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OSS

FSF Explains GPL 3.0 Vision

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OSS

Any program could be destroyed or crippled by a software patent belonging to someone who has no other connection to the program, they said, adding that most countries have followed the direction of the United States in allowing software to be patented to at least some degree, and, by the end of the decade, commentators were criticizing the GPL for doing too little to combat patents.

Open Source Saves Credit Company Thousands in Licence Costs

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I was apprehensive about Linux and open source in general as I had always assumed that it was something only techies used and was not very user friendly. "Since buying the Linux server I have found it easier to use than our old Windows NT server. Things like adding new users and setting administration rights are far simpler, e-mail handling and backup solutions are also much improved.

Public debate on GPL 3 draft begins

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The foundation is revising the GPL for the first time in 15 years, and this time the organisation is accepting suggestions from the broad base of people and organisations now involved in the free software and open-source software movements. Over the last decade and a half, the GPL grew from an academic curiosity created by programmer and FSF founder Richard Stallman into a critical foundation of much of the software realm.

GPLv3 Draft Published

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The licenses for most software are designed to take away your
freedom to share and change it. By contrast, the GNU General Public
License is intended to guarantee your freedom to share and change free
software--to make sure the software is free for all its users. We,
the Free Software Foundation, use the GNU General Public License for
most of our software; it applies also to any other program whose
authors commit to using it.

Open Source Software: Free and Open Source License Myths

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Virtually all software is distributed under the terms of some license that spells out what the user is and is not permitted to do with the code. The growth of the open source community would not hurt proprietary vendors so badly if it were not for the GPL. It restricts how software may be used that makes it impossible for traditional proprietary software vendors to benefit.

Microsoft licences too expensive, say UK schools

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"A lot of schools are looking at open source -- budgets come into play here. Microsoft licensing takes a big chunk out of schools budgets. The biggest issue is cost, basically."

Open Source Roundup: Was 2005 a watershed year for open source?

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The end of one year and the beginning of another brought with it the predictable mix of reflection and prognostication that characterises the annual transition. This last week also brought with it some interesting commentary. Business Week described 2005 as "a watershed for open source", this despite a series of highly critical articles which appeared in the magazine over the course of the year.

GPL 3: Pre-Release Buzz Centers on Patents, License Compatibility

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The first public draft of GNU General Public License 3.0 will be released at an event at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge, Mass., on Monday, and open-source software advocates are hoping that effective provisions for software patents as well as GPL compatibility with other licenses will be prominent in the draft.

Open Source for iTunes arrives

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ADHERENTS of the two new IT religions of the post modern age, Open Source and Apple, are set to clash over an idea being pushed forward by a bloke called Rob Lord.

Study: 40 percent of Irish companies choose open source

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More than 40 percent of organizations in Ireland will use some form of open-source software in 2006, according to a study by iReach, a research company in Dublin.

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