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OSS

6 Best Free and Open Source Console Based Network ‘top’ Tools

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OSS

Out of the myriad of utilities that are available for Linux, top is a troubleshooting tool that often comes up in conversation. With good reason, top is a tool that many users frequently turn to. It is is a small open source utility that offers a dynamic real-time view of a running system, allowing users to monitor the processes that are running on a system, and to identify which applications are consuming more resources than they should. While top (and other alternatives) are useful tools to monitor the running processes on a system, functionality does not extend to network activity.

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Free Software and OSS Leftovers

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GNU
OSS
  • GIMP Image Editor 2.10.22 Available to Download [PPA]

    GIMP image editor 2.10.22 available to install in Ubuntu 18.04 and Ubuntu 20.04, though it’s not officially announced at the moment.

  • Community Member Monday: Adolfo Jayme Barrientos

    I live and work in Mexico. I grew up in a home where we didn’t have video games or a computer, but it was filled with books; I developed a liking for reading, typography, typesetting and book design.

    I was mesmerised when I got my first computer: reading also gave me an edge for learning languages, and when it came to choosing a university major, I went straight to linguistics. I work as an EFL (English as a Foreign Language) teacher with 12 to 15-year-old pupils.

    I started translating software eleven years ago, and started doing it professionally some five years ago, to finance my university tuition. I am now trilingual, and continue reading books in various Romance languages whenever I have free time.

  • Mozilla Addons Blog: New add-on badges

    A few weeks ago, we announced the pilot of a new Promoted Add-ons program. This new program aims to expand the number of add-ons we can review and verify as compliant with our add-on policies in exchange for a fee from participating developers.

    We have recently finished selecting the participants for the pilot, which will run until the end of November 2020. When these extensions successfully complete the review process, they will receive a new badge on their listing page on addons.mozilla.org (AMO) and in the Firefox Add-ons Manager (about:addons).

  • PeaZip 7.4.2

    PeaZip is an open source file and archive manager. It's freeware and free of charge for any use. PeaZip can extract most of archive formats both from Windows and Unix worlds, ranging from mainstream 7Z, RAR, TAR and ZIP to experimental ones like PAQ/LPAQ family, currently the most powerful compressor available.

  • Nextcloud Hub 20 Now Available

    Nextcloud has announced the immediate availability of Nextcloud Hub 20 at the Nextcloud Conference in Berlin.

    The new release introduces users to a dashboard with an overview of the day, integrating information from across Nextcloud as well as third party social media, productivity and collaboration platforms.

  • Nextcloud 20: One private cloud to rule them all

    I've long recommended Nextcloud as a wonderful open-source, private Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS) cloud. I run it myself both on a server in my office and on my TMDHosting remote server. Over time, though, Nextcloud has been adding more features. These include built-in video-conferencing and group meeting services. Nextcloud Talk and Software-as-a-Service (SaaS) version of the LibreOffice office suite, Collabora. Now, with Nextcloud 20, other third-party services such as Microsoft Teams, Slack, Jira, GitHub, Twitter, and dozens of others are being integrated.

    [...]

    It adds on to its existing strengths by using an open application programming interface (API), the Open Collaboration Services (OCS). This is a long, established API. Started as part of KDE's open desktop standardization effort in 2009, OCS now handles basic file functionality like file access, sharing, versioning, and commenting. It also covers communications, calendaring, and task management.

    Nextcloud is using it to bridge the gap between its own Talk chat service with other communications services, besides the ones mentioned earlier, such as Matrix, IRC, XMPP, and many others. More IM services, such as HipChat and Telegram, are in the works.

  • PlayerCTL: The Best MPRIS Media Player Control Out There!
  • Librsvg is accepting interns for Outreachy's December 2020 round

    Outreachy's December 2020 / March 2021 round is available only for students in the Southern hemisphere. People in the Northern hemisphere can wait until the 2021 mid-year round.

7 Best Free and Open Source Linux Disk Encryption Tools

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Linux
OSS

The importance of security should never be underestimated. The consequences of losing data can be disastrous for any organization. For example, the loss of a single unencrypted laptop may have huge repercussions. This could include breaching data protection legislation with the risk of a significant fine, a loss in the confidence of an organization, as well as the risk that sensitive data may fall into the hands of a competitor or third party with malicious intent.

Of course, whenever information is accessible, there is the risk of its loss. A misdirected fax or a misdelivered letter can lead to sensitive information being disclosed in error. But the severity and ramifications of that risk is exacerbated when the data is stored on a computer. Modern computer hard disks have the capacity to store a gargantuan amount of data. A single hard disk may hold personal details of hundreds of thousands or even millions of individuals. In the event that the data is not encrypted, the loss of the hard disk may represent an organization’s worst nightmare. The actual cost of replacing the hard disk of the machine pales into insignificance compared to the loss of the confidential information and customer security.

