Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Gaming

Games: Eastward, Night of the Blood Moon, Heart Chain Kitty

Filed under
Gaming

Games: Crusader Kings II: Holy Fury, Humble Dystopian Bundle, Steam Play, DreamHack Atlanta 2018 and Wine

Filed under
Gaming
  • Crusader Kings II: Holy Fury smites its way to release, some thoughts

    Dealing with all things related to faith and righteous violence, the latest expansion to the venerable medieval strategy title has spiced things up considerably.

  • The Humble Dystopian Bundle is out with some nice Linux games included

    For those of you after some fresh games, The Humble Dystopian Bundle is out and it includes a couple good Linux titles.

    For the PWYW (Pay what you want) tier you will get Beholder and Orwell: Keeping an Eye On You. If you pay more than the current average then Orwell: Ignorance is Strength is yours.

  • Valve has expanded the Steam Play whitelist to include DARK SOULS III and plenty more

    There I am, in bed about to fall asleep when my phone lights up as I forgot to put it on silent. Thankfully so, as it turns out Valve just expanded the Steam Play whitelist and that's always a bit exciting.

    What is the whitelist? These are titles that Valve are confident enough that work out of the box with no additional configuration required. You don't need to turn any extra options on, they should just be click and play like any other Linux game on Steam.

  • Talk to us about open source gaming at DreamHack Atlanta 2018

    Red Hat is excited to sponsor our first esports event, DreamHack Atlanta on November 16-18, 2018. DreamHack is the world’s premier esports festival that celebrates the lifestyle of the gamer, and Red Hat will be there to sponsor a number of activities and provide a technical support booth for attendees who want to talk about gaming on open source platforms.

    Wait, Red Hat and esports? How do those go together?

    The majority of Internet infrastructure runs on Linux. The game servers, the streaming media servers, websites, and other infrastructure that powers online gaming? Much of that is powered by Linux. And Indie games are making a huge push to open source as well. We want to support that, because more open source is always a good thing!

  • Wine 3.0.4 Is En Route With New Icons, Dozens Of Bug Fixes

    Wine 4.0 should be out in early 2019 as the next major stable release of this increasingly used software for running Windows games and applications on Linux and other operating systems. For those not riding the bi-weekly development releases that lead up to the eventual Wine 4.0, Wine 3.0.4 is coming in the days ahead as the latest stable point revision.

    Wine stable point releases tend to be focused just on maintenance/bug/regression fixes, but Wine 3.0.4 will be a bit visibly different in that many Shell32 icons are added to this update. Dozens of Shell32 icons from the Zip and Jaz drive icons to 314k floppy drive icons to the start menu are bundled in Wine 3.0.4.

Games: Latest Titles Available for GNU/Linux

Filed under
Gaming

Latest Games for GNU/Linux

Filed under
Gaming
  • Little Misfortune is a sweet looking adventure, should hopefully get Linux support

    From the same developer who made Fran Bow (which supports Linux), Little Misfortune is what they're calling an interactive story. With a focus on exploration and the characters, including sweet and dark elements with choices that have consequences.

    With that in mind, when I spoke to the developer in regards to a Linux build they said "We will try to have it, yes! :)". Not solid, but a very positive response especially since they've supported Linux before.

  • Luna and the Moonling is a sweet puzzle game that's now available on Linux

    Luna and the Moonling from Greyborn Studios is a colourful puzzle game with an aim to put a new spin on block-pushing puzzle gameplay. Note: Key provided by the developer.

    For those who aren't aware, some of the people from Greyborn Studios previously worked on some pretty major titles like System Shock 2, Thief, Skylanders, Red Faction and quite a few more.

    "From the moment we released in early access last year we’ve had requests from Linux gamers to support the platform," said Michael Ryan, CTO & Technical Director of Greyborn Studios. "We’re big fans of the platform ourselves and were happy to oblige. We really hope Linux users enjoy the game, and welcome them to the Greyborn community," Ryan said.

  • Odd Realm is a sandbox settlement builder inspired by Dwarf Fortress and Rimworld with Linux support
  • Valve gave out more details about Artifact, including some public APIs and pre-order is up

    Artifact, the multi-lane card game from Valve is closing in on release and so Valve have given out a bunch of new details on what to expect.

    Firstly, it's now up for pre-order on Steam for £15.99/$20 and for that price you will get 10 card packs, 5 event tickets, and two complete starter decks. Considering how much such packs cost for real-life card games, that price is actually quite reasonable I think. Additional packs of cards will be $1.99, each pack has 12 random cards. You will also be able to buy and sell cards on the Steam Market.

