Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

OSS

13 Free Open-source Content Management Systems

Filed under
Server
OSS

WordPress launched in 2003 as a blogging platform. Today, WordPress is a sophisticated content management system, built on PHP and MySQL and running much of the websites worldwide, from hobby blogs to the biggest news portals. Over 54,000 plugins and themes help customize WordPress installations — including robust ecommerce functionality, galleries, mailing lists, forums, and analytics. Price: Free.

Read more

Also: WordPress vs. Wix vs. Squarespace for SEO: An Interview with Pam Aungst

Openwashing, Microsoft Censorship of FOSS, and Microsoft Making Traps 'Open'

Filed under
Microsoft
OSS

OSS Leftovers

Filed under
OSS
  • These Weeks in Firefox: Issue 60
  • Sweden’s digitalisation hub adopts open source policy [iophk: DIGG includes a bit of licensing FUD against GPL and copyleft]

                       

                         

    DIGG (Myndigheten för digital förvaltning, or agency for digital government) was founded in September 2018.
     

                         

    Its open source software development policy aims to standardise and regulate ownership and set the conditions for sharing.

  • University of California Loses Access to New Content in Elsevier Journals

    In a statement released Wednesday, UC’s Academic Council encouraged those at the university who might require access to Elsevier’s content to use alternative access methods, such as online repositories where authors deposit free-to-read copies of their papers, and to “refrain from any new independent subscriptions to Elsevier journals.”

    Over the last few months, Elsevier has established nationwide licensing agreements in Norway and Poland, and is close to making such a deal in Hungary. However, it remains in a stalemate in negotiations with consortia of libraries and research institutions in Germany and Sweden. Those groups have also cancelled their subscriptions with the publisher.

OSS Leftovers

Filed under
OSS
  • A Diatribe Concerning My Experiences With Gopher

    This is an article that will collect my opinions concerning Gopher experiences and practices, primarily those I dislike, with regards to conventions I've encountered and whatnot. I'll update this article as I have more to write of and feel the want.

  • A Look at the Open-Source Tools Behind Today’s State-of-the-Art Visual Effects

    Today, Software Defined Visualization (SDVis) is the ultimate in the world of visualization, allowing the best-of-the-best to emerge. It’s hardly a secret in the world of scientific visualization, digital animation, and computer graphics (CG). Go to any hit movie these days, and the results of SDVis will be present to help make the incredible believable.

  • Arturo Borrero González: Netfilter workshop 2019 Malaga summary

    This week we had the annual Netfilter Workshop. This time the venue was in Malaga (Spain). We had the hotel right in the Malaga downtown and the meeting room was in University ETSII Malaga. We had plenty of talks, sessions, discussions and debates, and I will try to summarice in this post what it was about.

    Florian Westphal, Linux kernel hacker, Netfilter coreteam member and engineer from Red Hat, started with a talk related the some works being done in the core of the Netfilter code in the kernel to convert packet processing to lists. He shared an overview of current problems and challenges. Processing in a list rather than per packet seems to have several benefits: code can be smarter and faster, so this seems like a good improvement. On the other hand, Florian thinks some of the pain to refactor all the code may not worth it. Other approaches may be considered to introduce even more fast forwarding paths (apart from the flow table mechanisms for example which is already available).

    Florian also followed up with the next topic: testing. We are starting to have a lot of duplicated code to do testing. Suggestion by Pablo is to introduce some dedicated tools to ease in maintenance and testing itself. Special mentions to nfqueue and tproxy, 2 mechanisms that requires quite a bit of code to be well tested (and could be hard to setup anyway).

    [...]

    After lunch, Pablo followed up with a status update on hardware flow offload capabilities for nftables. He started with an overview of the current status of ethtool_rx and tc offloads, capabilities and limitations. It should be possible for most commodity hardware to support some variable amount of offload capabilities, but apparently the code was not in very good shape. The new flow block API should improve this situation, while also giving support for nftables offload. Related article in LWN: https://lwn.net/Articles/793080/

    Next talk was by Phil, engineer at Red Hat. He commented on user-defined strings in nftables, which presents some challenges. Some debate happened, mostly to get to an agreement on how to proceed.

