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The open-source key to lasting software

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OSS

Dan Bricklin, who helped kick-start the personal computer revolution in the 1980s as co-inventor of VisiCalc, recently named by [Boston] Governor Romney to a state information technology advisory panel, [states] open source is key to creating "Software That Lasts 200 Years."

Open-Source Guru Says JCP Is Too Closed

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"While Sun Microsystems Inc. moves to open-source its Solaris operating system and releases key patents in a nod to the open-source community, the company still takes a rap for hampering open source in other ways."

New OSI President Steps Down

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Russ Nelson, the newly elected president of the Open Source Initiative, resigned his office retroactively to Feb. 23 amidst accusations of racism. He states, "I'm resigning from the presidency of the Open Source Initiative, effective last Wednesday (2/23). I have waited to make this announcement because it is not easy to admit inadequacy publicly."

CA confirms plans for open source patent pledge

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"Systems management vendor Computer Associates International has confirmed that it intends to pledge a number of its patents to the open source community to remove any perceived threat against the Linux operating system."

KDE's FOSDEM report

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Software
OSS

Jonathan Riddell has posted news and pictures of Europe's biggest meeting of Free Software developers last weekend. He briefs us on the discussions and drops some big names. It sounds like it was great. Wish I could have been there. Big Grin

Concerns About Open Source "Zealots"

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"Speaking live on SYS-CON.TV, Linux Business Week editor-in-chief Maureen O'Gara talked with SYS-CON Media West Coast bureau chief Roger Strukhoff about a variety of issues, including zealotry and what she interprets as the "anti-capitalist" overtones of the open source movement."

Open Source Getting More Attention

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Open source software seems to be becoming a buzz word and increasingly more trendy with mainstream companies.

IBM backs open-source Web software

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"IBM is putting its corporate heft behind a popular open-source Web development technology called PHP, in a move meant to reach out to a broader set of developers."

EBay eyes open source

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Web

Following a path laid by open source developers, eBay may open up some of its source code in order to quicken the pace of application development and open up new business opportunities.

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Games: OpenMW and Linux Gaming Benchmark

  • OpenMW, the open source Morrowind game engine continues advancing
    OpenMW [Official Site], the open source Morrowind game engine continues advancing with recent blog posts highlighting some changes sounding rather great. Speaking on their official blog, the developers noted back in September that they've had some new developers come on board, with thanks in part to the multiplayer "TES3MP" project (Morrowind Multiplayer), which is built from OpenMW.
  • Core i7 8700K vs. Ryzen 7 1800X For NVIDIA/Radeon Linux Gaming
    Following last week's look at using the new "Coffee Lake" Intel Core i3 / i5 / i7 CPUs for Linux gaming comparison among our other ongoing tests of these new "8th Gen" processors, a frequent request has been a closer look at the gaming performance between the Core i7 8700K and the Ryzen 7 1800X. Here's a look with two AMD Radeon graphics cards and two NVIDIA GeForce offerings.

Bloomberg's big move on machine learning and open source

With its orange text on black interface and colour coded keyboard, the Bloomberg professional services terminal – known simply as ‘The Terminal’ – doesn’t appear to have changed much since it was launched in the early ’80s. But behind the retro (Bloomberg prefers ‘modern icon’) stylings, its delivery of financial markets data news, and trading tools has advanced rapidly. The terminal’s 315,000 subscribers globally are now able to leverage on machine learning, deep learning, and natural language processing techniques developed by the company, as they seek an edge in their investment decisions. Bloomberg is also applying those same techniques to its internal processes. Leading the company’s efforts in the area is Bloomberg’s head of data science Gideon Mann, who spoke with CIO Australia earlier this month. [...] Behind much of Bloomberg’s recent builds has been an open source ethic. Mann says there has been a sea change within the company about open source. "When the company started in 1981 and there really wasn't a whole lot of open source. And so there was a mentality of you know if it's not invented here we're not interested,” Mann says. [...] The organisation took some convincing, but, championed by the CTO, there has been a “huge culture change” towards open source. “There are two groups you got to convince: you’ve got to convince management that using open source is going to be safe and lead to better software, and then you also have to convince engineers that using open source is going to increase their skillset, will lead to software that’s easier to maintain and is less buggy and it's going to be a more beautiful system. Once you can kind of convince those two then you're set,” Mann says. The company is an active contributor to projects including Solr, Hadoop, Apache Spark and Open Stack. Read more Also: Uber Open Sources AthenaX, Its Streaming Analytics Platform

Firefox 57 - Trick or Treat?

The best way to describe Firefox 57 is too little, too late, but better later than never. In a way, it's a pointless release, because it brings us back roughly where Firefox was and should have been years ago. Only all this time in between was wasted losing user base. WebExtensions will be the thing that makes or breaks the browser, and with insufficient quality in the available replacements for those that don't make the culling list, there will be no real incentive for people to stay around. Firefox 57 is better than earlier versions in terms of looks and performance, but that's like saying you get 50% discount on a price that is twice what it should be. Ultimately unnecessary, just like graduating from university by the age of 68. There aren't any major advantages over Chrome. This is essentially a Firefox that sucks less. So yes, on the positive side, if you do want to continue using Firefox, version 57 makes much more sense than the previous 53 releases. It has an almost normal look, some of the sorely needed security & privacy addons are available, and it offers a passable user experience in terms of speed and responsiveness. Bottom line, I will stick with Firefox for now. As long as my extensions keep working. Take care. Read more

Android Leftovers