OSS

Free/Open Source software (FOSS)

“To whom much has been given, much is expected in return” – Free Software economics

Filed under
LibO
OSS
OOo

When it comes to Free Software projects, there’s a profound, deep misunderstanding about who does what and how it’s being done. Using the now overused quote, developers write a code “because they have an itch to scratch”, means that there can be twenty different motivations to contribute to Free Software. No one needs to explain or justify his or her contribution. In the real world, one of the most common motivation is money, be it in the form of a salary, a fee, or a transaction involving the developers to fix whatever bug or develop a new feature. Most of the FOSS projects I know -excluding Firefox- do not pay developers directly for fixing bugs except in very specific circumstances and by definition not on a regular basis. The LibreOffice project is no different. The Document Foundation serves the LibreOffice project by financing its infrastructure, protecting its assets and improving LibreOffice in almost every way except paying for development on a regular basis. What this means, in other terms, is that the Document Foundation does not provide support; nor does it provide service to customers. In this sense, it is not a software vendor like Microsoft or Adobe. This is also one of the reasons why there is no “LTS” version of LibreOffice; because the Document Foundation will not provide a more or less mythical “bug-free version” of LibreOffice without ensuring the developers get paid for this. The healthiest way to do this is to grow an ecosystem of developers and service providers who are certified by the Document Foundation and are able to provide professionals with support, development, training and assistance.

Read more

Announcing Project Zero

Filed under
Google
OSS
Security

Security is a top priority for Google. We've invested a lot in making our products secure, including strong SSL encryption by default for Search, Gmail and Drive, as well as encrypting data moving between our data centers. Beyond securing our own products, interested Googlers also spend some of their time on research that makes the Internet safer, leading to the discovery of bugs like Heartbleed.

The success of that part-time research has led us to create a new, well-staffed team called Project Zero.

Read more

Coimbra University to save plenty with open source ERP

Filed under
OSS

By implementing ODOO, an open source solution for enterprise resource planning (ERP), the University of Coimbra in Portugal can expect to save more than 70 per cent over the next five to six years compared to the costs of a well-known proprietary ERP solution, says ThinkOpen, a Portuguese ERP consultancy. The university is using ODOO (renamed in May from OpenERP) for its five stores.

Read more

Though “barely an operating system,” DOS still matters (to some people)

Filed under
OS
OSS

Earlier this month, I spent a day working in the throwback world of DOS. More specifically, it was FreeDOS version 1.1, the open source version of the long-defunct Microsoft MS-DOS operating system. It's a platform that in the minds of many should've died a long time ago. But after 20 years, a few dozen core developers and a broader, much larger contributor community continue furthering the FreeDOS project by gradually adding utilities, accessories, compilers, and open-source applications.

All this labor of love begs one question: why? What is it about a single-tasking command-line driven operating system—one that is barely up to the most basic of network-driven tasks—that has kept people’s talents engaged for two decades? Haven't most developers abandoned it for Windows (or, tragically, for IBM OS/2)? Who still uses DOS, and for what?

Read more

Is making your product free and open source crazy talk?

Filed under
Interviews
OSS

Making money from open source. To many in the corporate world, that seems like a contradiction in terms. How are you supposed to make money from something that you give away? they ask. It can be done. A number of companies, large and small, have done quite well in the open source space over the years.

Just ask Patrick McFadin. He’s the chief evangelist for Apache Cassandra at DataStax, a company that’s embraced the open source way. He’s also interviewed leaders at a number of successful open source companies to gain insights into what makes a successful open source business.

Read more

When "Free" Can Suck.

Filed under
GNU
Linux
OSS

When I first started The HeliOS Project, I was using Librenet on my personal computer. Libranet had a per-user licensing agreement in order to make the effort pay and a single user license was for 69.00 If I remember correctly. Jon Danzig and I worked out a multiple licensing agreement that we could both live with. The fact is, Jon almost gave those licenses away because he believed in what we were doing. Jon's untimely death in 2005 eventually resulted in the Libranet venture striking their tents and moving on.

Read more

Breach is a completely modular, hackable and open source web browser

Filed under
OSS
Web

When it comes to surfing the web, our options are limited: the market is dominated by three or four mainstream web browsers, all of which share major similarities in design and function. Unless you want to build your own browsing program, you're stuck with their modern browsing paradigms. For San Francisco programmer Stanislas Polu, that wasn't good enough, so, he created Breach -- an open source modular web browser designed to allow anybody to tweak and modify it on a whim.

Read more

Untapped potential? Rise of open source council web tools

Filed under
OSS

UK councils are so far failing to tap into the full money-saving potential and speed of open source web service tools, but moves are underway to address this, delegates heard at yesterday's 'Building perfect council websites' conference in Birmingham.

Although most councils still run a Microsoft-based ICT infrastructure, almost all do also now run at least some open source software, Kevin Jump, director of digital services firm Jumoo, told delegates.

Jump is former web manager at Liverpool City Council, which migrated to open source CMS Umbraco in 2011.

Read more

NASA’s CTO: Open source software keeps us honest

Filed under
OSS

Kemp went on to found Nebula, which makes cloud computing hardware appliances, and now serves as the company’s chief strategy officer.

