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OSS

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

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OSS
  • Open source job market booming

    Recruiting open source talent is a top priority for IT recruiters and hiring managers in 2016. According to the 2016 Open Source Jobs Report released today by IT hiring platform Dice.com and The Linux Foundation, 65 percent of hiring managers say open source hiring will increase more than any other part of their business over the next six months, and 79 percent of hiring managers have increased incentives to hold on to their current open source professionals.

  • Open Source Horizon Claims Edge over Google's Firebase Mobile Back-End

    Much fanfare accompanied Google's elevation of its Firebase mobile back-end platform last week, but slipping under the radar was the quieter unveiling of Horizon, an open source JavaScript back-end for Web and mobile apps that claims advantages over Firebase.

  • Linksys WRT routers won't block open-source firmware under new FCC rules

    On June 2, new Federal Communication Commission (FCC) rules will force router manufacturers to limit what can be done with their hardware. Only Linksys is ready with a solution for open-source firmware. TP-Link is taking the easy way out by blocking third-party firmware on its routers, and other router manufacturers are quietly following in its footsteps.

  • Open source tool manages AWS Lambda apps

    A new open source project from Express and Node.js-canvas creator TJ Holowaychuk lets developers create, deploy, and manage AWS Lambda functions from a command-line tool.

  • DevConMru 2016, day 2 – Linux Installfest

    It was Saturday morning and I found myself rushing to be at Flying Dodo just in time.

  • How Netflix Leverages Big Data - Brian Sullivan, Director of Streaming Analytics, Netflix
  • Design Summit evolution, operating at scale, and more OpenStack news
  • The Month of LibreOffice

    It also helps spread the word about LibreOffice. Remember, Free/Libre & Open Source Software does not directly produce products. Rather, it develops and releases software through community of contributors, that may then be monetized in one way or another – or perhaps not at all. In other words, this means that the distinction between outbound and inbound marketing that is commonly found in the corporate world is more blurry as any user is also a potential contributor. Marketing our community really means marketing LibreOffice itself. This is what we’re doing this month and it makes me happy. I’m excited at the stats and figures that we will draw from this experiment. If you happen to be a LibreOffice contributor, or just a fan of LibreOffice, you could get a badge. All you need is to contribute to the project in one of the several ways described here and it will be awarded to you: remember, we’re already at the end of the month!

  • Learn about Apache Mesos and the State of the Art of Microservices from Twitter, Uber, Netflix
  • Wayland/Weston with XWayland works on DragonFly

    DragonFlyBSD user karu.pruun compiled Xorg with XWayland support and made it work with many applications that need Xorg work now with wayland/weston. It’s success because of XWayland support has been merged in the master X.Org branch. Still there will be a compatibility issue with Wayland which will not work properly alone as X window systems.

  • Open Source Everything Engineering (OSEE) — a Nordic Manifesto
  • Open Source Everything Engineering

    It’s a sweeping socialist concept but it makes good sense, sharing the wealth and keeping us all safe. FLOSS is a much narrower concept but it does the same thing, allow the whole world to create and to use software. Why not engineering and governance?

EnterpriseDB/Postgres

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OSS

OSS in Networking

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OSS

All About the DC/OS Open Source Project

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Interviews
OSS

The DC/OS project is a software platform that’s comprised entirely of open source technologies. It includes some existing technologies like Apache Mesos and Marathon, which were always open source, but also includes newer proprietary components developed by Mesosphere that we’ve donated to the community and which are fully open sourced under an Apache 2.0 license. Features include easy install of DC/OS itself (including all the components), plus push-button, app-store-like installation of complex distributed systems (including Apache Spark, Apache Kafka, Apache Cassandra and more) via our Universe “distributed services app store”. We’re also tightly integrating our popular Marathon container-orchestration technology right into DC/OS, as the default method for managing Docker containers and other long-running services (including traditional non-containerized web applications, as well stateful services such as databases).

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Smartwatches go open source

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OSS

Until now, the open source community has largely been left behind when it comes to the world of smartwatch operating systems. With Google and Apple leading the charge in this field, there’s been little competition, and any independent launches have been heavily restricted in what they can do. However, we now finally have a choice with the launch of AsteroidOS.

