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OSS

LinuxToday: The Four L's

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OSS

I am, for the most part, an only child. So it used to puzzle me greatly when my two daughters would fight over the most trivial of issues. Such are my feelings regarding the current rash of KDE/GNOME bashing going on in various blogs and forums.

Mark Shuttleworth: Big challenges for the Free Software Community

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The “character” I like most about the free software community is that it is not afraid of setting itself audacious goals. I like that in a person, especially when combined with a cunning plan, good ethics and a capacity for work, and if you think of the free software community as a gaia-like “living creature” it very much has those same traits.

Open source is a "red herring", says Newham CIO

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The IT chief at a London Borough which was a key battleground between Microsoft and open source has described open source software as a "red herring".

Balancing Open Source and Commerce

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If ever there was a topic that someone was qualified to discuss, it would be me talking about how open source companies need to balance the interests of their community while making money. In fact, our company is named Funambol because it is based on the Latin words funis (rope) and ambulare (walking) that mean a tightrope walker.

Debian and the Creative Commons

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The problem essentially is this: none of the Creative Commons licenses have a "source" requirement (unlike the GPL, for example), because, being intended for creative content, it was generally felt that no definition of "source" was really workable, and what's worse, the intuitive rules for different media would likely be very different.

GPL backers agree to disagree

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Admit it: you've never bothered reading the End-User Licence Agreements (EULAs) that came with your desktop software. But licences do matter. A new version of its overarching licence has opened a split between free and open source software.

Dumping Cisco for open-source

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The open-source movement, which has long made inroads into corporations via Linux and other enterprise-level software, now has a potentially bigger target in its cross hairs: the PBXs and network routers from companies such as Cisco Systems Inc. that form the basis of networking infrastructure.

Study: open source needs official support; Lobbyist disagrees with "flawed" conclusions

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Late last month, a research team led by University of Maastricht computer scientists and economists presented the results of what they had been working on for the past two years: a "Study on the Economic Impact of Open Source Software on Innovation and the Competitiveness of the Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) Sectors in the EU."

Free Standards Group launches LSB Developer Network

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The Free Standards Group (FSG) is scheduled to announce today its answer to the Microsoft Developer Network (MSDN) -- the Linux Standard Base (LSB) Developer Network. The LSB Developer Network (LDN) will combine community content with original content in one convenient location to provide developers with information on writing portable Linux applications.

A Question of Choice

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Choice: it's one of the key ideas at the heart of free software. The right to choose how to use your software, the right to choose who you share it with. Who could be against choice?

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More in Tux Machines

GNOME: libxmlb, Glade Support for Builder and Vala

  • libxmlb now a dependency of fwupd and gnome-software
    I’ve just released libxmlb 0.1.3, and merged the branches for fwupd and gnome-software so that it becomes a hard dependency on both projects. A few people have reviewed the libxmlb code, and Mario, Kalev and Robert reviewed the fwupd and gnome-software changes so I’m pretty confident I’ve not broken anything too important — but more testing very welcome.
  • Christian Hergert: Glade Support for Builder
    One of the things we’ve wanted in Builder for a while is a designer. We’ve had various prototypes in the past to see how things would have worked out, and mostly just punted on the idea because it seemed like Glade served users better than we would be able to directly. Last week, Juan Pablo, Matthias Clasen and I met up in San Francisco to see what we could do in the short term. We discussed a couple of options that we have going forward. Integrate glade 3 into Builder using libgladeui. Integrate glade 3 using the external Glade application and use D-Bus to inter-operate. Like all projects, we have some constraints.
  • Daniel Espinosa: Vala state: October 2018
    While I think maintainability could be improved, adding to history commits from contributions, apart from the ones coming from current Maintainer. Actually, there are some lot of commits not in history coming from authors outside current ones. Hope with new GitLab GNOME’s instance, this will reflect the correct situation. Behind scenes, Vala has to improve its code base to adapt to new requirements like to develop a descent Vala Language Server and more IEDs supporting Vala. At least for me, even GEdit is productive enough to produce software in Vala, because the language itself; write a Class, an Interface and implement interfaces, is 10 times faster in Vala than in C. Vala has received lot of improvements in last development cycles, like a new POSIX profile, ABI stability, C Warnings improvements and many other, to be reported in a different article. Look at Vala’s repository history, you will see more “feature” commits than “bindings” ones, contrary to the situation reported by Emmanuel, while should be a good idea to produce a graphic on this, but resent improvements could tell by them self the situation has been improved in recent release cycles. Lets look at repository’s chart. It reports 2000 commits in the last 3 months, 1.1 average per day, from 101 contributions as for October 19, 2018. Me at 10 commits from the last year, so I’m far to be a core contributor, but push ABI stability to be a reality. My main contributions are to communicate Vala advances and status.

today's howtos

10 Best Free Project Management and Birdtray

  • 10 Best Free Project Management Tools for You
    Whether you are a single user with many tasks, a startup company, or an already established business looking for an efficient way to plan your workflow and organize your projects, there are several project management tools you can use to get work done. They are modern, easy to manage, and best of all, easy to get up to speed with if you’re a newcomer to project management. Here is our list of the best project management tools you can use to increase your productivity and that of your team for free.
  • Birdtray: Thunderbird Tray Icon With New Email Notifications For Linux (Firetray Alternative)
    Birdtray adds a system tray icon for Thunderbird email client on Linux (Xorg), which shows the unread email count. Besides this, Birdtray supports snoozing new email notifications, configure for which accounts / email folders to notify of new emails, and more. FireTray and other solutions to add a tray icon for Thunderbird that displays an unread email count stopped working with Thunderbird 60. Birdtray checks the unread email status directly by reading the Thunderbird email search database, which makes it immune to Thunderbird API changes. As a result, Birdtray is a great Firetray alternative that shouldn't break on Thunderbird updates.

Open Source 3D Printing and Open Source MIDI Foot Controller

  • Open Source 3D Printing: Exploring Scientific and Medical Solutions
    3D Printing is not a new thing to hear about. It is a very popular industry right now that began in the early 80s. But how different is Open Source 3D Printing from proprietary designs? How does this affect its applications in Science and Medicine? Let’s read on.
  • Finally, An Open Source MIDI Foot Controller
    MIDI has been around for longer than most of the readers of Hackaday, and you can get off my lawn. In spite of this, MIDI is still commonly used in nearly every single aspect of musical performance, and there are a host of tools and applications to give MIDI control to a live performance. That said, if you want a MIDI foot controller, your best bet is probably something used from the late 90s, although Behringer makes an acceptable foot controller that doesn’t have a whole bunch of features. There is obviously a need for a feature packed, Open Source MIDI foot controller. That’s where the Pedalino comes in. It’s a winner of the Musical Instrument Challenge in this year’s Hackaday Prize, and if you want a MIDI foot controller, this is the first place you should look.