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OSS

Who should maintain open source projects?

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OSS

Two different approaches to managing open source projects are emerging: one is community supported and developed, the other is commercial. Which will be around for the long haul?

AU Government to use open source to break lock-ins

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OSS

IT vendors pushing costly proprietary software lock-ins have been warned that feeding at the $4.2 billion IT trough of the Australian taxpayer is over and a strict and a new procurement diet for vendors will be personally enforced by the Special Minister of State, Senator Eric Abetz.

VCs Back Open-Source Upstarts

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OSS

Kim Polese has a history of spotting a hot tech market and getting venture capitalists to pony up the money to back her ideas. After making a tech-boom splash in the 1990s with Marimba Inc., Polese now has her sights set on an emerging area of the open-source software market that has investors dusting off their checkbooks.

Open Source Meets Capitalism

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OSS

The open source community is evolving in a positive way, and the best thing governments can do is relax and let the marketplace shape the future. When governments try to guess what path is best for technology development, they usually botch the job.

Open-Source Referees Change the Rules

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OSS

The Open Source Initiative board on Wednesday adopted a new way of approving open-source licenses, as well as a new classification system for existing licensees, at its meeting at the Open Source Business Conference in San Francisco.

Government IT gets star treatment at FOSE

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OSS

The 29th edition of FOSE opened today at the Washington Convention Center with a three-day slate of exhibits, demonstrations, discussions and meetings on IT and government.

Open-Source Security Tools Touted at InfoSec

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OSS
Security

A well-known security consultant on Tuesday urged cash-strapped businesses to consider using free, readily available open-source security tools and applications to help cope with the rising spate of malicious hacker attacks.

Open Source to the Rescue

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OSS

Friendster scales the network with open source

When the upstart social networking site skyrocketed to success, its engineers turned to free software to handle the load.

Open-source companies chase steady money

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OSS

When entrepreneur Byron Sebastian started his company last year, he set his sights on the business software industry's ultimate cash cow: maintenance contracts.

Samba, Soccer and Open Source

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OSS

Since the election of President Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva, Brazil has gradually become a beachhead for Open Source, and consequently a thorn in Microsoft's side. Amazed by Open Source potential, it could completely undermine Microsoft's monopoly, and it probably will.

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OSS: IBM, Logz.io, Forbes FUD and OpenAI

Graphics: Mesa and More

Red Hat Leftovers

Kernel: CH341 and LWN Articles (Just Freed)

  • Linux Adds CH341 GPIO
    There was a time when USB to serial hardware meant one company: FTDI. But today there are quite a few to choose from and one of the most common ones is the WCH CH341. There’s been support for these chips in Linux for a while, but only for use as a communication port. The device actually has RS232, I2C, SPI, and 8 general purpose I/O (GPIO) pins. [ZooBaB] took an out-of-tree driver that exposes the GPIO, and got it working with some frightening-looking CH341 boards.
  • Shrinking the kernel with an axe
    This is the third article of a series discussing various methods of reducing the size of the Linux kernel to make it suitable for small environments. The first article provided a short rationale for this topic, and covered link-time garbage collection. The second article covered link-time optimization (LTO) and compared its results to link-time garbage collection. In this article we'll explore ways to make LTO more effective at optimizing kernel code away, as well as more assertive strategies to achieve our goal.
  • The rest of the 4.16 merge window
    At the close of the 4.16 merge window, 11,746 non-merge changesets had been merged; that is 5,000 since last week's summary. This merge window is thus a busy one, though not out of line with its predecessors — 4.14 had 11,500 changesets during its merge window, while 4.15 had 12,599. Quite a bit of that work is of the boring internal variety; over 600 of those changesets were device-tree updates, for example. But there was still a fair amount of interesting work merged in the second half of the 4.16 merge window; read on for the highlights.