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KeenWrite: An Open Source Text Editor for Data Scientists and Mathematicians

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OSS

There are several open-source Markdown editors available for Linux but KeenWrite is a bit interesting with the string interpolation and R markdown support.

Not just limited to that, it also supports real-time preview and a bunch of other features particularly helpful for academics in mathematics, statistics and other related fields.

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Now and Then: The Fate of 5 Open Source Integrated Development Environments

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OSS

It’s fun to experiment with new software that isn’t anywhere near the polished article. But there’s associated risks, even with open source software. You’ll invest time and effort in learning in the program’s foibles. That software might never see a stable release, it might be a big time sink even getting it up-and-running on your system. The upside is that promising software might turn overnight into a huge success, or it might be a slow burn success. And while there’s a huge array of open source successes, there’s been awful open source failures along the way. It can be a bumpy ride!

Back in early 2014, we carried a feature looking at 5 Integrated Development Environments that were a tempting prospect. The five IDEs are Brackets, Light Table, Julia Studio, Dart Editor, and Aptana Studio.

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8 Productive Free and Open Source Clipboard Managers

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OSS

Technology tools do have their limits. No one will become a master chef simply because they use chef-endorsed saucepans, the finest ingredients, or have access to sought-after recipes. For example, a diary application can make it easier for individuals to keep track of their daily activities and thoughts, but will the application really bring order into a chaotic world? Time tracker apps help users keep track of how much time is spent on various activities during the day, but still the user has to remember to start them.

Don’t get us wrong. There’s a real burning passion inside us for small productivity tools. Lean tools that focus on a single productivity enhancing activity can make an enormous difference to the way time is spent. Bloated, complex productivity tools tend to only slow you down, and complex solutions require too much maintenance.

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University champions open source with new OSPO

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OSS

Rochester Institute of Technology is establishing Open@RIT, an initiative dedicated to supporting all kinds of "open work," including—but not limited to—open source software, open data, open hardware, open educational resources, Creative Commons-licensed work, and open research.

The new open source programs office aims to determine and grow the footprint of RIT's impact on all things "open," leading to more collaboration, creation, and contribution, on and off campus.

Open work is non-proprietary—meaning it's licensed to be publicly accessible and anyone can modify or share, within the terms of the license. While the term "open source" originally came out of the software industry, it has since become a set of values that has applications in everything from science to media.

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Open source tools provide an economic advantage for science

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OSS

Free and open source software (FOSS) and the distributed digital manufacturing of free and open source hardware (FOSH) have shown great promise for developing custom scientific tools. For some time now, FOSH has provided scientists a high return on investment. In fact, my previous research in the Open Source Lab reported substantial economic savings from using these technologies. However, the open source design paradigm has since grown by orders of magnitude; now, there are examples of open source technology for science in the vast majority of disciplines, and several resources, including the Journal of Open Hardware, are dedicated to publishing them.

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9 Best Free and Open Source Linux Markdown Editors

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Linux
OSS

Markdown is a plain text formatting syntax created by John Gruber in 2004. It’s designed to be easy-to-read and easy-to-write.

Readability is at the very heart of Markdown. It offers the advantages of plain text, provides a convenient format for writing for the web, but it’s not intended to be a replacement for HTML. Markdown is a writing format, not a publishing format. You control the display of the document; formatting words as bold or italic, adding images, and creating lists are just a few of the things we can do with Markdown. Mostly, Markdown is just regular text with a few non-alphabetic characters included, such as # or *.

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Free Software and FOSS

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GNU
OSS
  • Michael Meeks: 2020-10-01 Thursday

    In talking to a number of friends, one mentioned that the idea of 'gratis everything' is an increasing problem in many FOSS projects. It's interesting, many years back the fashion was to talk about Open Standards (which are of course great) instead of Open Source (which is better). Noawadays that's less popular and I hear people emphasising the vital Freedom from Price (or even reminders to contribute) in place of Software Freedom. Possibly both of these betray an emphasis on users's rights rather than the responsibility to contribute.

  • LibrePlanet 2021 CFS office hours

    The LibrePlanet call for sessions is open now and will be open until November 20 and we want to hear from you!

    Speaking at a conference, and even submitting a proposal, can be intimidating or hard. Luckily, some great, experienced speakers are volunteering their time to help out during the CFS office hours.

