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OSS

Top 5 open source alternatives to Google Analytics

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If you have a website or run an online business, collecting data on where your visitors or customers come from, where they land on your site, and where they leave is vital. Why? That information can help you better target your products and services, and beef up the pages that are turning people away.

To gather that kind of information, you need a web analytics tool.

Many businesses of all sizes use Google Analytics. But if you want to keep control of your data, you need a tool that you can control. You won’t get that from Google Analytics. Luckily, Google Analytics isn’t the only game on the web.

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openIMIS: Open-source Health Financing Package

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openIMIS is an open-source healthcare finance package that is developed and maintained by active community of developers and packed by several world leading class organization.

The main goal of it is to provide an efficient healthcare finance system as an alternative for the commercial solutions which usually come with a high cost.

openIMIS journey started back in 2012, since then, it has been evolving ever since and proven resource and cost-effective in low resources environment and countries. It currently runs in many healthcare facilities in Tanzania, Chad, Nepal, DRC and Cameroon.

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12 factors to measuring an open source project's health

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In the Open Source Program Office we consider a healthy open source community one that demonstrates open practices, uses open infrastructure, and cultivates an open culture with the goal of becoming more sustainable. But even for the most seasoned community architects, measuring an open source community’s health is a complex, difficult, and sometimes intimidating task.

That’s because any picture of project health is actually a mosaic. Multiple factors combine to depict a community’s overall health. You’ll never find just one indicator you can point to and say "See? The community is healthy." (You can, however, find some indicators that immediately show that a community is unhealthy.)

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5 Best Free and Open Source OS-level Virtualization

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A container is an operating-system-level virtualization method for running multiple isolated Linux systems on a control host using a single Linux kernel.

There’s an important distinction between OS-level virtualization and virtualization. The former is often known as containers.

OS-level virtualization (containers) share the same operating system kernel and isolate the application processes from the rest of the system. For example: ARM Linux systems run ARM Linux containers, x86 Linux systems run x86 Linux containers, x86 Windows systems run x86 Windows containers. Linux containers are extremely portable, but they must be compatible with the underlying system.

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Protect your network with open source tools

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System integrity is essential, especially when you're charged with safeguarding other people's personal details on your network. It's critical that system administrators are familiar with security tools, whether their purview is a home, a small business, or an organization with hundreds or thousands of employees.

Cybersecurity involves securing networks against unauthorized access. However, there are many attack vectors out there that most people don't consider. The cliché of a lone hacker manually dueling with firewall rules until they gain access to a network is popular—but wildly inaccurate. Security breaches happen through automation, malware, phishing, ransomware, and more. You can't directly fight every attack as it happens, and you can't count on every computer user to exercise common sense. Therefore, you have to design a system that resists intrusion and protects users against outside attacks as much as it protects them from their own mistakes.

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MariaDB 10.5.6 Release Notes

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Server
OSS

MariaDB 10.5 is the current stable series of MariaDB. It is an evolution of MariaDB 10.4 with several entirely new features not found anywhere else and with backported and reimplemented features from MySQL.

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Free Software/FOSS Leftovers

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OSS
  • The managed open source survey

    In June of 2020, Tidelift fielded our annual managed open source survey of technologists.

    Over 600 people shared how they use open source software today, what holds them back, and what tools and strategies would help them use it even more effectively.

  • Organizations Turn To Open Source In Tough Economic Times: Survey

    Organizations are turning to open source during the COVID-19 recession to do more with less. According to the third annual Managed Open Source Survey released by Tidelift, 42% of organizations report their application development budgets were cut while 44% state they are likely to use more open source.

    More than two-thirds of organizations say saving time and money is the top reason to use more open source for application development during the downturn (68%), while increasing efficiency of application development and maintenance was cited by almost half of respondents (48%).

  • Announcing Our Sustainability Coordinator Role [Ed: Deb Nicholson's first post for OSI (of which she become GM in the mean time i.e. the only paid staff member)]

    The Open Source Initiative is in the middle of growth year which means we're building capacity and hiring staff. We're looking for someone to help us with capacity building, who has experience in both fundraising and relationship management. If you are interested in working with us or you know someone who is, please get in touch!

  • Start using virtual tables in Apache Cassandra 4.0

    Among the many additions in the recent Apache Cassandra 4.0 beta release, virtual tables is one that deserves some attention.

    In previous versions of Cassandra, users needed access to Java Management Extensions (JMX) to examine Cassandra details such as running compactions, clients, metrics, and a variety of configuration settings. Virtual tables removes these challenges. Cassandra 4.0 beta enables users to query those details and data as Cassandra Query Language (CQL) rows from a read-only system table.

