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OSS

18 Frameworks, Libraries, and Projects for Building Medical Applications

Filed under
OSS

Open-source is not just a license or a code-based that left free on an online repository, It's a complete concept which comes with several advantages. Moreover, the most advantage you can get from Open-source is beyond the open-code it's FREEDOM; freedom to use or re-shape it as you see fit within your project commercial or otherwise, and that depends on the license of course. You are free from the headache of license conflict legal problems but also from the dilemma of dealing with restrections and limitations which come with property licenses.

You are free from the system lock-in schemes, furthermore, you own your data, and freedom to customize the software as your structure requires and workflow demands.

The Community:

The Open-source project gains a powerful community as they gain users, the community users vary between advanced users, end-users, developers and end-users on decision-making level.

Many of the community users are providing quality inputs from their usage and customized use-case and workflow or test-runs, Furthermore, they always have something to add as new features, UI modification, different usability setup, and overall introducing new workflows and tools, and That's what makes the progress of the open-source different than non-free solutions.

While, Good community means good support, The community is a good resource to hire advanced users, developers, and system experts. It also provides alternative options when hiring developers. Unlike non-free software which are not blessed with such communities and where the options there are limited, The rich open-source community provides rich questions and answers sets that contributed by users from all around the world.

Higher education value for the in-house team

The open-source concept itself provides educational value, I owe most of what I know to open-source communities.The access to the source code and open-channels communication with the core developers is the best educational value any developer can get.

Read more

Review: Haiku R1 beta 2

Filed under
OS
OSS
Reviews

Haiku is an open-source operating system that specifically targets personal computing. Inspired by the Be Operating System (BeOS), Haiku aims to be fast, efficient, simple to use, and easy to learn. It is specifically geared toward desktop usage and maintaining a responsive desktop environment.

The Haiku project has been, to date, in perpetual development mode. Which is to say the releases to date have been labelled as being alpha or beta releases. I mention this because while the version label is R1 beta 2, the platform should probably be regarded a relatively mature project with the benefit of nearly 20 years of development behind it.

The R1 beta 2 release includes a number of new features such as improved font scaling and HiDPI support, along with the ability to work with mouse devices that offer more than three buttons. More applications have been ported and are now available through the project's software manager. The installer has mostly remained the same, however users can now exclude the installation of optional packages while setting up Haiku. New driver support has been added and there are some new options for keeping the Deskbar (a sort of combined desktop panel and system tray) out of the way.

The project's latest release is available in 32-bit (x86) and 64-bit (x86_64) builds. There are also builds for ARM, PowerPC, m68k, and SPARC architectures, however these builds are considered to be unsupported. I downloaded the 64-bit build which is available as a 955MB ZIP file. Unpacking the ZIP file presents us with a 1,108MB (1GB) ISO file we can write to optical media or a thumb drive.

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The 10 Best Weather Tools for Linux System in 2020

Filed under
Linux
OSS

With the advancement of computers and the internet, we don’t need to look at the television screen or newspaper for weather updates. Rather, we can just pick our phone and get to know the current weather. Even if we are working on our Linux desktop, we can get notified about the forecastings. Thanks to the weather tools for Linux.

Most of the modern Linux distributions come with a default weather app. Yet some distros lack this feature by default. These weather tools can show you a plethora of weather parameters by using the API keys of third-party weather info providers. You just need an internet connection, and you are good to go. Now you don’t need to worry about whether you should take the umbrella with you while going out.

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7 Best Open Source “Disk Cloning/Backup” Tools for Linux Servers

Filed under
Linux
OSS

Disk cloning is the process of copying data from a hard disk to another one, in fact, you can do this process by copy & paste but you won’t be able to copy the hidden files and folders or the in-use files, that’s why you need a cloning software to do the job, also you may need the cloning process to save a backup image from your files and folders.

Basically, the cloning software job is to take all disk data, convert them into a single .img file and give it to you, so you can copy it to another hard drive, and here we have the best 7 Open Source Cloning software to do the job for you.

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Why we open sourced our Python platform

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OSS

The team at Anvil recently open sourced the Anvil App Server, a runtime engine for hosting web apps built entirely in Python.

The community reaction has been overwhelmingly positive, and we, at Anvil, have already incorporated lots of that feedback into our next release. But one of the questions we keep getting asked is, "Why did you choose to open source such a core part of your product?"

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Linux Candy: Buoh – online strips comics reader

Filed under
Linux
OSS

Who loves eye candy? Don’t be shy — you can raise both hands!!

