadens our horizons and teaches us what we can be. I believe everyone deserves access to these resources,” says Janice Lathen, Founding Director and President of PPI.

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Containers and OpenStack

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Server
OSS
  • Stateful containerized applications with Kubernetes

    To date, almost all of the talk about containers and microservices has been about "stateless" applications. This is entirely understandable because stateless applications are simply easier. However, containers and orchestration have matured to the point where we need to take on the interesting workloads: the stateful ones. That's why two of my talks at SCALE 15x are about databases, containers, and Kubernetes, which is an open source system for automating deployment, scaling, and management of containerized applications.

    Stateless services are applications like web servers, proxies, and application code, which may handle data, but they don't store it. These are easy to think about in an orchestration context because they are simple to deploy and simple to scale. If traffic goes up, you just add more of them and load-balance. More importantly, they are "immutable"; there is very little difference between the upstream container "image" and the running containers in your infrastructure. This means you can also replace them at any time, with little "switching cost" between one container instance and another.

  • 13 Companies Leading the Way with Containers

    As DevOps has grown in popularity, an increasing number of organizations are looking to containerization technology as a way to simplify and streamline application deployment and management. In fact, the RightScale 2017 State of the Cloud Report found that Docker, the leading containerization tool, was the most popular DevOps tool among the companies it surveyed. Forty percent of the enterprises surveyed said that they use Docker, and 30 percent more said they planned to do so in the future.

  • A Guide to the OpenStack Ocata Release
  • OpenStack Ocata improves core components, containerization

    The OpenStack Foundation has released Ocata, the 15th iteration of the popular open source cloud platform. The latest release has focused on enhancing core compute and networking services and expanding support for application container technologies.

  • RDO Ocata Released

    The RDO community is pleased to announce the general availability of the RDO build for OpenStack Ocata for RPM-based distributions, CentOS Linux 7 and Red Hat Enterprise Linux. RDO is suitable for building private, public, and hybrid clouds. Ocata is the 15th release from the OpenStack project, which is the work of more than 2500 contributors from around the world (source).

  • Walmart Boasts 213,000 Cores on OpenStack

    Two Walmart associates who spoke recently at the Linux Foundation’s Leadership Summit provided some updates on the retailer’s efforts to automate its business.

    According to Andrew Mitry, a distinguished engineer, Cloud, and Megan Rossetti, a senior engineer, Cloud, the company is expanding its cloud services to encompass more than its e-commerce business. And it’s streamlined its cloud services and DevOps teams into one group for the whole company.

  • Reflections on the first #OpenStack PTG (Pike PTG, Atlanta)
  • A look at OpenStack's newest release, Ocata

    Are you interested in keeping track of what is happening in the open source cloud? Opensource.com is your source for news in OpenStack, the open source cloud infrastructure project.

Calamares 3.1 Distribution-Independent Linux Installer Officially Released

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Linux
OSS

The Calamares open-source universal installer framework for Linux-based operating systems has been updated recently to version 3.1, a major release the users of the KaOS GNU/Linux distribution can already enjoy if they download the latest ISO snapshot.

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OSS Leftovers

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OSS
  • What motivates the open-source community?

    Many of us will have been involved in a free-software community that ran out of steam, and either ended up moribund or just plain died. Some of us will have gone through such cycles more than once; it's never nice to watch something that used to be a vibrant community in its death throes. Knowing what motivates the sort of people who get heavily involved in free software projects is really useful when trying to keep them motivated, and a systematic approach to understanding this is what Rina Jensen, Strategist at Mozilla, talked about at FOSDEM 2017.

    Mozilla talks a lot about promoting innovation and opportunity on the web, and the organization does care a lot about those objectives, but the realities of day-to-day life can interfere and make working toward them tedious. The thinking was that if Mozilla could help make the experience for contributors better, then the contributors could make Mozilla better — but doing that required understanding how things could be better for contributors.

  • Shuttle Music Player is now Open Source

    Music is a major part of everyone’s life, and our smartphones allow us to truly enjoy our music anywhere. Over the years, Android has received a fair share of excellent music player apps, and Shuttle Music Player has managed to stand out.

    Shuttle is a music player following Google’s Material Design guidelines, and its listing is nearing 4 Million downloads. Currently, the app offers two versions: free and paid. The paid version is priced at $0.99 and has received over 50 thousand downloads on the Play Store already.

  • OpenStack isn’t dead. It’s boring. That’s a good thing.