  • Zeon 25, a retro-inspired hardcore shoot 'em up is now in Early Access

    The Doom-inspired UI bar along the bottom looked quite amusing, haven't really seen many games do something like that in recent years. Looks like it could be worth a shot, the action looks intense enough to keep me interested for sure.

    While it's in Early Access, they're hoping to add a co-op mode along with new maps, new enemies, new levels and so on. The full release is currently scheduled for Q1 2019 although that may change depending on how much feedback they get during development.

  • Neuroslicers is a narrative driven, online competitive cyberpunk RTS that will have Linux support

    Neuroslicers from developer Dream Harvest seems like a very interesting title. A narrative driven, online competitive cyberpunk RTS and it will be coming to Linux.

  • Feral Interactive have put out the system requirements for Total War: WARHAMMER II, due on Linux this month

    Ready your swords and your axe as Total War: WARHAMMER II is heading to Linux this month and Feral Interactive have now put up the system requirements.

  • Here's What You Need to Play Total War: WARHAMMER II on Linux and macOS

    UK based video games publisher Feral Interactive revealed today the official system requirements of the Total War: WARHAMMER II video game for Linux and Mac systems.

    In mid-June, Feral Interactive teased Linux and Mac gamers with the upcoming release of the Total War: WARHAMMER II port for their beloved platforms, the sequel to the critically acclaimed Total War: WARHAMMER video game released more than two years ago. The company said that the Linux and macOS port is coming in November.

    Well, November is here, and now Feral Interactive has revealed the official system requirements for playing the Total War: WARHAMMER II video game on Linux and macOS-powered computers, saying that the port will be available on these two platforms later this month.

  • Warhammer: Vermintide 2 ‘Back to Ubersreik’ DLC Remasters Three Maps From The First Game

    Warhammer: Vermintide 2, Fatshark’s first person rat-murdering action game, will be getting another DLC next month. The Back to Ubersreik DLC takes players to the setting of the first Vermintide game, and will feature remasters of three maps seen in the original Vermintide.

  • Dungeon crawler Ebony Spire: Heresy has a rather nice Anniversary Update that's worth a look

    After managing to sell a few thousand copies, the dungeon crawler Ebony Spire: Heresy has a great update now available.

    For those who missed the story, the developer Bearded Giant Games initially failed to really get anywhere with the game. They wrote a post on Gamasutra about it, where they said it had been a "a soul crushing experience". A pretty sobering reading, as game development has become so much harder in the past few years with stores being flooded with new games. Anyway, many months later they managed to hit over 6,000 sales and so this update is a thank you for keeping the developer going.

Games: Don't Starve, Long Dark and Hazelnut Bastille

Filed under
Gaming

DXVK 0.92

Filed under
Gaming
  • DXVK 0.92 is out with fixes for LA Noire, Shadow of the Tomb Raider and more

    DXVK, the excellent Vulkan-based D3D11 and D3D10 implementation used together with Wine that forms part of Valve's Steam Play has a fresh brew ready. The progress is amazing as always, that's the twenty-sixth release this year!

  • DXVK 0.92 Released With Fixes For Shadow of the Tomb Raider, Other Games

    DXVK 0.92 is the newly-minuted release and it adds support for bit-accurate clears for 11G11B10 UAVs in order to take care of an error message with the Shadow of the Tomb Raider game. DXVK 0.92 also has build issue fixes in conjunction with select versions of Meson, support for the DMOVC instruction that should help out some situations, rendering fixes for LA Noire, and visual issues have been resolved with Lords of the Fallen and The Surge.

Wine and Games: Wine-Staging 3.20 and Virtual Reality at Valve

Filed under
Gaming
  • Wine-Staging 3.20 Released, Fixes A Four Year Old Rendering Bug

    Building off Friday's release of Wine 3.20 is now Wine-Staging 3.20 with minor work added into this testing/experimental blend of Wine that tends to particularly suit gamers better than the upstream code-base.

    Wine-Staging 3.20 still contains more than 850 patches on top of upstream Wine, but at least more patches are being deemed stable and trickling into upstream... Just weeks ago that patch count was closer to 900.

  • Reports: Valve making their own VR HMD and apparently a new VR Half-Life

    It appears Valve are truly getting more serious about Virtual Reality as they appear to be making their own headset. On top of that, apparently a new Half-Life VR game is coming.

    Leaked to an imgur album, which contains multiple shots of the new hardware. These includes shots clearly showing a Valve logo:

Wine 3.20 and Gaming News

Filed under
Gaming
  • Wine Announcement

    The Wine development release 3.20 is now available.