    Whether you want to propose a talk and want feedback on your idea, proposal wording, talk title, or just advice on how to deal with nerves, there is one more office hour slot scheduled over the next few weeks.

  • Christopher Allan Webber: Spritely website launches, plus APConf video(s)!

    Not bad, eh? Also with plenty of cute characters on the Spritely site (thank you to David Revoy for taking my loose character sketches and making them into such beautiful paintings!)

    But those cute characters are there for a reason! Spritely is quite ambitious and has quite a few subprojects. Here's a video that explains how they all fit together. Hopefully that makes things more clear!

    Actually that video is from ActivityPub Conference 2020, the talks of which have now all have their videos live! I also moderated the intro keynote panel about ActivityPub authors/editors. Plus there's an easter egg, the ActivityPub Conference Opening Song! Smile

  • Should you be concerned about the Windows XP leak?

    When a game was out of date, and he had developed a whole new gaming engine, he would remove licensed third-party code and toss the source out for all to play with under a GPL license, and see what they came up with. All kinds of mods would be made, but more important, it gave coders a chance to show off their chops.

  • Free Tools for FOSS Governance

    Governance plays a crucial role in our world by determining and defining acceptable ways of interacting and doing business with one other. When governance is done well, it provides a supportive framework that facilitates interaction and fades into the background. When it’s done poorly, things don’t run as smoothly. The same is true within open source projects, where governance is key to providing overall operating guidelines, defining rules of conduct, and stating specific goals.

  • Sintel 10th Anniversary

    Early this morning I read a post from Colin Levy on Twitter informing the open movie Sintel had its 10th anniversary today. Ten years... This project really influenced so many components of my life (especially about the software and licenses I use now). I also met a lot of great people on it and my artworks started to get a lot of visibility at that time. So, I took my stylus, opened Krita 4.4beta2 and started a quick painting to meditate about it. I hope you'll like it! Thank you again Sintel team and happy anniversary!

  • How open source underpins blockchain technology

    One of the more popular operating systems, Linux, is open source. Linux powers the servers for many of the services we feel comfortable sharing personal information on every day.

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More in Tux Machines

Mozilla: Rust, MDN and More

  • This Week In Rust: This Week in Rust 361
  • MDN Web Docs: Editorial strategy and community participation - Mozilla Hacks - the Web developer blog

    Our updated editorial strategy has two main parts: the creation of content pillars and an editorial calendar. The MDN writers’ team has always been responsible for keeping the MDN web platform reference documentation up-to-date, including key areas such as HTML, CSS, JavaScript, and Web APIs. We are breaking these key areas up into “content pillars”, which we will work on in turn to make sure that the significant new web platform updates are documented each month.

  • L10n Report: October 2020 Edition | Mozilla L10N

    New content and projects What’s new or coming up in Firefox desktop

  • Modern Web Standards Are Leaving Niche Web Browsers Behind - LinuxReviews

    There's plenty of web browsers to choose from on desktop computers but there's not much of a choice if you look beneath the surface. There's a ton of web browsers based on Google's Chromium code-base, a few mostly iOS and macOS browsers based on Apple's Webkit engine and then there's Firefox with it's own Quantum rendering engine. There also Pale Moon with it's own Goanna rendering engine. It is increasingly falling behind the bigger browsers and more and more websites are broken in it as web developers deploy web standards other browsers, but not Pale Moon, support. [...] The developer of the Pale Moon web browser announced that Pale Moon's source code is being migrated off Microsoft GitHub yesterday. The reason? Moonchild doesn't like that GitHub is increasingly relying on web standards the Pale Moon web browser doesn't support.

  • US Department Of Justice Lawsuit Against Google Could Kill Firefox - LinuxReviews

    A US Department of Justice lawsuit against Google on the grounds that they are a "monopolist" could result in the death of the one realistic free software web browser alternative that's not based on the Google-controlled Chromium code-base and it's Blink rendering engine. Mozilla will need to find some other partner willing to pay them $400 million a year if they are forced to cancel their sweet "royalty" contract with Google.

Kernel: Linux 5.10, Linux 5.9 and Hardware Support

      
  • Linux 5.10 ARM64 Has A "8~20x" Performance Optimization Forgotten About For Two Years - Phoronix

    Last week was the main set of ARM 64-bit architecture updates for Linux 5.10 while today a second batch of changes were sent in for this kernel. That first round had the Memory Tagging Extension (MTE) and Pointer Authentication support among other improvements while this secondary pull has two notable performance optimizations.  First up is a performance optimization that the Arm developers acknowledge was seemingly forgotten about for some two years. Back in 2018 was a memory management speed-up by around 20x for the mremap system call on large memory regions. That work was merged but the feature never enabled for the ARM64 Linux kernel builds until now. 