Read more

Understanding the metrics behind open source projects

Filed under
OSS

What do the numbers behind an open source project tell us about where it is headed? That's the subject of Jesus M. Gonzalez-Barahona's OSCON 2014 talk later this month, where he looks at four open source cloud computing projects—OpenStack, CloudStack, Eucalyptus, and OpenNebula—and turns those numbers into a meaningful analysis.

And Gonzalez-Barahona knows analytics. As co-founder of Bitergia, he is an expert in the quantitative aspects of open source software projects. Bitergia's goal is to analyze software development metrics and to help projects and communities put these numbers to use by managing and improving their processes.

Read more

LibreSSL Portable Encounters Its First Release

Filed under
OSS
Security

OpenBSD developers have announced their first release of LibreSSL portable.

LibreSSL 2.0.0 is the release and is tested to build on Linux, Solaris, Mac OS X, and FreeBSD systems. Bob Beck of OpenBSD explains, "This is intended as an initial release to allow the community to start using and providing feedback. We will be adding support for other platforms as time and resources permit."

Read more

Introduction to 4 Open Source CMS

Filed under
OSS
Drupal

A content management system (CMS is a computer application that allows publishing, editing and modifying content, organizing, deleting as

well as maintenance from a central interface. CMS’s are often used to run websites containing blogs, news, and shopping. Many corporate and marketing websites use CMS’s. CMS’s typically aim to avoid the need for hand coding, but may support it for specific elements or entire pages.

Read more

BitPay’s Copay Open Source Multisig Wallet Launches in Beta

Filed under
OSS

Metaswitch Contributes Virtualised Network Code To Open Source

Filed under
OSS

UK-based Metaswitch Networks has given away some of its network virtualization code to the open source community, designating it as Project Calico.

The technology integrates with OpenStack and provides the framework for orchestrated IP routing between virtual machines (VMs) and host machines, along with internal and inter-data centre interconnects. It describes Layer 3 virtualisation techniques, and is aimed at large cloud data centres.

Read more

LinkedIn behind the scenes: How open source software can transform a company – and the world

Filed under
OSS

Open source also helps the branding of our engineering team – the fact that we work on world-class technical problems, the scale of the problems we have to solve, and the complexity of the features that we’re building. Being able to showcase our technology to the world is something that hopefully is going to be attractive to world class engineers around the world, which we would love to have work for us.

Read more

EU's Anti-Open Source Approach to Procurement

Filed under
OSS

In recent posts, I've looked at the increasing use of open source software by governments in countries as diverse as China, Russia, India and Germany. Here I want to contrast those moves with the continuing failure of the European Commission to embrace free software - with huge costs for European citizens as a result, to say nothing of lost sovereignty.

Read more

AMD Publishes Open-Source Linux HSA Kernel Driver

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
OSS

AMD has just published a massive patch-set for the Linux kernel that finally implements a HSA (Heterogeneous System Architecture) in open-source. The set of 83 patches implement a Linux HSA driver for Radeon family GPUs and serves too as a sample driver for other HSA-compatible devices. This big driver in part is what well known Phoronix contributor John Bridgman has been working on at AMD.

Read more

The open source movement at IIT Bombay

Filed under
OSS

Professor Kannan Moudgalya, IIT Bombay says, “Free and Open Source Software (FOSS) also offers the nation an opportunity to save on precious foreign exchange. It is estimated that proprietary software purchases cost our nation of the order of a billion dollars per year, most of which goes to buy basic software like MS Windows and MS Office. This can easily be saved by switching over to Linux and a FOSS office suite, such as LibreOffice. In general, FOSS based software development keeps the cost low for the developer and the end user and this is most appropriate for our IT entrepreneurs, whose main investment is the idea and the time spent. This can reduce the cost of development of software and make Indian companies competitive in global market place. India has a cost advantage in terms of labour arbitrage. Proprietary software disturbs this cost advantage by imposing huge overheads. Choosing FOSS can help India leverage its demographic dividend, by reducing avoidable and unnecessary additional costs, without compromising on quality in the least bit.”

Read more

It's better to share with functional programming

Filed under
Interviews
OSS

Katie Miller is a Developer Advocate at Red Hat for the open source Platform as a Service, OpenShift, and co-founder of the Lambda Ladies group for women in functional programming. She has a passion for language and linguistics, but also for the open source way.

I have a Red Hat sticker on my laptop that simply says: It's better to share.

In this interview, Katie shares with me how she moved from journalism to a job in technology. Also, how she got introduced to functional programming, the Haskell programming language, and how open source is part of her daily life.

Read more

Why is Docker the new craze in virtualization and cloud computing?

Filed under
Linux
Interviews
OSS

It's OSCON time again, and this year the tech sector is abuzz with talk of cloud infrastructure. One of the more interesting startups is Docker, an ultra-lightweight containerization app that's brimming with potential

I caught up with the VP of Services for Docker, James Turnbull, who'll be running a Docker crash course at the con. Besides finding out what Docker is anyway, we discussed the cloud, open source contributing, and getting a real job.

Read more

Syndicate content