  • Wine 3.20 Released With Several Improvements

    Wine 3.20 is now the latest bi-weekly development release for this increasingly popular code-base for running Windows programs/games on Linux and other operating systems.

    Wine 3.20 brings improvements to its IDL compiler, support for sub-storage transforms within MSIs, RPC/COM marshalling fixes, support for Unicode requests within WinHTTP, and shell auto-complete optimizations.

  • Snapshot Games have cancelled the Linux version of Phoenix Point [Ed: "It's clear Unity has had plenty of Linux issues in the past year though," Liam says. Unity uses Microsoft Mono. Be ready for Microsoft to vandalise GNU/Linux on the desktop by ALL MEANS POSSIBLE. Guess who Microsoft made GitHub's new chief: Mr. Mono.]

    Some news that I'm not particularly happy about. Snapshot Games, which includes X-COM creator Julian Gollop, have announced they've cancelled the Linux version of Phoenix Point.

    As a reminder: After having a succesful Fig campaign last year, where they raised well over $750K which went up to over $780K after it finished, Snapshot Games also gained over $1.2 million in pre-orders from their own store. Linux was a platform advertised during their crowdfunding campaign along with it being clearly listed as a platform on their official website's FAQ. They went on to release two backer builds, both of which had Linux support and ran quite well. After spending quite a number of hours in their second backer beta, I was extremely keen for the third build which was expanding the feature-set quite a lot.

    I ended up speaking to Snapshot Games, who gave me the news ahead of time so I've had a little time to think about this. Even so, I'm really not happy with the situation.

    They put up a dedicated page to talk briefly about it, after I told them not to leave the reasons why up to people's imaginations. Citing reasons like Linux requiring "specialised graphics programming" as it uses OpenGL and not DirectX, they also mentioned that Linux drivers are "not as comprehensive as for Windows and Mac" requiring them to make "adaptations to graphical shaders" to get them working. Additionally, they mentioned the issue of Linux having many distributions, Linux-specific Unity bugs like "not being able to correctly render the video player" and input issues. I won't comment much on those points, since I am not a game developer and so I've no idea how Unity handles different APIs and everything else Unity does. It's clear Unity has had plenty of Linux issues in the past year though.

  • The Wall, a rather unusual FPS game is planning to support Linux

    A recent discovery is The Wall, an usual competitive FPS now in Early Access on Steam and they're planning to support Linux.

    Speaking to the developer on the Steam forum, they said it was "Definitely" coming and then clarified it would be soon after the Early Access release which is out now.

  • Cheap Golf, a retro-styled comedy mini-golf adventure released with Linux support

    Cheap Golf from developer Pixeljam (Dino Run, Starr Mazer: DSP) is a surprisingly good and quite amusing retro-styled mini-golf adventure. A very easy game to get into, since it only requires a single hand to fling the mouse around.

Sony Needs Free Software

Filed under
Hardware
OSS
Gaming
  • Sony using open source emulator for PlayStation Classic plug-and-play

    ReARMed is a popular, modernized branch of the original PCSX emulator, which was actively developed from 2000 to 2003 for Linux, Mac, and Windows. A new branch called PCSX Reloaded picked up that development later in the decade, adding new features and fixing bugs and eventually leading to the ReARMed fork. The emulator supports network play and a "save rewind" feature that lets you easily reverse recent gameplay, two features that seem to be missing from the PlayStation Classic.

  • Playstation Classic is using the open-source PCSX emulator in order to play its games

    A lot of console gamers were hyped when Sony announced the Playstation Classic. However, it appears that Sony has not developed its own emulator and instead it is using the open source PCSX emulator that most PC gamers have been using all these years.

    What ultimately this means is that the overall emulation may not be that “authentic” as some gamers may have expected. We’ve seen this happening in SNES classic and to be honest I was expecting Sony to put some more effort to it.

  • PlayStation Classic Using Open Source Emulator, 50Hz Versions of Games in Europe

    The PlayStation Classic has always seemed like a bit of a hasty attempt by Sony to try and cash in on the popularity of the NES Classic Mini and SNES Classic Mini’s success. Which is fine, of course—the PlayStation brand has a history and a legacy that deserves to be celebrated, too.

    But the hastiness of the effort seems to have compromised it. The list of games on the hardware seems to be, well, not the best, while there are basic baffling decisions like the decision to not have the controllers be the DualShock controllers, instead reverting to the no-analog original controllers.

Games: Steam, Holy Potatoes, OFF GRID, RPCS3 and More

Filed under
Gaming
Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines