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OSS

Leftovers: OSS

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OSS
  • Communities of Communities: The Next Era of Open Source Software

    We are now about 20 years into the open source software era. You might think that open source simply means publishing the source code for something useful. While this is correct by definition, the most important component of any open source project is its community and how it works together.

    Open source projects are not isolated islands. In fact, it’s common for them to depend on each other. As new projects are created, it is also common that members come from related projects to work on something new. Apache Arrow is an example of a new project that worked across many related projects, creating a new community that from the beginning knew it needed to build a community of communities.

  • 9 Open Source Storage Solutions: A Perfect Solution To Store Your Precious Data

    Whatever business nature you have, there must be some precious data which you want to store in a secured place. Finding a right storage solution is always critical for business, especially for small and medium, but what if you get a perfect solution at no cost.

    There is no doubt that business cant runs without data, but while looking for a solution, you might need to spend a fortune to cover all your storage requirements. Open source tools come as the viable solution where you won’t spend money yet get a suitable solution to store your precious data. And don’t worry we will help you to find one of the best.

  • 15 Open Source Solutions To Setup Your Ecommerce Business

    In the past few years, there is a rapid growth in the online sales. According to a survey, more than 40% people are now shifted to online stores and majorly buying products from their smartphones and tablets.

    With the expeditious rise in the online marketplace, more business introducing online stores. For the big fishes in the industry, the expenses of setting up an online store is like spending peanuts, but for the small or startups, it appears to be a fortune.

    The smart move could be open source platforms, to begin with as they are not only free also reliable and scalable. One can set up the online store not only quickly as well as, in future if you want to add some of the functionalities, which are available with only premium, can be done by paying quite a small amount.

  • An Industry First: Teradata Debuts Open Source Kylo to Quickly Build, Manage Data Pipelines
  • MUA++ (or on to thunderbird)
  • OpenSSL Re-Licensing to Apache License v. 2.0

    The OpenSSL project, home of the world’s most popular SSL/TLS and cryptographic toolkit, is changing its license to the Apache License v2.0 (ASL v2). As part of this effort, the OpenSSL team launched a new website and has been working with various corporate collaborators to facilitate the re-licensing process.

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

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OSS
  • CoreOS Tectonic Now Installs Kubernetes on OpenStack

    CoreOS and OpenStack have a somewhat intertwined history, which is why it's somewhat surprising it took until today for CoreOS's Tectonic Kubernetes distribution to provide an installer that targets OpenStack cloud deployments.

  • Docker and Core OS plan to donate their container technologies to CNCF

    Containers have become a critical component of modern cloud, and Docker Inc. controls the heart of containers, the container runtime.

    There has been a growing demand that this critical piece of technology should be under control of a neutral, third party so that the community can invest in it freely.

  • How Blockchain Is Helping China Go Greener

    Blockchain has near-universal applicability as a distributed transaction platform for securely authenticating exchanges of data, goods, and services. IBM and the Beijing-based Energy-Blockchain Labs are even using it to help reduce carbon emissions in air-polluted China.

  • An efficient approach to continuous documentation
  • The peril in counting source lines on an OSS project

    There seems to be a phase that OSS projects go through where as they mature and gain traction. As they do it becomes increasingly important for vendors to point to their contributions to credibly say they are the ‘xyz’ company. Heptio is one such vendor operating in the OSS space, and this isn’t lost on us. Smile

    It helps during a sales cycle to be able to say “we are the a big contributor to this project, look at the percentage of code and PRs we submitted”. While transparency is important as is recognizing the contributions that key vendors, focus on a single metric in isolation (and LoC in particular) creates a perverse incentive structure. Taken to its extreme it becomes detrimental to project health.

  • An Open Source Unicycle Motor

    And something to ponder. The company that sells this electric unicycle could choose to use a motor with open firmware or one with closed firmware. To many consumers, that difference might not be so significant. To this consumer, though, that’s a vital difference. To me, I fully own the product I bought when the firmware is open. I explain to others that they ought to choose that level of full ownership whenever they get a chance. And if they join a local makerspace, they will likely meet others with similar values. If you don’t yet have a makerspace in your community, inquire around to see if anyone is in the process of forming one. Then find ways to offer them support. That’s how we do things in the FOSS community.

  • The A/V guy’s take on PyCon Pune

    “This is crazy!”, that was my reaction at some point in PyCon Pune. This is one of my first conference where I participated in a lot of things starting from the website to audio/video and of course being the speaker. I saw a lot of aspects of how a conference works and where what can go wrong. I met some amazing people, people who impacted my life , people who I will never forget. I received so much of love and affection that I can never express in words. So before writing anything else I want to thank each and everyone of you , “Thank you!”.

  • Azure Service Fabric takes first tentative steps toward open source [Ed: Microsoft Peter is openwashing a patent trap with back doors]
  • Simulate the Internet with Flashback, a New WebDev Test Tool from LinkedIn
  • Mashape Raises $18M for API Gateway Tech

    Casado sees Mashape's Kong API gateway in particular as being a particularly well positioned technology. Kong is an open-source API gateway and microservice management technology.

  • PrismTech to Demonstrate Open Source FACE 2.1 Transport Services Segment (TSS) Reference Implementation at Air Force FACE Technical Interchange Meeting

    PrismTech’s TSS reference implementation is being made available under GNU Lesser General Public License (LGPL) v3 open source license terms.

  • How Open-Source Robotics Hardware Is Accelerating Research and Innovation

    The latest issue of the IEEE Robotics & Automation Magazine features a special report on open-source robotics hardware and its impact in the field.

SAS, Canonical turn silly over open source

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OSS

Zemlin's job, in other words, isn't to convince companies to adopt open source, but rather to provide a home for the nurturing of open source projects, so they're worthy of adoption. Similarly, Canonical can focus on contributing code rather than spooking enterprises into adopting more.

And SAS? Well, it should probably start with 40 percent open source adoption and grow from there.

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Leftovers: OSS

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OSS
  • Hyperledger Bond Trading Platform Goes Open Source

    A bond trading platform built on top of Hyperledger's Sawtooth Lake distributed ledger was made open source this week, alongside a release of a demo of the technology.

    The project, first announced in September 2016, was designed to demonstrate how bond trading and settlement can be streamlined using distributed ledgers. Created in partnership with the R3 consortium and eight participating banks, the working proof-of-concept has now also been displayed as a public demo on Sawtooth's website.

  • Coreboot Picks Up A New Kabylake Chromebook "Fizz"

    It may not be as exciting as hearing Dell looking at Coreboot, but another Intel-powered Chromebook is now supported by mainline Coreboot.

  • Cognitive Wi-Fi and disrupting the AP market with Open Source – with Mojo Networks – Wi FiNOW ep 59
  • Open source job opportunities grow at crisis groups

    Learn how you can use your open source skills to make a difference in the world.

  • Why LÖVE?

    This month, IndustrialRobot asked my opinion of FOSS game engines — or, more specifically, why I chose LÖVE.

    The short version is that it sort of landed in my lap, I tried it, I liked it, and I don’t know of anything I might like better. The long version is…

  • Mashape, Creator of Top Open Source API Management Tool Kong, Raises $18M
  • Defense department announces the launch of “Code.mil,” an experiment in open source

    The Department of Defense (DoD) announced the launch of Code.mil, an open source initiative that allows software developers around the world to collaborate on unclassified code written by federal employees in support of DoD projects.

    DoD is working with GitHub, an open source platform, to experiment with fostering more collaboration between private sector software developers and federal employees on software projects built within the DoD. The Code.mil URL redirects users to an online repository that will house code written for a range of projects across DoD for individuals to review and make suggested changes.

    [...]