Developed by Florent Revest, AsteroidOS is the first true open source distribution that’s been specifically made for smartwatches. In its current state, AsteroidOS contains only the bare minimum of functions. So things like a calculator, stopwatch and calendar are all ready to use, but many of the smartphone connection features we’ve become accustomed to are not.

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Open Source Governance: Creating a Prosperous World at Peace

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OSS

Open source solutions – primarily in software but increasingly also in hardware – cost roughly one tenth of proprietary offerings. The switch to open source software enables financial and public service scalability as well as quality sustainability at all levels of governance. Unfortunately this understanding is not widespread.

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Leftovers: OSS

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OSS
  • 19 years later, The Cathedral and the Bazaar still moves us

    Nineteen years ago this week, at an annual meeting of Linux-Kongress in Bavaria, an American programmer named Eric Raymond delivered the first version of a working paper he called "The Cathedral and the Bazaar." According to Raymond, the exploratory and largely speculative account of some curious new programming practices contained "no really fundamental discovery."

    But it brought the house down.

    "The fact that it was received with rapt attention and thunderous applause by an audience in which there were very few native speakers of English seemed to confirm that I was onto something," Raymond wrote a year later, as his treatise blossomed into a book. Nearly two decades after that early-evening presentation in Bavaria, The Cathedral and the Bazaar continues to move people. Now, however, it's not so much a crystal ball as it is an historical document, a kind of Urtext that chronicles the primordial days of a movement—something Raymond and his boosters would eventually call "open source." The paper's role in Netscape's decision to release the source code for its web browser has cemented its place in the annals of software history. References to it are all but inescapable.

  • Time to choose: Are you investing in open source or not?

    In 1996, the term "open source" didn't exist. Yet 20 years later, open source technology spans countless projects and brings together the collective talent of millions. Take a close look at any open source project or community of developers and you'll find incredible levels of speed, innovation, and agility.

    Open source participation varies wildly. Some developers devote their professional lives to open source software projects; others contribute their time and talent as an avocation. While the communities behind the software continue to grow, the technology itself is playing both a foundational role in the most important technology developments of the past 20 years and is also an integral role in the strategies powering many of today's leading organizations.

  • Open Source Employment Trends

    We often think of open source as a volunteer or community based activity community. However open source is increasingly important to companies who need to keep up with new technologies.

    The latest survey from Dice and The Linux Foundation goes beyond Linux to examine trends in open source recruiting and job seeking. The report is based on responses from more than 400 hiring managers at corporations, small and medium businesses (SMBs), government organizations, and staffing agencies across the globe and from more than 4,500 open source professionals worldwide.

  • 10 most in-demand Internet of things skills

    The Internet of things is ramping up into a multi-billion dollar industry and with it goes demand for employees with IoT skills. Here we look at the skills that employers want

Made-in-Vietnam open-source software supports IPv6

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OSS

At first, NukeViet was used to build websites and publish content on internet.

However, since the NukeViet 3.0 version launched in 2010, NukeViet has been developed to serve as a platform for the development of web-based apps.

NukeViet now has many different products, including NukeViet CMS used to operate news websites, NukeViet Portal used to make business information portals, and NukeViet Edu Gate – the information portal solution for education departments, and NukeViet Shop, used to build online sale websites.

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Time to choose: Are you investing in open source or not?

Filed under
OSS

In 1996, the term "open source" didn't exist. Yet 20 years later, open source technology spans countless projects and brings together the collective talent of millions. Take a close look at any open source project or community of developers and you'll find incredible levels of speed, innovation, and agility.

Open source participation varies wildly. Some developers devote their professional lives to open source software projects; others contribute their time and talent as an avocation. While the communities behind the software continue to grow, the technology itself is playing both a foundational role in the most important technology developments of the past 20 years and is also an integral role in the strategies powering many of today's leading organizations.

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Leftovers: OSS

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OSS
  • DORS/CLUC 2016 - Event Report

    Between 11-13 May 2016, Zacharias Mitzelos and I had been to Zagreb, Croatia for the 23rd DORS/CLUC. We were joined by Elio Qoshi, Jona Azizaj from Albania and Gergely Rakosi from Hungary.

