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OSS

Robust New FreeOffice Suite Proves Free Can Be Just as Good

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OSS
Reviews

FreeOffice is one of the best-performing Microsoft Word replacement suites for Linux. It is also a great replacement for Microsoft Windows run under WINE.

FreeOffice's design makes it a near twin to SoftMaker Office 2016. The differences are minor. If you have a compelling need for a pay-only option, then download the 30-day free trial edition to verify that you really do prefer the Office 2016 version.

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Leftovers: OSS

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OSS
  • Chatty Puppets on Atlassian HipChat

    HipChat is a team communications platform that provides 'persistent' one-on-one chat, group chat, video chat, file sharing and integrations.

  • Open Source Audio Video Apps: 36 Top Apps

    In the media-saturated world we live in, having an array of top-notch audio-video tools really comes in handy. Trim a file, edit a video, maximize your audio – we all need to feed our social media streams, and companies always need audio-video content to best communicate with users.

    This list of audio video apps is potentially a major cost saver. The following open source apps replace expensive commercial AV apps, often with very similar functionality.

    If you have addition AV apps you’d like to recommend, please use the Comments section below. Happy downloading!

  • Using behavioral patterns to build awesome communities

    Human beings are complicated animals. We are packed with ambitions, fears, desires, anxieties, and other nuggets of the human condition. Of course, the extent and manifestation of these different elements varies from person to person, across cultures, and in different environments.

    This makes building human systems—such as communities or companies—complicated. To some (typically bureaucrats), it can be tempting to ignore what makes us human and instead create seemingly logical processes, despite the processes not matching our human attributes well, and then convince people to use them. If you want to build engaging communities, don't try to model people in spreadsheets; rarely does it work well.

  • Is your open team fully awesome, or too cool for school?
  • firefox vs rthreads

    Firefox is too slow. OpenBSD is too slow. The combination is too too slow. This situation was known for some time, but resolution was also slow for quite some reasons.

    Many Firefox on OpenBSD users, particularly developers, only use OpenBSD so the extent of the performance gap between platforms went unnoticed. Web browsing would grow ever slower, but the only page that matters would continue to load as quickly as ever, once the slumbering lizard had awoken. Clearly the reason it takes me thirty seconds to view a single tweet was idiot kids and their infernal javascript frameworks.

  • Linux Top 3: CoreOS 1010.1.0, FreeBSD and PC-BSD 10.3

    Yes of course, we *know* that FreeBSD isn't Linux, but aside from using a different kernel (a big aside of course), there are a lot of common areas between modern BSD and Linux.

  • Recapping The New Features Of GCC 6: OpenMP 4.5, HSA, C++14, AMD Zen & More

    GNU --
    As GCC 6 should be officially released soon, here's a quick overview of the improvements and new features for this yearly free software compiler update.

  • Urgent - Help until 10 April to influence how 750 millions will be spent

    We were notified of a very interesting consultation by the European Commission. The European Commission is about to allocate 750 million Euro over the next years on the "future internet", but the really important subjects (like: everything we learned from Edward Snowden) are not on their radar - yet.

    However, if we bundle our efforts that is something that is definitely within reach. At the moment we are told there are only a couple of dozens of submissions from mostly the usual suspects, so your response would (at least on paper) count for influencing a few million Euro of this budget. It really makes a difference if you submit something, even if it is really short.

  • A French paperback edition of the book Free Culture by Lawrence Lessig is now available

    I'm happy to report that the French paperback edition of my project to translate the Free Culture book by Lawrence Lessig is now available for sale on Lulu.com. Once I have formally verified my proof reading copy, which should be in the mail, the paperback edition should be available in book stores like Amazon and Barnes & Noble too.

    This French edition, Culture Libre, is the work of the dblatex developer Benoît Guillon, who created the PO file from the initial translation available from the Wikilivres wiki pages and completed and corrected the translation to match the original docbook edition my project is using, as well as coordinated the proof reading of the final result. I believe the end result look great, but I am biased and do not read French. In addition to the paperback edition, the book is available in PDF, EPUB and Mobi format from the github project page linked to above.

  • Open Government integral part of Smart Cities

    Open Government initiatives should be an integral part of Smart Sustainable Cities. They ensure access to government data, stimulate citizen participation, and facilitate innovation. This is one of the recommendations made in the 'Smart Sustainable Cities — Reconnaissance Study' published last month by the Operating Unit on Policy-Driven Electronic Governance at United Nations University (UNU-EGOV).

  • Updated Austrian Manual for Data Managers available

    Last month, Austria published an updated 'Handbuch für Dateneinsteller' (Manual for Data Managers). It provides the country's public administration with all the information needed by agencies to get started using the national Open Government Data portal www.data.gv.at.

