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OSS

Open Source, Mugged by Reality?

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OSS

The Open Source Business Conference held this month in San Francisco was chock-full of information on how to make money using open source software. It demonstrated that capitalists have finally discovered a new way to think about software development.

Open source wins court victory

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OSS
Legal

A German court agreed with a Linux programmer's contention that Fortinet, a US security appliance maker, must comply with the terms of the General Public License.

Open source community called to fight war on patents

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OSS

There is a war against the freedom to innovate and this community has done way too little to resist. Companies like Microsoft want to lock out competition, and the open source community is the anti-monopoly. Stand up and fight or risk being buried by patent-wielding legacy businesses.

CA Backs Single Open-Source License

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Hoping to bring some order to the chaotic system of open-source licenses, Computer Associates International Inc. is spearheading a campaign to create a single, common open-source license to which options can be added through a template.

Sun joins open-source-hating corporate club

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OSS

rut-ro Sun Microsystems justified the company's controversial open-source strategy with an attack on the GPL, which he characterised as a tool allowing United States businesses to pillage developing countries of their intellectual property.

Open Source Unwrapped

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OSS

One of the most important aspects of open source is its power and potential. Whenever the best minds in an industry join forces to create value, the potential is enormous. This has happened with space, cancer research, and the initial Internet itself. There are also political ramifications behind the open source movement. One can draw parallels between the open source movement and the open systems movement of the late 1980s. The open systems movement was intended to loosen IBM's stranglehold on computing. Likewise, the open source movement may well have its roots in loosening Microsoft's grip on power.

Who should maintain open source projects?

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OSS

Two different approaches to managing open source projects are emerging: one is community supported and developed, the other is commercial. Which will be around for the long haul?

AU Government to use open source to break lock-ins

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OSS

IT vendors pushing costly proprietary software lock-ins have been warned that feeding at the $4.2 billion IT trough of the Australian taxpayer is over and a strict and a new procurement diet for vendors will be personally enforced by the Special Minister of State, Senator Eric Abetz.

VCs Back Open-Source Upstarts

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OSS

Kim Polese has a history of spotting a hot tech market and getting venture capitalists to pony up the money to back her ideas. After making a tech-boom splash in the 1990s with Marimba Inc., Polese now has her sights set on an emerging area of the open-source software market that has investors dusting off their checkbooks.

Open Source Meets Capitalism

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The open source community is evolving in a positive way, and the best thing governments can do is relax and let the marketplace shape the future. When governments try to guess what path is best for technology development, they usually botch the job.

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Security: Updates, Mirai and Singapore's Massive Breach

  • Security updates for Friday
  • Mirai botnet hackers [sic] avoid jail time by helping FBI

    The three men, Josiah White, 21, Dalton Norman, 22, and Paras Jha, 22, all from the US, managed to avoid the clink by providing "substantial assistance in other complex cybercrime investigations", according to the US Department of Justice. Who'd have thought young hacker [sic] types would roll over and show their bellies when faced with prison time....

  • A healthcare IT foundation built on gooey clay
    Today, there was a report from the Solicitor General of Singapore about the data breach of the SingHealth systems that happened in July. These systems have been in place for many years. They are almost exclusively running Microsoft Windows along with a mix of other proprietary software including Citrix and Allscript. The article referred to above failed to highlight that the compromised “end-user workstation” was a Windows machine. That is the very crucial information that always gets left out in all of these reports of breaches. I have had the privilege of being part of an IT advisory committee for a local hospital since about 2004 (that committee has disbanded a couple of years ago, btw). [...] Part of the reason is because decision makers (then and now) only have experience in dealing with proprietary vendor solutions. Some of it might be the only ones available and the open source world has not created equivalent or better offerings. But where there are possibly good enough or even superior open source offerings, they would never be considered – “Rather go with the devil I know, than the devil I don’t know. After all, this is only a job. When I leave, it is someone else’s problem.” (Yeah, I am paraphrasing many conversations and not only from the healthcare sector). I recall a project that I was involved with – before being a Red Hatter – to create a solution to create a “computer on wheels” solution to help with blood collection. As part of that solution, there was a need to check the particulars of the patient who the nurse was taking samples from. That patient info was stored on some admission system that did not provide a means for remote, API-based query. The vendor of that system wanted tens of thousands of dollars to just allow the query to happen. Daylight robbery. I worked around it – did screen scrapping to extract the relevant information. Healthcare IT providers look at healthcare systems as a cashcow and want to milk it to the fullest extent possible (the end consumer bears the cost in the end). Add that to the dearth of technical IT skills supporting the healthcare providers, you quickly fall into that vendor lock-in scenario where the healthcare systems are at the total mercy of the proprietary vendors.

Recoll – A Full-Text GUI Search Tool for Linux Systems

We wrote on various search tools recently like in 9 Productivity Tools for Linux That Are Worth Your Attention and FSearch, and readers suggested awesome alternatives. Today, we bring you an app that can find text anywhere in your computer in grand style – Recoll. Recoll is an open-source GUI search utility app with an outstanding full-text search capability. You can use it to search for keywords and file names on Linux distros and Windows. It supports most of the document formats and plugins for text extraction. Read more

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Linux Foundation for Sale

  • Open Source Summit EU Registration Deadline, Sept. 22, Register Now to Save $150 [Ed: Microsoft is the "DIAMOND" sponsor of this event, the highest sponsorship level! Linux Foundation, or the Zemlin PAC, seems to be more about Microsoft than about Linux.]
  • Building a Secure Ecosystem for Node.js [Ed: Earlier today the Zemlin PAC did this puff piece for Microsoft (a sponsor)]
  • The Human Side of Digital Transformation: 7 Recommendations and 3 Pitfalls [Ed: New Zemlin PAC-sponsored and self-serving puff piece]
    Not so long ago, business leaders repeatedly asked: “What exactly is digital transformation and what will it do for my business?” Today we’re more likely to hear, “How do we chart a course?” Our answer: the path to digital involves more than selecting a cloud application platform. Instead, digital, at its heart, is a human journey. It’s about cultivating a mindset, processes, organization and culture that encourages constant innovation to meet ever-changing customer expectations and business goals. In this two-part blog series we’ll share seven guidelines for getting digital right. Read on for the first three.