    Here is how the JMX-based mechanism in previous Cassandra versions worked. Imagine a user wants to check on the compaction status of a particular node in a cluster. The user first has to establish a JMX connection to run nodetool compactionstats on the node. This requirement immediately presents the user with a few complications. Is the user's client configured for JMX access? Are the Cassandra nodes and firewall configured to allow JMX access? Are the proper measures for security and auditing prepared and in place? These are only some of the concerns users had to contend with when dealing with in previous versions of Cassandra.

  • LibreOffice QA/Dev Report: September 2020
  • Get cool merchandise for upcoming openSUSE + LibreOffice Conference

    The joint openSUSE + LibreOffice Conference 2020 will take place from October 15 – 17. And there’s lots going on! We’ll have talks, presentations, keynotes, tutorials and much more – see the full schedule for all the details.

9 Best Free and Open Source Network Inventory Management

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Network Inventory Management collates all network infrastructure data and keeps it up to date, helping to streamline processes that improve operational performance. Network inventory management solutions offer reporting functions, and process modeling to automate work-intensive, back-office processes. With this software the system or network administrator will know what is on their network, how it is configured, and when it changes.

This type of software puts to pasture the antiquated way of tracking network inventory, dispensing with the horrid spreadsheet or word processing document.

Network inventory management software reduces time and costs by helping administrators locate information for every day operational issues. With an up-to-date network inventory there is the basis for optimizing devices to fully exhaust their potential and cost-effectively meet your needs. Another benefit offered by using this type of software is that service provisioning is both faster and more accurate. With increased efficiency comes a more accurate overview of the network.

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Design and document APIs using an open source cross-platform tool

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In the world of software-as-a-service (SaaS) and service-based architectures, it's not uncommon for companies to maintain dozens or even hundreds of APIs, often spanning multiple teams, programming languages, and environments. This variability makes it extremely difficult to see what's happening at a high level to prevent changes from having negative impacts.

It's estimated that 40% of large enterprises struggle with challenges to secure, scale, or ensure performance for APIs. Because of this, more and more companies are choosing to adopt a "spec-first development" approach by defining and documenting APIs in an external format like OpenAPI. Storing these documents together in a central location makes it much easier to design, discuss, and approve changes before implementation.

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8 ways to not do open source

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OSS

A while ago, I published my wildly popular1 article How not to make a cup of tea. Casting around for something to write here, it occurred to me that I might write about something that I believe is almost as important as world peace, the forward march of progress, and brotherly/sisterly love: open source projects. There are so many guides out there around how to create an open source project that it's become almost too easy to start a new, successful, community-supported one. I think it's time to redress the balance and give you some clues about how not to do it.

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More in Tux Machines

Mozilla: Rust, MDN and More

  • This Week In Rust: This Week in Rust 361
  • MDN Web Docs: Editorial strategy and community participation - Mozilla Hacks - the Web developer blog

    Our updated editorial strategy has two main parts: the creation of content pillars and an editorial calendar. The MDN writers’ team has always been responsible for keeping the MDN web platform reference documentation up-to-date, including key areas such as HTML, CSS, JavaScript, and Web APIs. We are breaking these key areas up into “content pillars”, which we will work on in turn to make sure that the significant new web platform updates are documented each month.

  • L10n Report: October 2020 Edition | Mozilla L10N

    New content and projects What’s new or coming up in Firefox desktop

  • Modern Web Standards Are Leaving Niche Web Browsers Behind - LinuxReviews

    There's plenty of web browsers to choose from on desktop computers but there's not much of a choice if you look beneath the surface. There's a ton of web browsers based on Google's Chromium code-base, a few mostly iOS and macOS browsers based on Apple's Webkit engine and then there's Firefox with it's own Quantum rendering engine. There also Pale Moon with it's own Goanna rendering engine. It is increasingly falling behind the bigger browsers and more and more websites are broken in it as web developers deploy web standards other browsers, but not Pale Moon, support. [...] The developer of the Pale Moon web browser announced that Pale Moon's source code is being migrated off Microsoft GitHub yesterday. The reason? Moonchild doesn't like that GitHub is increasingly relying on web standards the Pale Moon web browser doesn't support.

  • US Department Of Justice Lawsuit Against Google Could Kill Firefox - LinuxReviews

    A US Department of Justice lawsuit against Google on the grounds that they are a "monopolist" could result in the death of the one realistic free software web browser alternative that's not based on the Google-controlled Chromium code-base and it's Blink rendering engine. Mozilla will need to find some other partner willing to pay them $400 million a year if they are forced to cancel their sweet "royalty" contract with Google.

Kernel: Linux 5.10, Linux 5.9 and Hardware Support

      
  • Linux 5.10 ARM64 Has A "8~20x" Performance Optimization Forgotten About For Two Years - Phoronix

    Last week was the main set of ARM 64-bit architecture updates for Linux 5.10 while today a second batch of changes were sent in for this kernel. That first round had the Memory Tagging Extension (MTE) and Pointer Authentication support among other improvements while this secondary pull has two notable performance optimizations.  First up is a performance optimization that the Arm developers acknowledge was seemingly forgotten about for some two years. Back in 2018 was a memory management speed-up by around 20x for the mremap system call on large memory regions. That work was merged but the feature never enabled for the ARM64 Linux kernel builds until now. 