    DoD faces unique challenges in open sourcing its code. Code written by federal government employees typically does not have copyright protections under U.S. and some international laws, which creates difficulties in attaching open source licenses.

  • RApiDatetime 0.0.1

    Very happy to announce a new package of mine is now up on the CRAN repository network: RApiDatetime.

  • FYI anyone who codes outside work: GitHub has a contract to stop bosses snatching it all

    In contrast to the restrictions many companies place on their workers, GitHub believes it can loosen the reins through the release of its Balanced Employee Intellectual Property Agreement (BEIPA).

    Technology companies often require that employees, as a condition of their employment, sign away the intellectual property rights to any work created while employed, even on personal time. Such contracts may even give companies ownership rights to work created during a limited period after employees leave the company.

San Francisco Open Source Voting System Project Continues On

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OSS

At the February 15 Elections Commission meeting, the Elections Commission voted unanimously to ask the Mayor's Office to allocate $4 million towards initial development of the open source voting project for the 2018-19 fiscal year (from Aug. 2018 - July 2019). This would go towards initial development once the planning phase is complete.

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Modular, open source robotics kit lets you build your own 3D printer

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OSS

Plugg.ee Labs’s Cortex-M3 based “JuicyBoard” robotics kit is designed for building stepper motor controlled devices like 3D printers or CNC routers.

The JuicyBoard has surpassed its modest funding goals on Crowd Supply, providing a modular, open source development kit for stepper motor oriented devices such as 3D printers and CNC routers. Built around an NXP LPC1769 Cortex-M3 MCU, the kits are available starting at $179, with shipments due June 15.

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Leftovers: OSS

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OSS
  • Are Low-Code Platforms a Good Fit for Feds?

    Open-source code platforms — in part, because they’re often free — have long been a popular choice for digital service creation and maintenance.

    In recent years, however, some agencies have turned to low-code solutions for intuitive visual features such as drag-and-drop design functionality. As Forrester Research notes, low-code platforms are "application platforms that accelerate app delivery by dramatically reducing the amount of hand-coding required."

  • Crunchy Data Brings Enterprise Open Source POSTGRESQL To U.S. Government With New DISA Security Technical Implementation Guide

    Crunchy Data — a leading provider of trusted open source PostgreSQL and enterprise PostgreSQL technology, support and training — is pleased to announce the publication of a PostgreSQL Security Technical Implementation Guide (STIG) by the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD), making PostgreSQL the first open source database with a STIG. Crunchy Data collaborated with the Defense Information Systems Agency (DISA) to evaluate open source PostgreSQL against the DoD's security requirements and developed the guide to define how open source PostgreSQL can be deployed and configured to meet security requirements for government systems.

  • Democratizing IoT design with open source development boards and communities

    The Internet of Things (IoT) is at the heart of what the World Economic Forum has identified as the Fourth Industrial Revolution, an economic, technical, and cultural transformation that combines the physical, digital, and biological worlds. It is driven by such technologies as ubiquitous connectivity, big data, analytics and the cloud.

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

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OSS
  • Next-gen developers need master class in open source, says IBM

    The demand for software applications with baked-in cognitive and data science technology is raising expectations of what a developer must bring to the table. Open-source Application Programming Interfaces lower the “concept count” needed, but composing them into next-gen apps will take practice, according to Angel Diaz (pictured), vice president of cloud architecture and technology at IBM.

    “The developer is becoming a cognitive developer and a data science developer in addition to an application developer, and that is the future,” Diaz said.

  • Dell Is Exploring The Use Of Coreboot, At Least Internally

    Dell appears to be using Coreboot on some of their modern Intel Atom motherboards paired with the Intel FSP and TianoCore.

  • How a small team keeps Twitter’s Fail Whale at bay

    Following the strong wake created by the Fail Whale, Twitter created a life raft in the form of stateless containerized micro services. In just a few years, they’ve scaled to hundreds of teams running thousands of services on tens of thousands of hosts and in hundreds of thousands of containers.