  • QMO: Firefox Nightly 70 Testday, July 19th

    We are happy to let you know that Friday, July 19th, we are organizing Firefox Nightly 70 Testday. We’ll be focusing our testing on: Fission.

  • This free open-source tool can help game developers make procedural ivy [Ed: Mono is a problem]

    This is a tool specifically for games being made in Unity, an engine which has been used to make plenty of games people don't associate with it—games like Hearthstone, Cities: Skylines, Wasteland 2, Beat Saber, and Cuphead, for instance, were all made in Unity.

  • Popular licenses in OpenAPI

    Note: Before you start complaining, I realise this is probably a very sub-optimal solution code-wise, but it worked for me. In my defence, I did open up my copy of the Sed & Awk Pocket Reference before my eyes went all glassy and I hacked up the following ugly method. Also note that the shell scripts are in Fish shell and may not work directly in a 100% POSIX shell.

    First, I needed to get a data set to work on. Hat-tip to Mike Ralphson for pointing me to APIs Guru as a good resource. I analysed their APIs-guru/openapi-directory repository1, where in the APIs folder they keep a big collection of public APIs. Most of them following the OpenAPI (previously Swagger) specification.

  • Infinite work is less work
    The first task of last week's Perl Weekly Challenge was to print the
    first ten strong and weak primes. A prime pn is "strong" if it's larger
    than the average of its two neighbouring primes (i.e. pn > (pn-1+pn+1)/2).
    A prime is "weak" if it's smaller than the average of its two neighbours.
    
    Of course, this challenge would be trivial if we happened to have a list
    of all the prime numbers. Then we'd just filter out the first ten that
    are strong, and the first ten that are weak. In fact, it would be even
    easier if we happened to have a list of all the strong primes, and a
    list of all the weak ones. Then we'd just print the first ten of each.
    
    But there are an infinite number of primes and of weak primes (and
    possibly of strong primes too, though that's still only conjectured),
    so building a complete list of the various subspecies of primes 
    is impractical in most programming languages.
    
    
    

What is the Open Document Format (ODF), and how is it developed?

Filed under
LibO
OSS

Open Document Format is LibreOffice’s native file format. (If you have a file with a .odt, .ods, .odp or .odg extension, then it’s an Open Document Text, Spreadsheet or Presentation file or Graphic respectively.)

ODF is developed by OASIS, then submitted to ISO (the International Organization for Standardization), and then adopted as a standard. There is also a working group at ISO, which by the way also works on OOXML – which can then ask questions about development, and so on.

For ODF we are now working on version 1.3. We had a “feature freeze” last summer. We have come so far that everything we wanted to have in it is available in the “editor version”. Now we’re going to fine-tune it, then we’ll be back in summer – so that was a whole year. Then comes the coordination process at OASIS, so it usually takes two years until a new version of the standard is ready.

Read more

Events: Akademy 2019, GUADEC 2019, SUSE, Linux Plumbers Conference

Filed under
KDE
OSS
GNOME
  • Akademy 2019: Talk Schedule is out!

    On day one (Saturday, September 7), the teams that have been working on the community goals over the last two years will discuss how things worked out and what has been achieved (spoiler: a lot). As many of the procedures and processes developed for the goals have now been worked into the everyday ways the KDE community operates and builds things, it is time to look for new goals. That is precisely what will be happening next, when the panel unveils what the community has decided to work on in the next two years.

    Apart from goals, there will also be time for the bleeding-edge tech KDE is so well-known for. You will find out from Aleix Pol how developers managed to make a complex graphical environment like the Plasma desktop start up faster, and Marco Martin and Bhushan Shah will show us how Plasma can work everywhere, including on embedded devices. Taking things a step further still, Aditya Mehra will demonstrate how the open source Mycroft AI assistant can be the next great thing to assist you while you drive your car.

