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Gaming

Games: CRYENGINE, Epic Car Factory, Godot, Depth of Extinction, Yuzu, GPD

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Gaming

GPD Win 2 – A Pocket-Sized Linux Games Machine?

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Linux
Hardware
Gaming

Dream of owning a pocket-sized Linux games console? Well, your dream just inched a little nearer.

Early reviews of the 6-inch GPD Win 2 pocket computer claim that Linux runs “perfectly” — opening up the possibility to use the device as a portable Steam machine, with your full Linux games library literally in your hand.

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Games: CAPS0ff, Godot, Quake 4, Event[0], Cold Space, Tale of Toast

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Gaming
  • Introducing the CAPS0ff Project

    It's no secret that I love classic video games. Fortunately, thanks to emulation, many of the classic arcade games still can be enjoyed and forever will be available via digital copies of the ROM chips. Sadly, some older systems have protection, making them impossible to dump into ROMs properly. If the chips can't be dumped, how will you ever get a digital copy of the ROM data? Well, the folks over at the CAPS0ff blog actually are disassembling the original chips and painstakingly transcribing the contents one bit at a time. They're literally looking at the chips and determining the 1s and 0s burned onto them.

  • Godot 3.0 Release Candidate 1 Debuts Ahead Of This Imminent Game Engine Release

    The crew responsible for the open-source Godot cross-platform game engine have announced the 3.0 Release Candidate ahead of the imminent stable release of this major update.

  • Dev snapshot: Godot 3.0 RC 1

    So Godot 3.0 won't be a 2017 release as we had hoped during the last semester, but we are pretty confident that you will get it in January 2018 to properly kickstart this new year!

    We fixed hundreds of bugs and declared the release freeze, which means that many non critical bugs and enhancements have been moved to the 3.1 milestone, allowing us to tend faster towards the final 3.0 release by focusing on the big issues.

  • Playing Quake 4 on Linux in 2018

    A few months back I wrote an article outlining the various options Linux users now have for playing Doom 3, as well as stating which of the three contenders I felt to be the best option in 2017. Having already gone to the trouble of getting the original Doom 3 binary working on my modern Arch Linux system, it made me wonder just how much effort it would take to get the closed source Quake 4 port up and running again as well.

  • Looks like the sci-fi narrative exploration game Event[0] may still be coming to Linux

    I know a fair few people were upset by the silence surrounding the previously promised Linux version of Event[0]. It looks like it might still be happening.

    As of a few hours ago, it seems the developer added a Linux content depot, so it seems like they might actually be working on it now. Either that, or it took some time to get it into a state where they could get something up on Steam. I will keep a close on eye on it and let you know of any changes in regards to an actual release.

  • Cold Space, a fast-paced one-shot kill FPS has Linux support

    A rather interesting looking fast-paced FPS released with Linux support recently called Cold Space [Steam, Official Site], I took a look to see if it's any good.

    The Linux build released only a few days ago, not long after the Windows version. The initial announcement said it was only for NVIDIA, but it seems it may work on AMD GPUs now too as it's listed in the system requirements.

  • Tale of Toast, another open world MMO that's going to release with Linux support

    Tale of Toast [Official Site, Steam] is another MMO that will release with Linux support, it will be free to play without any pay to win apparently.

    It will have no classes, open world PvP combat with a zone system that sounds like it might be similar to Albion Online and they're focusing on "quality before quantity" when it comes to the quests that will be available.

Games: Civilization VI, Hex: Shards of Fate, Next Up Hero, Shoppe Keep 2, Cendric and More

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Gaming
  • The “Fall 2017” update for Civilization VI has finally made it to Linux

    I’ll mention it right at the top: there’s still no cross-platform multiplayer as of this update.

    Putting that aside, this latest update makes a few important changes to Civilization VI [Official Site]. Perhaps most notably, religion has seen a reformation of sorts with new units, pantheons, rules and balancing passes that have changed up how that aspect of the game develops. I noticed from a quick game that it’s now much easier to tell apart the different religions of missionaries and see how trade affects the spreading of faith. Likewise, in a similar vein, a lot of the game’s UI has seen a lot of changes for the better. The diplomacy screen has been overhauled and there’s all sorts of small touches that make it simpler to understand the information the game is throwing at you.