    Ian Downes is engineering manager for the compute platform team at Twitter. His team of about 10 engineers and a few other staffers buoys a platform providing container infrastructure to much of the stateless services powering twitter.com and its advertising business. Downes spoke recently at Container World on “Twitter’s Micro Services Architecture: Operational & Technical Challenges.”

  • Teradata Debuts Open Source Kylo™ to Quickly Build, Manage Data Pipelines
  • Teradata Scores Highest in All Use Cases in 2017 Gartner Report: Critical Capabilities for Data Management Solutions for Analytics
  • 5 Legal Risks For Companies Involved in Open Source Software Development

    The reasons that organizations use Open Source Software (OSS) are many and varied. It speeds development, lowers costs, provides flexibility, and facilitates innovation -- all of which add up to a competitive advantage for the organization.

    But there are also challenges and legal risks involved when companies shift from a development model based on custom, in-house development to one based on assembling open source components and coding only the parts that are truly unique to an application.

    In the previous post, we covered six operational challenges that organizations face using OSS.

    In this final post of our series, we’ll review the legal risks and the spectrum of open source licenses involved.

  • How Open-Source Robotics Hardware Is Accelerating Research and Innovation

    The latest issue of the IEEE Robotics & Automation Magazine features a special report on open-source robotics hardware and its impact in the field. We’ve seen how, over the last several years, open source software—platforms like the Robot Operating System (ROS), Gazebo, and OpenCV, among others—has played a huge role in helping researchers and companies build robots better and faster. Can the same thing happen with robot hardware?

  • Thou shalt not depend on me: analysing the use of outdated JavaScript libraries on the web
  • Hello Debugger!

    I’m a huge fan of GDB and DDD, but for anything beyond basic breakpoints, I’ve found myself wading through too much user documentation. What if I want a consistent conditional breakpoint, even if I add or remove earlier code? Never mind setting an initial breakpoint, then adding a data-dependent watchpoint… already, the terminology is getting thick. There has to be a better way.

Leftovers: OSS

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OSS

3 open source link shorteners

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OSS

Nobody likes an impossibly long URL.

They're hard to decipher. But sometimes, between a deep directory structure on a site, plus a large number of parameters tacked on to the end, URLs just begin to get unwieldy. And back in the days before Twitter added their own link shortener to their service, a long URL meant taking precious characters away from your tweets.

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More in Tux Machines

Games for GNU/Linux

  • Cheese Talks: Star Wars Games
    This is a collection of excerpts from my recent Cheese Talks project on the history of Star Wars games focusing on titles that are available on Linux in some form or another.
  • A Game Boy emulator for the Apple Watch, RPG Maker comes to Linux, and more gaming news
    In this bi-weekly open gaming roundup, we take a look at a Game Boy emulator for your Apple Watch, RPG Maker for Linux, Star Citizen switching to Vulkan, and more open gaming news.
  • CrossOver 16.2 Supports Microsoft Outlook 2013, Improves Windows Compatibility
    CodeWeavers' Josh DuBois informed us via an email announcement that the CrossOver 16.2.0 commercial graphical user interface for Wine is now available for GNU/Linux and macOS operating systems. CrossOver 16.2.0 is not a major release of the application that lets Linux and Mac users install and use various apps and games designed for Microsoft Windows, but only a maintenance update that promises to further improve the core Windows compatibility layer, as well as to add better support for some popular applications.

Microsoft v GNU/Linux

  • Illinois residents sue Microsoft over forced Windows 10 upgrades

    The lawyers who have acted on behalf of the trio are looking to have the case expanded to a class action covering every person who has been affected by a forced upgrade from Windows 7 to Windows 10. They allege that there are thousands of such cases.

    The trio claim that Microsoft uses various tactics to get users to upgrade and does not give them a chance to refuse.