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  • Kernel 5.9: Onwards and upwards

    With version 5.9 of the Linux Kernel now released, it is time to, once again, review Collabora's contributions to this release which contains many improvements, primarily in hardware support, multimedia, graphics, testing and continuous contributions to other subsystems. The importance of software maintenance has been highlighted in the last week with the discovery of a high-severity Bluetooth flaw. Whilst some reports have suggested that 5.9 contains the required fixes, many articles have been updated to reflect the fact that this is not the case. The required changes should be available as part of the 5.10 kernel when it is released and the kernel stable branches have picked them up. Many distributions are also now providing security releases covering this issue, we advise that you look out for (and apply) security fixes from your distribution of choice.

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  • It’s in the Air: The Corsair HS70 Wireless Headset & Linux

    Looking more widely at headset support in Linux, what can we expect? Unfortunately there’s a dearth of information, especially once you get away from the most popular models. Analog headsets will of course be fine (the joys of analog!), and Bluetooth should also work well, as long as you have that working. Though note that some Bluetooth audio devices prefer mobile, like some Jabra wireless earbuds that have spotty records of connecting to computers in general. Otherwise, though, there lacks any central database or way to find out what the support is like for a device you are interested in. You’ll have to rely on your search skills, maybe GitHub, and probably sorting out random forum or Reddit posts to figure out any issues. The Arch Wiki tends to be a great hardware reference, but here there’s just a page for Bluetooth headsets. These days it seems quite likely that your random USB audio device, even wireless, has a decent chance of working. But maybe not, and if you rely on any features that may require software or special drivers (controlling the device beyond volume, sound virtualization, etc.) it is still is a bit of a guessing game. At least HeadsetControl provides an indirect way of knowing if something will work, as they list many models of headsets which I assume means all the standard audio works already. When in doubt, make sure you check that return policy!

Security: Patches, FUD, and Incidents

  • Making the Grade with Linux and Cybersecurity at the Intelligent Edge

    As intelligent edge deployments accelerate, we have reached a crossroads where many are being forced to choose between the accessibility, ease of use, flexibility, and leading-edge capabilities of open source software and the safety and security of systems in the field. How we proceed has the potential to lead massive transformation in the embedded industry. “Using open source early in the proof-of-concept cycle means taking advantage of the rapid pace of open source innovation,” says Matt Jones, Chief Architect at Wind River. “Taking your solution to market comes with additional measures meant to protect your device throughout its lifecycle.”

  • Security updates for Thursday [LWN.net]

    Security updates have been issued by Arch Linux (freetype2), Debian (bluez, firefox-esr, and freetype), Fedora (firefox), openSUSE (chromium), Oracle (kernel), Red Hat (java-11-openjdk), Slackware (kernel), SUSE (freetype2, gnutls, kernel, php7, and tomcat), and Ubuntu (flightgear, italc, libapache2-mod-auth-mellon, libetpan, and php-imagick).

  • Snyk to automatically check Docker Official Images for security problems [Ed: ZDNet pushing FUD vendors again, ones connected to Microsoft]
  • OpenDev’s Gerrit deployment back online after suspected admin account compromise

    OpenDev.org’s Gerrit deployment has been restored after being taken offline following the detection of malicious activity on its repositories. The repositories were disabled two hours after project maintainers were alerted to a suspected security breach on Tuesday morning (October 20). “We believe an admin account in Gerrit was compromised allowing an attacker to escalate privileges within Gerrit,” said Clark Boylan in a service announcement issued later that day. “Around 02:00 UTC October 20 suspicious review activity was noticed, and we were made aware of it shortly afterwards. “The involved account was disabled and removed from privileged Gerrit groups. After further investigation we decided that we needed to stop the service, this happened at about 04:00 UTC.”

Turing Pi 2 clusters four Raspberry Pi CM4 modules

Turing Machines unveiled a “Turin Pi 2” Mini-ITX board that clusters 4x Raspberry Pi CM4 modules with a Layer-2 managed switch along with 2x GbE, 4x USB, 2x mini-PCIe, and 2x SATA 3.0. Turing Machines Inc., which earlier this month announced a final 1K run of its Turing Pi cluster board, announced a second-gen Turing Pi 2. Due to ship in 2021, the board offers 4x nodes to cluster Raspberry Pi Compute Modules, compared to 7x for the original Turing Pi. The Gen2 design supports the new Raspberry Pi Compute Module 4 and is equipped with additional interfaces, including 2x mini-PCIe and 2x SATA 3.0. Read more