  • Felipe Borges: Newcomers workshop @ GUADEC 2019

    This year’s GUADEC is approaching and I can already feel people’s excitement while talking about our annual conference. It is important that we benefit from having so many GNOMies together in the same location to help the next generation to get started in our project. For this reason, we are planning a workshop during the first day of the BoFs (check our wiki page for more info).

    The Newcomers Workshop aims at helping newcomers solve their first Gitlab issue. Historically, Carlos Soriano has championed the initiative (thank Carlos when you see him) and I have participated, guiding dozens of people in the universities here in Brno. In the past, other community members were organizing the workshop all over the world. We plan to expand the initiative by having even more GNOME contributors organizing similar events at a local level.

  • Webinar – Multimodal OS: SUSE Linux Enterprise 15 Service Pack 1
  • Customize your Cloud Foundry UI through Stratos extension framework

    At the recent Cloud Foundry Summit in Philadephia, Troy Topnik of SUSE and Bo Yang of IBM discussed how to use the open source Stratos UI’s extension framework to add new features such as autoscaling policies, allowing users to view and query application metrics and scaling events in the Stratos application dashboard with a consistent user experience. This is a great opportunity to learn about how Stratos and how it can be easily customized for Cloud Foundry deployments.

  • Linux Plumbers Conference: Power Management and Thermal Control Microconference Accepted into 2019 Linux Plumbers Conference

    We are pleased to announce that the Power Management and Thermal Control Microconference has been accepted into the 2019 Linux Plumbers Conference! Power management and thermal control are important areas in the Linux ecosystem to help improve the environment of the planet. In recent years, computer systems have been becoming more and more complex and thermally challenged at the same time and the energy efficiency expectations regarding them have been growing. This trend is likely to continue in the foreseeable future and despite the progress made in the power-management and thermal-control problem space since the Linux Plumbers Conference last year. That progress includes, but is not limited to, the merging of the energy-aware scheduling patch series and CPU idle-time management improvements; there will be more work to do in those areas. This gathering will focus on continuing to have Linux meet the power-management and thermal-control challenge.

Write a Novel with Open Source Tool

Filed under
Software
OSS

If you are looking for an open source tool to help you write your next novel, bibisco, ManusKript, and Plume Creator can help you get started.

Aspiring writers have no shortage of software that is supposed to help them along the road to a finished manuscript. Whether they are writing a short story or a multi-volume series, this software promises to organize them by providing software and revisable outlines, as well as a supposedly distraction-free full-screen mode and databases for characters, settings, objects, and drafts. On Windows and Mac, the leading software is Scrivener. However, since a Linux version of Scrivener has yet to reach general release, open source alternatives have sprung up like bibisco, Manuskript, and Plume Creator, each with its own approach to writing and outlining.

Read more

The state of open source GPU drivers on Arm in 2019

Filed under
OSS

I first blogged about the state of open source drivers for Arm GPUs 7 years ago, in January 2012, and then again in September 2017. I’ve had a few requests since then to provide an update but I’ve not bothered because there’s really been no real change in the last few years, that is until now!

So the big positive change is that there’s two new open drivers om the scene with the panfrost and lima drivers. Panfrost is a reverse engineered driver for the newer Midguard and Bitfrost series of Mali GPUs designed/licensed by Arm, whereas Lima is aimed at the older Utguard series Mali 4xx series of devices. Panfrost, started by Alyssa Rosenzweig, and now has quite a large contributor base, has over the last few months has been coming along leaps and bounds and by the time Mesa 19.2 is out I suspect it should be able to run gnome-shell on an initial set of devices. I’m less certain the state of Lima. The drivers landed in the kernel in the 5.2 development cycle, which Linus just released. On the userspace side they landed in the mesa 19.1 development cycle, but they’ve greatly improving in mesa 19.2 cycle. Of course they’re all enabled in Fedora rawhide, although I don’t expect them to be really testable until later in the 19.2 cycle, but it makes it easy for early adopters who know they’re doing to be able to start to play.