  • CSS coding techniques

    Lately, we have seen a lot of people struggling with CSS, from beginners to seasoned developers. Some of them don’t like the way it works, and wonder if replacing CSS with a different language would be better—CSS processors emerged from this thinking. Some use CSS frameworks in the hopes that they will have to write less code (we have seen in a previous article why this is usually not the case). Some are starting to ditch CSS altogether and use JavaScript to apply styles.

  • ODPi and ASF: Building a Stronger Hadoop Ecosystem - John Mertic
  • Spark 2.0 - Ion Stoica, Co-founder & Executive Chairman, Databricks
  • LibreOffice Viewer - tested.
  • Enforcement and compliance for the GPL and similar licenses

    The Free Software Legal & Licensing Workshop (LLW) is a three-day event held every year for legal professionals (and aficionados) who work in the realm of free and open-source software (FOSS). It is organized by the Free Software Foundation Europe (FSFE) and, this year, the event was held in Barcelona (Spain), April 13-15. The topics covered during the event ranged from determining what constitutes authorship, how to attribute it, and what is copyrightable, to the complexity of licenses and how to make them more accessible for potential licensees lacking in legal background. In addition, license enforcement and compliance were discussed, with a particular focus on how the GPL and related licenses have done in court.

    According to the organizers, there were approximately 90 attendees, 70% of whom were legal professionals and 30% technical professionals linked in some way to legal matters in their communities or companies. Attendees came from legal firms, traditionally open-source companies and communities, such as the Linux Foundation, Red Hat, and Debian, tech companies with some open-source products (Intel and others), and companies that are using open-source software embedded in their products. Discussions were held under the Chatham House Rule, which means that names and affiliations of participants are only available for those who have explicitly agreed.

  • ReText and Markdown

    Markup formats can inspire just as much devotion and loathing as programming languages. TeX versus HTML, DocBook versus Mallard—the list is probably endless. But the "lightweight" markup formats (Markdown, reStructuredText, AsciiDoc, and so on) are the subject of particular scrutiny. Users almost always write them by hand, not in a dedicated tool, and the formats are becoming ever more widespread: as input formats in web applications and as the preferred document format on sites like GitHub. But these lightweight formats, Markdown in particular, have developed a reputation for compatibility problems in recent years—see the CommonMark effort for one of several attempts to impose order on the chaos. Thus, when version 6.0 of ReText, a GUI editor for Markdown and reStructuredText documents, was released recently, I was curious enough to take a look.

  • Embrace Open Source culture: the 5 common transformations.

    This is a story of what I have lived or witnessed a few times so far. A story of an organization that used to consume, develop and ship proprietary software for many years. At some point in time, management took the decision of using Open Source. Like in most cases, the decision was forced by its customers, providers, competitors... and by numbers.

    [...]

    This organization gained control over its production and, by consuming Open Source, it could focus many resources in differentiation, without changing the structure, development and delivery processes. At some point, it was shipping products that involved a significant percentage of generic software taken “from internet”.

    It became an Open Source producer.

    You can recognise such organizations they frequently create a specific group, usually linked to R&D, in change of brining all the innovation that is happening "in the Open Source community" into the organization.

    Little by little this organisation realised that giving fast and satisfactory answers, to its customer demands became more and more expensive. They got stuck in what rapidly became an old kernel or tool chain version.... Bringing innovation from “the community” required back-porting, solving complex integration issues, incompatibilities with what your provider brings, what your customer wants.

  • The rise of APIs

    It’s been almost five years since we heard that “software is eating the world.” The number of SaaS applications has exploded and there is a rising wave of software innovation in the area of APIs that provide critical connective tissue and increasingly important functionality. There has been a proliferation of third-party API companies, which is fundamentally changing the dynamics of how software is created and brought to market.

    The application programming interface (API) has been a key part of software development for decades as a way to develop for a specific platform, such as Microsoft Windows. More recently, newer platform providers, from Salesforce to Facebook and Google, have offered APIs that help the developer and have, in effect, created a developer dependency on these platforms.

  • How expiring patents are ushering in the next generation of 3D printing

    The year 2016 is quickly shaping up to be one of the hottest years on record for 3D printing innovations. Although there is still a lot of hype surrounding 3D printing and how it may or may not be the next industrial revolution, one thing is for certain: the cost of printing will continue to drop while the quality of 3D prints continues to rise.