  • New Windows 10 courts govt deals

    The system was developed by its joint venture with China Electronics Technology Group Corp, a State-owned company. Equipped with tailor-made security {sic} features, it is expected to allow the US tech giant to regain access to China's lucrative government software procurement market.

  • Microsoft One Drive Bug In Chrome OS And Linux Fixed

Linux Mint KDE Review: Easy And Beautiful

Linux mint, the most popular Linux distribution is recommended by almost all Linux users for newbies. By default, Linux mint is released with cinnamon. But thanks to the Kubuntu team, we now have a KDE edition. Well, new users are probably wondering what all this KDE thing is? KDE is a community. KDE is a compilation of software. We will look at it in more detail on the way. Mint is a whole distro, so we will look at some specific aspects, But KDE is more than just a DE and we cannot review all of its features here. I will try to cover as much as possible in limited space. Read more

today's leftovers

  • Puppet Wins Best DevOps Tool for Open Source at the 2017 DevOps Excellence Awards
  • The goal of HP's radical The Machine: Reshaping computing around memory
    Not every computer owner would be as pleased as Andrew Wheeler that their new machine could run "all weekend" without crashing. But not everyone's machine is "The Machine," an attempt to redefine a relationship between memory and processor that has held since the earliest days of parallel computing. Wheeler is a vice president and deputy labs director at Hewlett Packard Enterprise. He's at the Cebit trade show in Hanover, Germany, to tell people about The Machine, a key part of which is on display in HPE's booth. [...] HPE has tweaked the Linux operating system and other software to take advantage of The Machine's unusual architecture, and released its changes under open source licenses, making it possible for others to simulate the performance of their applications in the new memory fabric.
  • Eudyptula Challenge Status report
    Welcome to another very semi-irregular update from the Eudyptula Challenge.
  • Eudyptula Challenge Status report
    The Eudyptula Challenge is a series of programming exercises for the Linux kernel. It starts from a very basic "Hello world" kernel module, moves up in complexity to getting patches accepted into the main kernel. The challenge will be closed to new participants in a few months, when 20,000 people have signed up.
  • Daimler Jumps on Linux Bandwagon
    Not long ago, if a major corporation were to take out membership in an open source project, that would be big news -- doubly so for a company whose primary business isn't tech related. Times have changed. These days the corporate world's involvement in open source is taken for granted, even for companies whose business isn't computer related. Actually, there's really no such thing anymore. One way or another, computer technology is at the core of nearly every product on the market. So it wasn't surprising that hardly anyone noticed earlier this month when Daimler AG, maker of Mercedes-Benz and the world's largest manufacturer of commercial vehicles, announced it had joined the Open Invention Network (OIN), an organization that seeks to protect open source projects from patent litigation. According to a quick and unscientific search of Google, only one tech site covered the news, and that didn't come until a full 10 days after the announcement was made.
  • ONAP: Raising the Standard for NFV/SDN Telecom Networks [Ed: Amdocs pays the Linux Foundation for editorial control and puff pieces]
    This article is paid for by Amdocs...
  • Plamo 6.2 リリース
    Plamo 6.2 をリリースしました。
  • Dominique Leuenberger: [Tumbleweed] Review of the week 2017/12
    What a week! Tumbleweed once again is the first (to my knowledge) to ship the just released GNOME 3.24.0 as part of its main repository. Being shipped to the users in less than 48 hours since the official release announcement is something we can only do thanks to all the automatic building and testing AND the efforts put into the packages! If packagers would not be at the ball the whole time, this would not be possible. Even though the week has seen ‘only’ 4 snapshots (0317, 0318, 0320 and 0322) the changes delivered to the user base is enormous.
  • VMware Workstation 12.x.x for latest openSUSE Tumbleweed
  • Zero Terminal Mini Linux Laptop Created Using Raspberry Pi Zero W And Smartphone Keyboard
  • Zero Terminal: A DIY handheld Linux PC made from a Raspberry Pi and a cheap iPhone keyboard accessory