    The manual explains the OGD Austria initiative, the open data principles, the why, how, and by whom of publishing open data, followed by all the legal, procedural, organisational and technical details.

    The 'Handbuch für Dateneinsteller' is written in German and is freely available from the OGD Austria website.

  • pypy: suprisingly good

    That's better than I expected for the JIT technology.

Storming the government castle

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OSS

Open source software seems like a perfect fit for government IT projects. Developers can take advantage of existing code bases and, it's hoped, mold that code to their needs quickly and at less cost than developing code from scratch. Over the last few years, governments in the U.S. and abroad have been more closely embracing open source. However, agencies at all levels of U.S. government are still wary of open source and can be reluctant to adopt it. It's still not easy for government projects to use open source or for developers employed in the public sector to contribute their work to open source project.

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MPV 0.17.0 Open-Source Video Player Adds a Direct3D11 Video Acceleration Decoder

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Development
OSS

The developers behind the MPlayer-based MPV open-source video player software have announced today, April 11, 2016, the release of the MPV 0.17.0 update for all supported platforms.

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Linux and FOSS Events

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OSS
  • 2016 EuroLLVM Videos Now Available
  • Community Leadership Summit 2016

    On 14th – 15th May 2016 in Austin, Texas the Community Leadership Summit 2016 will be taking place. For the 8th year now, community leaders and managers from a range of different industries, professions, and backgrounds will meet together to share ideas and best practice. See our incredible registered attendee list that is shaping up for this year’s event.

    This year we also have many incredible keynotes that will cover topics such as building developer communities, tackling imposter syndrome, gamification, governance, and more. Of course CLS will incorporate the popular unconference format where the audience determine the sessions in the schedule.

  • Chariot Solutions Partners with Open Source Hazelcast

    The software development specialist Chariot adds open source Hazelcast 3.6 to its enterprise portfolio as the two companies announce partnership at the Philly ETE 2016 conference.

FOSS in Multimedia

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Movies
OSS

The Best Things in Life are Free

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OSS

On the other hand, software is still scarce — which is a problem because without software a computer is basically a paper weight. Yes, distributing software is nearly costless. However unlike hardware which involves costly manufacturing processes, the cost of making software consists almost completely of finding intelligent people to write it — and intelligent people are just as scarce as they’ve always been. Luckily, there’s a solution to this dilemma: open source. This idea isn’t new, but I think it’s really important so I wanted to write about it.

Open source software is software that is distributed freely. Now, this may sound like a terrible idea. People are altruistic — but only to a certain point. Why would people contribute to software for no reward? The key is that open source software is not only free, the process behind making it is transparent. You can change it. Open source projects start when people share code they wrote for their individual needs. Many times making this software publicly available is more cost effective than selling it. Since the source code is publically available, people can adapt the code, and fix problems as they arise.

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Give your Git Repository an Open Source Web Interface

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OSS

Git is a very popular open source version control system. Many developers use Git on a desktop machine and push their updates to a central server running on a service like GitHub or GitLab. Although such services are great, this may lead some to think of Git as a client-server model with local checkout of code and updates that are always being pushed back to the single central server.

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White House misses big opportunity with open source push

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OSS

To me -- as a lawyer, a software developer, and a former government technologist -- the question of open source versus closed source when it comes to government software shouldn't even be a question. With a few obvious exceptions for things like national or operational security, if taxpayers fund the creation of software, they should have the right to access that software. This is increasingly true as government agencies automate the traditionally human-based process they use to regulate industry and deliver citizen services each day. When such processes begin to be shielded behind commercial copyright or self-induced bureaucratic necessity, our government quickly becomes a black box.

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Android Leftovers

Leftovers: OSS

Ubuntu 16.04 Review: What’s New for Desktop Users

Ubuntu is a tricky distribution. As much as I love it on my home server, my desktop is a different ballgame. In my experience, releases between LTS versions have many new technologies that may or may not survive in the next LTS. There were many technologies or features that Canonical thought were ambitious -- HUD, experimenting with menus, online dash search, Ubuntu Software Center, etc. -- but they were abandoned. So, if I were to use Ubuntu on my desktop, I would still choose LTS. Read more

Workflow and efficiency geek talks Drush and Drupal

I started using Drupal because I needed an open source content management system (CMS) to use in several community projects. One of the projects I was involved with was just getting started and had narrowed its CMS selection down to either Drupal or Joomla. At the time I was using a different framework, but I had considered Drupal in the past and knew that I liked it a lot better than Joomla. I convinced them to go with the new Drupal 6 release and converted all of my other projects for consistency. I started working with Drush because I wanted a unified mechanism to work with local and remote sites. My first major contribution to Drush was site aliases and sql-sync in Drush 3. Read more