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OSS

Call for nominations for the 2006 FSF Award for the Advancement of Free Software

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OSS

The Free Software Foundation (FSF) and the GNU Project announce the request for nominations for the 2006 Award for the Advancement of Free Software. This annual award is presented to a person who has made a great contribution to the progress and development of free software, through activities that accord with the spirit of software freedom (as defined in the Free Software Definition).

Open Source vs. Open Standards Telephony

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OSS

The focus of open source development at large is solving pragmatic problems. Many developers turn to open source because of frustrations they've experienced in working with proprietary technologies. Open source provides a level of flexibility that proprietary platforms cannot offer because they, like so many open standards platforms, require complicated implementations to achieve simple applications.

Intel aims for open-source graphics advantage

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Intel has released open-source software to give Linux full-fledged support for 3D graphics, a move that could give its graphics chips a leg up over rivals.

OSDL Signs Up Xandros To Accelerate Adoption Of Desktop Linux

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Open Source Development Labs (OSDL) and Xandros, provider of easy-to-use Linux alternatives to Windows desktop and server products, announced that Xandros is joining the Labs to help drive the adoption of desktop Linux.

Giant Robots And Killer Licenses

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OSS

Maybe I should have titled this Why you should fear proprietary software. I generally leave pointing people to other stories to . . . er, um, well, other people. These stories, however, highlight so beautifully why open source software, open protocols, and open data formats are so important.

The ODF debate: A real world view

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OSS

What exactly is meant by document portability? Does it mean that a document created in one application can be viewed using a different application on another operating system? Does it mean that the document can be viewed and edited within another application on the same or another OS platform? Or does it simply mean that you can be sure that the document you create today can be read in the future using proprietary products from the same software vendor?

SPI board drops Perens

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OSS

Open source developer and evangelist Bruce Perens says he is not overly concerned about being voted off the board of Software in the Public Interest, the non-profit open source organization he founded a decade ago.

Why Binary-Only Linux Kernel Modules are Illegal

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OSS

As soon as it’s clear that you’re distributing a binary blob that, by your intent, uses anything in the kernel apart from the standard userland system call boundary, you’ve distributed a derivatve work and the GPL terms apply.

Easing kids into free software

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A few months ago I went in search of educational software written for Linux. I built her a machine from old spares and wanted to introduce her to the world of open source software. I was astonished at the amount of open source software for kids out there.

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Complete Guide on How to Dual Boot Ubuntu and Windows

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