Linux Candy is a series of articles covering interesting eye candy software. We only feature open-source software in this series.

The subject of this article is Buoh. It’s an online comic strips reader that’s published under an open source license. It’s designed to bring a little light relief to your desktop. That sounds like a candidate for the Linux Candy series.

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4 ways I contribute to open source as a Linux systems administrator

Filed under
Linux
OSS

I recently participated in The Linux Foundation Open Source Summit North America, held virtually June 29-July 2, 2020. In the course of that event, I had the opportunity to speak with a fellow attendee about my career in Linux systems administration and how it had led me to a career focused on open source. Specifically, he asked, how does a systems administrator who doesn't do a lot of coding participate in open source projects?

That's a great question!

A lot of focus in open source projects is placed on the actual code, but there's a lot more to it than that. The following are some ways that I've been deeply involved in open source projects, without writing code.

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Self-Hosted and Open-Source Alternatives to Popular Services

Filed under
Server
OSS

The internet is a prominent place. And while it may feel like a few huge names like Netflix, Dropbox, and Facebook run the show, they are far from the only option you have available. It’s now easier than ever to find a self-hosted alternative to just about any online platform.

What does self-hosted mean? Self-hosted platforms are apps that function through their web hosting instead of a major option like Amazon Web Services. Generally, they’re not only open-source (a.k.a. free) but full of different content, features, and other things worth checking out.

And here’s the best part—they’re often cheaper! Here are some of the best self-hosted alternatives to popular services.

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Also: Ideal Linux webhosting services of 2020

OSS Leftovers

Filed under
OSS
Misc

  • The Apache® Software Foundation Announces Annual Report for 2020 Fiscal Year

    The Apache® Software Foundation (ASF), the all-volunteer developers, stewards, and incubators of more than 350 Open Source projects and initiatives, announced today the availability of the annual report for its 2020 fiscal year (1 May 2019 - 30 April 2020).

    Now in its 21st year, the world's largest Open Source foundation’s "Apache Way" of community-driven development is the proven process behind thousands of developers successfully collaborating on hundreds of Apache projects. The Apache Way has directly influenced the InnerSource methodology of applying Open Source and open development principles to an organization. The Apache Way has been adopted by countless organizations, including Capital One, Comcast, Ericsson, HP, IBM, Google, Microsoft, PayPal, SAP, T-Mobile, Walmart, and countless others.

  • Apache Software Foundation Estimates Its Code Value Increased ~$600M For FY2020

    For fiscal year 2019 the Apache Software Foundation valued their codebase at around $20 billion USD. The open-source organization has now published their annual report for fiscal year 2020.

    The Apache Software Foundation's FY2020 report values their massive code-base now in excess of $20 billion dollars using the CoCoMo model. With eight million lines of code added over their fiscal year, they estimate that increase to be approximately worth $600 million USD worth of work.

  • This 'world's biggest' messaging and collaboration rollout is based on open source software

    For example, technology developed by UK software company Element is to be rolled out by the German education system to provide collaboration tools for half a million seats in the states of Schlesweig-Holstein and Hamburg.

    [...]

    "We want to democratize control over communication," Element's CEO Matthew Hodgson tells ZDNet – needless to say, over an open-source video call. "People in Germany shouldn't be beholden to the legislation happening in the US, or trusting their data through an app controlled by a particular government.

    "Empowering organizations to run their own stuff is just a re-levelling effect to decentralize the control of that data to the people who own it in the first place," he continues, "rather than holding it all in whatever organization it might be and hope it doesn't get compromised or pressured by the authorities."

  • New Release: Tor Browser 10.0a4

    Tor Browser 10.0a4 is now available from the Tor Browser Alpha download page and also from our distribution directory.

    Note: This is an alpha release, an experimental version for users who want to help us test new features. For everyone else, we recommend downloading the latest stable release instead.

  • New Release: Tor Browser 9.5.3

    Tor Browser 9.5.3 is now available from the Tor Browser download page and also from our distribution directory.

    This release updates Firefox to 68.11.0esr, NoScript to 11.0.34, and Tor to 0.4.3.6.

GNU nano 5.0 Open-Source Text Editor Released, This is What’s New

Filed under
GNU
OSS

GNU nano is probably one of the most popular text editors for the command line. It’s probably included in almost all GNU/Linux distribution is it usually comes in handy whenever there’s some configuration files you need to edit.

Dubbed “Among the fields of barley,” GNU nano 5.0 introduces a new --indicator parameter that displays some sort of scrollbar to show you where the viewport is located in the buffer and how much it covers, along with the --bookstyle parameter that makes nano consider any line that begins with a whitespace the start of a paragraph.