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  • Kernel 5.9: Onwards and upwards

    With version 5.9 of the Linux Kernel now released, it is time to, once again, review Collabora's contributions to this release which contains many improvements, primarily in hardware support, multimedia, graphics, testing and continuous contributions to other subsystems. The importance of software maintenance has been highlighted in the last week with the discovery of a high-severity Bluetooth flaw. Whilst some reports have suggested that 5.9 contains the required fixes, many articles have been updated to reflect the fact that this is not the case. The required changes should be available as part of the 5.10 kernel when it is released and the kernel stable branches have picked them up. Many distributions are also now providing security releases covering this issue, we advise that you look out for (and apply) security fixes from your distribution of choice.

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  • It’s in the Air: The Corsair HS70 Wireless Headset & Linux

    Looking more widely at headset support in Linux, what can we expect? Unfortunately there’s a dearth of information, especially once you get away from the most popular models. Analog headsets will of course be fine (the joys of analog!), and Bluetooth should also work well, as long as you have that working. Though note that some Bluetooth audio devices prefer mobile, like some Jabra wireless earbuds that have spotty records of connecting to computers in general. Otherwise, though, there lacks any central database or way to find out what the support is like for a device you are interested in. You’ll have to rely on your search skills, maybe GitHub, and probably sorting out random forum or Reddit posts to figure out any issues. The Arch Wiki tends to be a great hardware reference, but here there’s just a page for Bluetooth headsets. These days it seems quite likely that your random USB audio device, even wireless, has a decent chance of working. But maybe not, and if you rely on any features that may require software or special drivers (controlling the device beyond volume, sound virtualization, etc.) it is still is a bit of a guessing game. At least HeadsetControl provides an indirect way of knowing if something will work, as they list many models of headsets which I assume means all the standard audio works already. When in doubt, make sure you check that return policy!

Security: Patches, FUD, and Incidents

  • Making the Grade with Linux and Cybersecurity at the Intelligent Edge

    As intelligent edge deployments accelerate, we have reached a crossroads where many are being forced to choose between the accessibility, ease of use, flexibility, and leading-edge capabilities of open source software and the safety and security of systems in the field. How we proceed has the potential to lead massive transformation in the embedded industry. “Using open source early in the proof-of-concept cycle means taking advantage of the rapid pace of open source innovation,” says Matt Jones, Chief Architect at Wind River. “Taking your solution to market comes with additional measures meant to protect your device throughout its lifecycle.”

  • Security updates for Thursday [LWN.net]

    Security updates have been issued by Arch Linux (freetype2), Debian (bluez, firefox-esr, and freetype), Fedora (firefox), openSUSE (chromium), Oracle (kernel), Red Hat (java-11-openjdk), Slackware (kernel), SUSE (freetype2, gnutls, kernel, php7, and tomcat), and Ubuntu (flightgear, italc, libapache2-mod-auth-mellon, libetpan, and php-imagick).

  • Snyk to automatically check Docker Official Images for security problems [Ed: ZDNet pushing FUD vendors again, ones connected to Microsoft]
  • OpenDev’s Gerrit deployment back online after suspected admin account compromise

    OpenDev.org’s Gerrit deployment has been restored after being taken offline following the detection of malicious activity on its repositories. The repositories were disabled two hours after project maintainers were alerted to a suspected security breach on Tuesday morning (October 20). “We believe an admin account in Gerrit was compromised allowing an attacker to escalate privileges within Gerrit,” said Clark Boylan in a service announcement issued later that day. “Around 02:00 UTC October 20 suspicious review activity was noticed, and we were made aware of it shortly afterwards. “The involved account was disabled and removed from privileged Gerrit groups. After further investigation we decided that we needed to stop the service, this happened at about 04:00 UTC.”

Turing Pi 2 clusters four Raspberry Pi CM4 modules

Turing Machines unveiled a “Turin Pi 2” Mini-ITX board that clusters 4x Raspberry Pi CM4 modules with a Layer-2 managed switch along with 2x GbE, 4x USB, 2x mini-PCIe, and 2x SATA 3.0. Turing Machines Inc., which earlier this month announced a final 1K run of its Turing Pi cluster board, announced a second-gen Turing Pi 2. Due to ship in 2021, the board offers 4x nodes to cluster Raspberry Pi Compute Modules, compared to 7x for the original Turing Pi. The Gen2 design supports the new Raspberry Pi Compute Module 4 and is equipped with additional interfaces, including 2x mini-PCIe and 2x SATA 3.0. Read more