Read more

Upcoming SPI board elections for 2019

Filed under
OSS

Hi everyone. This is a heads up about the upcoming SPI board
elections. The primary purpose of this notice is to give some time to
people to think about running for a board position. We have three
seats available for a three year term:

* President
* General board member
* General board member

The formal nomination period will open on Monday, 1st July 2019 and
run for a bit over two weeks. Elections, if required, will then run
and results annouanced at the end of the month.

* Monday July 1st 2019 00:00 UTC - Nominations open
* Monday July 15th 2019 23:59 UTC - Nominations close
* Wednesday July 17th 2019 00:00 UTC - Voting commences 
* Tuesday July 30th 2019 23:59 UTC - Voting closes
* Wednesday July 31st 2019 UTC - Results announced

Potential board members should be able to commit to attending the
monthly board meetings, which are conducted publicly via IRC (#spi on
the OFTC network).  These take place at 20:00 UTC on the second
Monday of every month.  More details, including all past agendas and
minutes, can be found at http://spi-inc.org/meetings/

The ideal candidate will have an existing involvement in the Free and
Open Source community, though this need not be with a project
affiliated with SPI.

Please do take the opportunity to ask any questions you may have about
SPI board membership on the spi-general mailing list before the formal
nomination period opens.  You can also find various board members
present on #spi on irc.spi-inc.org (OFTC).


Tim Potter
Secretary, Software in the Public Interest, Inc.

Read more

Also: Software in the Public Interest board elections

Open education: There isn't an app for that

Filed under
OSS

Open source software has saved my district—Penn Manor School District in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania—more than a million dollars on its technology budget. But more importantly, making a deliberate and concerted effort to infuse open principles and practices into our learning environments has cultivated a vibrant and inclusive learning community that cuts across the school. And as a result, student success has exceeded our expectations.

But how do schools put open ideas into practice to foster future innovators and leaders? It's not as simple as installing Linux on 4,000 student laptops, holding hands, and singing the alma mater in the high school cafeteria.

An open schoolhouse values all learners' unique strengths and passions to help them reach their potential. This work does not begin and end with curricula, worksheets, and test scores. It starts with building connections, relationships, and trust with students. In this article, I'll explain how we put these ideas into practice.

Read more

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Today in Techrights

8 Top Ubuntu server Web GUI Management Panels

Ubuntu Server with command-line interface might sound little bit wired to newbies because of no previous familiarization. Thus, if you are new to Ubuntu Linux server running on your local hardware or some Cloud hosting and planning to install some Linux Desktop Graphical environment (GUI) over it; I would like to recommend don’t, until and unless you don’t have supported hardware. Instead, think about free and open-source Ubuntu server Web GUI Management panels. Moreover, for a moment, you can think about Desktop Graphical environment for your local server but if you have some Linux cloud hosting server, never do it. I am saying this because Ubuntu or any other Linux server operating systems are built to run on low hardware resources, thus even old computer/server hardware can easily handle it. GUI means more RAM and hard disk storage space. Read more

Android Leftovers

Ubuntu 18.10 Cosmic Cuttlefish reaches end of life on Thursday, upgrade now

Canonical, earlier this month, announced that Ubuntu 18.10 Cosmic Cuttlefish will be reaching end-of-life status this Thursday, making now the ideal time to upgrade to a later version. As with all non-Long Term Support (LTS) releases, 18.10 had nine months of support following its release last October. When distributions reach their end-of-life stage, they no longer receive security updates. While you may be relatively safe at first, the longer you keep running an unpatched system, the more likely it is that your system will become compromised putting your data at risk. If you’d like to move on from Ubuntu 18.10, you’ve got two options; you can either perform a clean install of a more up-to-date version of Ubuntu or you can do an in-place upgrade. Read more