It’s now possible to tag any line with an anchor using the shortcut. You can then jump to the nearest anchor using and . GNU nano 5.0 also lest you access the Execute Command prompt directly from the main menu with ^T, as well as to toggle the help lines in all menus (except for the linter and help viewer) with M-X and list the possibilities at a filename prompt with .

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More in Tux Machines

libinput 1.16.0

libinput 1.16.0 is now available.

No significant changes since the second RC, so here's slightly polished RC1
announcement text.

This has been a long cycle, mostly because there weren't any huge changes on
the main development branch and a lot of the minor annoyances have found
their way into the 1.15.x releases anyway.

libinput now monitors timestamps of the events vs the current time when
libinput_dispatch() is called by the compositor. Where the difference
*may* result in issues, a (rate-limited) warning is printed to the log.
So you may see messages popping up in the form of
  "event processing lagging behind by XYZms, your system is too slow"
This is a warning only and has no immediate effect. Previously we would only
notice (and warn about) this when it affected an internal timer. Note that
these warnings do not show an issue with libinput, it shows that the the
compositor is not calling libinput_dispatch() quick enough.

The wheel tilt axis source was deprecated. No device ever had the required
udev properties set so we should stop pretending we support this.

Touchpads now support the "flat" acceleration profile. The default remains
unchanged and this needs to be selected in the configuration interface. The
"flat" profile applies a constant factor to movement deltas (1.0 for the
default speed setting).

Events from lid or tablet-mode switches that are known to libinput as being
unreliable are now filtered and no longer passed to the caller.
This prevents callers from receiving those known-bogus events and having to
replicate the same heuristics to identify unreliable devices that libinput
employs internally.

A new "libinput analyze" debugging tool is the entry tool for analysing
various aspects of devices. Right now the only tool is
"libinput analyze per-slot-delta" which can be used to detect pointer jumps
in a libiput record output. This tool used to live elsewhere, it was moved
to libinput so that reporters can easier run this tool, reducing the load on
the maintainers.

The tools have seen a few minor improvements, e.g.
- "libinput record touchpad.yml" does the right thing, no explicit --output
  argument required
- libinput measure touchpad-pressure has been revamped to be a bit more
  obvious
- libinput measure touchpad-size has been added (as replacement for the
  touchpad-edge-detector tool)
- libinput measure fuzz has been fixed to work (again and) slightly more
  reliable

The libinput test suite has been fixed to avoid interference with the
currently running session. Previously it was virtually impossible to work
while the test suite is running - multiple windows would pop up, the screen
would blank regularly, etc.

And of course a collection of fixes, quirks and new bugs.

As usual, see the git shortlog for details.

Diego Abad A (1):
      FIX: typo on building documentation

Peter Hutterer (2):
      test: semi-fix the switch_suspend_with_touchpad test
      libinput 1.16.0

git tag: 1.16.0
Read more Also: >Libinput 1.16 Released - Ready To Warn You If Your System Is Too Slow

18 Frameworks, Libraries, and Projects for Building Medical Applications

Open-source is not just a license or a code-based that left free on an online repository, It's a complete concept which comes with several advantages. Moreover, the most advantage you can get from Open-source is beyond the open-code it's FREEDOM; freedom to use or re-shape it as you see fit within your project commercial or otherwise, and that depends on the license of course. You are free from the headache of license conflict legal problems but also from the dilemma of dealing with restrections and limitations which come with property licenses. You are free from the system lock-in schemes, furthermore, you own your data, and freedom to customize the software as your structure requires and workflow demands. The Community: The Open-source project gains a powerful community as they gain users, the community users vary between advanced users, end-users, developers and end-users on decision-making level. Many of the community users are providing quality inputs from their usage and customized use-case and workflow or test-runs, Furthermore, they always have something to add as new features, UI modification, different usability setup, and overall introducing new workflows and tools, and That's what makes the progress of the open-source different than non-free solutions. While, Good community means good support, The community is a good resource to hire advanced users, developers, and system experts. It also provides alternative options when hiring developers. Unlike non-free software which are not blessed with such communities and where the options there are limited, The rich open-source community provides rich questions and answers sets that contributed by users from all around the world. Higher education value for the in-house team The open-source concept itself provides educational value, I owe most of what I know to open-source communities.The access to the source code and open-channels communication with the core developers is the best educational value any developer can get. Read more

Android Leftovers

Python Programming