    This development can be traced to advanced 3D printing technologies becoming accessible due to the expiration of key patents on pre-existing industrial printing processes.

  • Hackaday Prize Entry: Open Source Electrospinning Machine

    Electrospinning is a fascinating process where a high voltage potential is applied between a conductive emitter nozzle and a collector screen. A polymer solution is then slowly dispensed from the nozzle. The repulsion of negative charges in the solution forces fine fibers emanate from the liquid. Those fibers are then rapidly accelerated towards the collector screen by the electric field while being stretched and thinned down to a few hundred nanometers in diameter. The large surface area of the fine fibers lets them dry during their flight towards the collector screen, where they build up to a fine, fabric-like material. We’ve noticed that electrospinning is hoped to enable fully automated manufacturing of wearable textiles in the future.

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More in Tux Machines

Android/Chromebook

  • No more Android Wear watches says Samsung, Tizen all the way !
    Samsung has been getting pretty serious about its Smartwatches and has certainly excelled with its latest creation, the Tizen based Gear S2. The company has had a little dabble with Android wear in the past, with the Galaxy Gear Live, and since has been focusing on Tizen. According to a report from Fast Company stating that “no more Samsung Android Wear devices are in development or being planned.” This is according to a Samsung executive. The report goes further to say that Samsung executives are going with Tizen because it’s “far more battery-efficient than Android Wear” and “the standard OS on other Samsung products from TVs to refrigerators.”
  • Are games too easy to pirate on Android?
    It's long been known that game developers make much more money on iOS than they do on Google's Android platform. The most recent example of this is Monument Valley. The developers of the game posted an article on Medium with infographics that show that 73% of their revenue comes from iOS, while only 17% comes from Android.
  • Google Trust API Will Replace Your Passwords With A ‘Trust Score’
    In the wake of increasing security threats and password leaks, Google is working on Project Abacus that will introduce Trust API in Android devices. This API will calculate your Trust Score and use them to give you access to various services. This score will be calculated by using a variety of user patterns.
  • Monument Valley in Numbers: Year 2
  • And the winners of the Google Play Awards are…
  • Why are Chromebooks outselling Macs?
  • Fancy ChromiumOS, Ubuntu, And Android TV All-In-One System
    If you are looking for a mini PC that is capable of running ChromiumOS, Ubuntu LTS, and Android TV operating systems, you may be interested in a new mini desktop computer system that has been created by Dylan Callahan. The Fancy mini PC is a “handcrafted personal computer” that is now available to purchase price to $225 plus shipping and is powered by a Quad Core x86 2.0 Ghz processor supported by 4K AMD Radeon graphics that is supported by 4GB of DDR3 RAM.

Leftovers: OSS

  • Linksys Sees Value Open Source Market for WRT Wireless Routers
    The wireless router world remains safe for open source -- at least for users of certain Linksys Wi-Fi devices, which will still allow the installation of open source firmware like DD-WRT after new FCC rules take effect next week. Here's the back story: Last fall, the Federal Communications Commissions (FCC) introduced new regulations that required device manufacturers to ensure "that third parties are not able to reprogram the device to operate outside the parameters for which the device was certified." Those rules go into effect June 2.
  • Keynote: How Enterprises are Leveraging Open Source Analytics Platforms
    In this Keynote, Luciano Resende, Architect, Spark Technology Center at IBM, will showcase Open source Analytic platforms. Luciano will also discuss how they are being leveraged by different organizations to upend their competition, as well as enable new use cases.
  • Verizon’s Open Source Network Points Way For Enterprises
  • An open source toolbox for pure mathematics
    The field of pure mathematics has always depended on computers to make tables, prove theorems and explore new theories. Today, computer aided experiments and the use of databases relying on computer calculations are part of the pure mathematician's standard toolbox. In fact, these tools have become so important that some areas of mathematics are now completely dependent on them.
  • Asa Dotzler: My New Role @ Mozilla
    After a couple of years working on Mozilla’s mobile operating system project, I’m coming back to Firefox! I’ll be doing some familiar things and some new things. My official title is Product Manager, Firefox Roadmap and Community. What that means, first and foremost, is that I’ll be returning as our storyteller, making sure that we’re communicating regularly about where Firefox is heading, and that we’re fully engaged with Firefox users, fans, and contributors.

Big Data and Databases

Openwashing