    The first OpenStack Project Teams Gathering (PTG) event was held this week in Atlanta. The week was broken into two parts: cross-project work on Monday and Tuesday, and individual projects Wednesday through Friday. I was there for the first two days and heard a few discussions that started the same way.

  • NetBSD 7.1_RC2 available
  • NetBSD 7.1 RC2 Released

    The second release candidate to the upcoming NetBSD 7.1 is now available for testing.

    NetBSD 7.1 RC2 is primarily comprised of fixes since 7.1 RC1, and in particular, security fixes. The raw list of NetBSD 7.1 changes can be found here.

  • Pentagon Launches Open-Source Experiment

    With a new website showcasing federal software code, the Pentagon is the latest government entity to join the open-source movement.

    The Defense Department this week launched Code.mil, a public site that will eventually showcase unclassified code written by federal employees. Citizens will be able to use that code for personal and public projects. Code written by government employees can be shared with the public because that material usually isn't covered by copyright protections in the U.S., according to the Pentagon.

  • Coder Dojo: Kids Teaching Themselves Programming

    Despite not much advertising, word has gotten around and we typically have 5-7 kids on Dojo nights, enough that all the makerspace's Raspberry Pi workstations are filled and we sometimes have to scrounge for more machines for the kids who don't bring their own laptops.

    A fun moment early on came when we had a mentor meeting, and Neil, our head organizer (who deserves most of the credit for making this program work so well), looked around and said "One thing that might be good at some point is to get more men involved." Sure enough -- he was the only man in the room! For whatever reason, most of the programmers who have gotten involved have been women. A refreshing change from the usual programming group. (Come to think of it, the PEEC web development team is three women. A girl could get a skewed idea of gender demographics, living here.) The kids who come to program are about 40% girls.

  • Microsoft hasn't turned a phone into a PC just yet [Ed: copying GNU/Linux again]

    Using the Lapdock wired to the X3 charges the phone and provides the most reliable connection for Continuum. I found the wireless connection made things a little unreliable and choppy on some more graphically intense things like full-screen video playback. Connecting the phone is as simple as just plugging it in and watching a Windows 10 desktop burst to life on the Lapdock.

    While the Windows 10 desktop looks familiar, this is exactly when I realized just how limited Continuum really is. There’s a Start Menu that’s basically the home screen of a Windows phone, and access to Cortana, but there’s a lot missing. Things like putting apps side by side simply don’t exist in this Continuum world, nor do a lot of the typical places you’d right-click on apps or use keyboard shortcuts to get to the desktop. If you’re a Windows power user like me, or even if you’re just used to a standard window management system, it’s immediately frustrating.

Events: IBM Interconnect, foss-north 2017, C++ in Russia

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OSS
  • What I’m looking forward to at IBM Interconnect 2017

    IBM Interconnect 2017 is coming up next month in Las Vegas. Last year’s conference was a whirlwind of useful talks, inspiring hallway conversations, and great networking opportunities. I was exhausted by the week’s end, but it was totally worth it.

  • foss-north 2017

    After much preparation, the tickets for foss-north 2017 is available at foss-north.se – grab them while they are hot!

  • C++ in Russia, again

    Yesterday during our team meeting Eike told me that I’m a mobile C++ conference nowadays. While it sounds funny, it is true that I’ve been a bit more active than usual.

Leftovers: OSS

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OSS
  • Diving into Drupal: Princeton’s Multi-site Migration Success with Open-source

    Princeton University’s web team had a complex and overwhelming digital ecosystem comprised of many different websites, created from pre-built templates and hosted exclusively on internal servers.

    Fast forward six years: Princeton continues to manage a their multisite and flagship endeavors on the open-source Drupal platform, and have seen some great results since their migration back in 2011. However, this success did not come overnight. Organizational buy-in, multi-site migration and authentication were a few of the many challenges Princeton ran into when making the decision to move to the cloud.

  • GitHub Invites Developers to Contribute to the Open Source Guides

    GitHub has recently launched its Open Source Guides, a collection of resources addressing the most common scenarios and best practices for both contributors and maintainers of open source projects. The guides themselves are open source and GitHub is actively inviting developers to participate and share their stories.

  • Top open source projects

    TechRadar recently posted an article about "The best open source software 2017" where they list a few of their favorite open source software projects. It's really hard for an open source software project to become popular if it has poor usability—so I thought I'd add a few quick comments of my own about each.

