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MatchMiner: An Open-source Computational platform for Clinical Trials Genomic Matching

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OSS

The challenge of matching precipitant (patients) for cancer trials is not easy nor simple. The current methods for patient recruitment for clinical trials result in failure [5]. Our topic of the day MatchMiner is designed to help researchers overcome this challenge.

MatchMiner is an open-source computational platform with a specific focus on patient genomic profiles to precision cancer medicine clinical trials. It is intended for researchers with software development skills.

The project is developed by researchers at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute (DFCI) which is known as a comprehensive cancer treatment and research institution in Boston, Massachusetts, United States. It's also an affiliate of Harvard Medical School.

[...]

MatchMiner is released as an open-source project under Apache License 2.0.

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Manage your software repositories with this open source tool

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Foreman is a robust management and automation product that provides administrators of Linux environments with enterprise-level solutions for four key scenarios: provisioning management, configuration management, patch management, and content management. A major component of the content management functionality in Foreman is provided by the Pulp project. While Pulp is an integral part of this product, it is also a standalone, free, and open source project that is making huge progress on its own.

Let's take a look at the Pulp project, especially the features of the latest release, Pulp 3.

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The ROI of open source

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OSS

In the course of our work in the Open Source Program Office, we get to have discussions once in a while with Red Hat partners about the nature of open source and the best practices to start using open source for a project or two within the partner's organization.

These conversations are a little hard to describe. On the one hand, there's the standard list of open source things to do beyond just tossing out a bunch of code onto an open source repository and declaring to the world "we are open!" If you've done this, you've fallen victim to one of the classic open source blunders, never just throw your code over the wall.

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Open Source U-Boot Bootloader Now Supports SquashFS Filesystem

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OSS

SquashFS is one of the most popular compressed read-only filesystems for Linux operating system. It is widely used in embedded systems to compress entire filesystems, inodes, and directories.

In 2009, support for SquashFS merged into the mainline kernel as part of Linux 2.6.9. But so far, open-source Universal Bootloader (U-Boot) did not support SquashFS, leading to an inability to load kernel images or Device Tree Blobs from a SquashFS filesystem in U-Boot.

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12 Open Source/Commercial Software for Data Center Infrastructure Management

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OSS

When a company grows its demand in computing resources grows as well. It works for regular companies as for providers, including those renting out dedicated servers. When the total number of racks exceeds 10 you’ll start facing issues.

How to inventory servers and spares? How to maintain a data center in a good health, locating and fixing potential threats on time. How to find the rack with broken equipment? How to prepare physical machines to work? Carrying out these tasks manually will take too much time otherwise will require having a huge team of administrators in your IT-department.

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10 Open Source/Commercial Control Panels For Virtual Machines (VM’s) Management

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Automatic creation and management of virtual machines is a topical issue for any company that provides VPS services. If you manage a large number of machines, a command line is definitely not the only tool you may need to perform various operations including client tasks, because such operations may be time-consuming.

In order to simplify routine tasks of server administrators and users, various companies develop control panels for virtual machines management, including interface-based solutions.

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6 open source virtualization technologies to know in 2020

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Virtualization Tools, better known as Virt Tools, is a collection of six open source virtualization tools created by various contributors to make the virtualization world a better place.

Some of the tools, like KVM and QEMU, might be familiar to Linux enthusiasts, but tools like libvirt and libguestfs are probably less so.

In case you prefer to learn through watching videos than reading, I created a video version of this article, which you can access on YouTube.

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Why we open sourced our security project

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OSS

When Nathaniel McCallum and I embarked on the project that is now called Enarx, we made one decision right at the beginning: the code for Enarx would be open source, a stance fully supported by our employer, Red Hat (see the standard disclaimer on my blog). All of it, and forever.

That's a decision that we've not regretted at any point, and it's something we stand behind. As soon as we had enough code for a demo and were ready to show it, we created a repository on GitHub and made it public. There's a very small exception, which is that there are some details of upcoming chip features that are shared with us under an NDA1 where publishing any code we might write for them would be a breach of the NDA. But where this applies (which is rarely), we are absolutely clear with the vendors that we intend to make the code open as soon as possible, and we lobby them to release details as early as they can (which may be earlier than they might prefer) so that more experts can look over both their designs and our code.

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The 10 Best Open-Source Photoshop Alternatives

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We all know how much Photoshop is loved by designers all over the globe, thanks to its multitude of features and excellent user interface. With that being said, not everyone would be able to afford its monthly subscription plan that costs a whopping $20.99, which could make individuals who are just getting into this field take a step back and think about other available options.

Luckily, there is quite a few professional design software out there on the Internet, which is open-source, meaning you won’t have to pay a single penny to use them. Moreover, the ones on our list would be able to work on Windows, macOS, and even Linux, on which Photoshop doesn’t run anyway (without a virtual machine or Wine, that is). However, before we begin, we’d like to tell you that no design software will indeed be a replacement for all the features provided by Photoshop. Still, they can do quite well when it comes to individual tasks, such as graphic designing, photo editing, and RAW image processing. If we have that clear, let’s cut to the chase and take a look at the best free and open-source Photoshop alternatives for newbies and professionals alike.

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PeaZip 7.4.0

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Software
OSS

PeaZip is an open source file and archive manager. It's freeware and free of charge for any use. PeaZip can extract most of archive formats both from Windows and Unix worlds, ranging from mainstream 7Z, RAR, TAR and ZIP to experimental ones like PAQ/LPAQ family, currently the most powerful compressor available.

Open and extract 180+ archive formats: 001, 7Z, ACE(*), ARC, ARJ, BZ2, CAB, DMG, GZ, ISO, LHA, PAQ, PEA, RAR, TAR, UDF, WIM, XZ, ZIP ZIPX - view full list of supported archive file formats for archiving and for extraction.

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