  • Dropbox releases open-source Slack bot

    Dropbox is looking to tackle unauthorized access and other security incidents in the workplace with a chatbot. Called Securitybot, it that can automatically grab alerts from security monitoring tools and verify incidents with other employers.

    The company says that through the use of the chatbot, which is open source, it will no longer be necessary to manually reach out to employees to verify access, every time someone enters a sensitive part of the system.

    The bot is built primarily for Slack, but it is designed to be transferable to other platforms as well.

  • Dropbox’s tool shows how chatbots could be future of cybersecurity

    Disillusion with chatbots has set in across the tech industry and yet Dropbox’s deep thinkers believe they have spotted the technology’s hidden talent: cybersecurity.

Fresh Supply of FOSS FUD

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OSS
  • Think open source software is free? Think again… [Ed: Think open source FUD is dead? Think again… gymnastics in logic and cherry-picking]
  • Open Source: Not Pragmatic After All? [Ed: FUD that is repeating Microsoft talking points and dirty tricks in Munich, pretending that proprietary software never ceases development]

    Another open-source project, the Mozilla-backed (and Dipert-beloved) Thunderbird email client also mentioned as atypically thriving in my late-2012 blog post, is now also struggling. As is Firefox itself, which recently wound down its Firefox OS-for-smartphones efforts and is also facing browser add-on developer defections due to its embrace of Chrome-model APIs and other changes. Even mighty Linux is struggling with developer-induced bugs. Wonder if all this uncertainty is behind longstanding open-source poster child Munich, Germany's reconsideration of Microsoft products?

  • You Can’t Get Around Code Scanning if You Care About Open Source Licenses [Ed: Let's just pretend there are no issues associated with proprietary licensing, renewal, patching etc.]
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More in Tux Machines

Security Leftovers

  • How To Improve The Linux System’s Security Using Firejail
    As you already know, Linux kernel is secure by default. But, it doesn’t mean that the softwares on the Linux system are completely secure. Say for example, there is a possibility that any add-ons on your web browser may cause some serious security issues. While doing financial transactions over internet, some key logger may be active in browser which you are not aware of. Even though, we can’t completely give the bullet-proof security to our Linux box, we still can add an extra pinch of security using an application called Firejail. It is a security utility which can sandbox any such application and let it to run in a controlled environment. To put this simply, Firejail is a SUID (Set owner User ID up on execution) program that reduces the risk of security breaches by restricting the running environment of untrusted applications.
  • “Httpd and Relayd Mastery” off to copyedit
  • Kalyna Block Cipher

Containers vs. Zones vs. Jails vs. VMs

  • Setting the Record Straight: containers vs. Zones vs. Jails vs. VMs
    I’m tired of having the same conversation over and over again with people so I figured I would put it into a blog post. Many people ask me if I have tried or what I think of Solaris Zones / BSD Jails. The answer is simply: I have tried them and I definitely like them. The conversation then heads towards them telling me how Zones and Jails are far superior to containers and that I should basically just give up with Linux containers and use VMs. Which to be honest is a bit forward to someone who has spent a large portion of her career working with containers and trying to make containers more secure. Here is what I tell them:
  • [Old] Hadoop Has Failed Us, Tech Experts Say

    The Hadoop community has so far failed to account for the poor performance and high complexity of Hadoop, Johnson says. “The Hadoop ecosystem is still basically in the hands of a small number of experts,” he says. “If you have that power and you’ve learned know how to use these tools and you’re programmer, then this thing is super powerful. But there aren’t a lot of those people. I’ve read all these things how we need another million data scientists in the world, which I think means our tools aren’t very good.”

Wine and Games

  • [Wine] Packaging changes
    Today we want to announce some important changes regarding the Wine Staging packages provided at repos.wine-staging.com and dl.winehq.org. We completely reworked our build system to make the packages available sooner after a release and also added some new features, like downloading old packages for Debian / Ubuntu. The complete list of changes can be found in the announcement email on the Wine mailing list.
  • Planescape: Torment Enhanced Edition Announced for PC, Mac, Linux, and Mobile
  • Podcast #6 with Ethan Lee, Porter on Fez, Transistor
    Have you ever played Fez on Linux ? Transistor ? Speed Runners ? Shenzen I/O ? Bastion ? or more recently, Owlboy ? Well if you have, you have benefited from the work of Flibitijibibo who is directly responsible for the port of such titles to your platform.

Microsoft EEE and Openwashing