    The Khmer and Indonesia are also now in the game as part of a DLC pack. It also adds both a new wonder, Ankor Wat, as well as a natural wonder, Ha Long Bay. Like with the other DLC thus far, there’s also a new scenario included with special rules but, as of the time of writing this article, it’s not selectable on the in-game list. I contacted Aspyr about that omission and I’ve been told that they’ll look into it. Hopefully it’s just something that was overlooked and easily fixed.

  • Hex: Shards of Fate, a digital card game, has unofficial Linux builds available

    This rather fun trading card game has had unofficial builds that run on Linux for a little while now. I tried them out and it’s a pretty fun game, but don’t expect official support anytime soon.

  • Next Up Hero from Digital Continue & Aspyr Media won't be on Linux until the full release

    For those excited by Next Up Hero [Steam, Official Site], the new 2D action game from Digital Continue & Aspyr Media we have somewhat bad news, as there's no Linux support during Early Access.

  • Merchant simulator 'Shoppe Keep 2' to have Linux support at Early Access launch

    The developer of Shoppe Keep 2 [Steam, Official Site] has announced that Linux will be supported in their merchant simulator when it launches in Early Access.

  • Cendric, an RPG and Platformer hybrid will launch on Linux in March

    Cendric [Steam, Official Site] is an interesting discovery, a game this mixes platformer gameplay with an RPG and it will launch with Linux support in March.

    What's interesting, is that the game is open on GitHub, where a lot of the assets are under a mixure of Creative Commons licenses. Unsure about the code, since it isn't mentioned. The actual game engine is custom-made and is based on the SFML library.

  • Voting is now open for our Linux GOTY Awards

Games: Endless Horde, ERSATZ, Spartan Fist, Stellaris: Apocalypse, Feral Interactive, Unity (Mono)

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Gaming
  • Endless Horde is a Tower Defense game about protecting your base from a Zombie invasion

    I thought Endless Horde [Steam] looked like it could be a nice Tower Defense game to kill a few minutes since it's cheap, so I took a look.

    Developed by Ominous Entertainment, the game released with Linux support in April of last year. I let it bake a little longer, but even after waiting this long it's not great.

  • ERSATZ, a fast-paced hardcore action platformer with a musical twist adds Linux support

    Can't get enough hardcore platforming? Good news for you, as the colourful and musical ERSATZ [Steam, Official Site] now supports Linux.

    Originally released for Windows back in September of last year, the Linux version arrived two days ago. The developer said it does have two small differences to the Windows build, one being the "L" key being used to dash and a "shockwave" effect when you slam-hit the ground had to be removed due to graphical issues.

  • First-person puncher roguelike 'Spartan Fist' sounds hilarious and it's coming to Linux

    Spartan Fist [Steam, Official Site], a first-person puncher roguelike from Glass Bottom Games looks fantastic and the good news is that it's heading to Linux.

    It's really great to know that Glass Bottom Games will continue to support Linux, as they previously released Jones On Fire and Hot Tin Roof: The Cat That Wore A Fedora so I was hoping they would. Spartan Fist actually features two characters from those previous games too, but you won't need to play them to enjoy this.

  • Stellaris: Apocalypse expansion announced, prepare to fire the Colossus!
  • Game Porter Feral Interactive Is Up To Around 72 Employees

    For those curious about the financial aspect of porting games to Linux and macOS, Feral Interactive has published their 2017 fiscal year results.

    Well known Linux game porting company Feral Interactive that also brings games to macOS/iOS has filed their latest financial data this week with UK's Companies House for their fiscal year ending 31 March 2017.

  • Unity 2018.1 Introducing A "Scriptable Render Pipeline"

    Unity Technologies has rolled out their first public beta for the Unity 2018.1 release. Exciting us about this game engine update is their Scriptable Render Pipeline.

    The Scriptable Render Pipeline is their new real-time rendering architecture. Scriptable Rendering Pipeline (SRP) is still being developed but is designed to exploit the potential of modern systems, particularly GPUs, and to do so in an easy and efficient manner. SRP is designed to be extensible and can be extended/customized using C# code and material shaders.

Games: Opus Magnum, Killing Floor 2, Where The Water Tastes Like Wine

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Gaming
  • Opus Magnum is an exceptional puzzle game available for Linux

    I decided to bite the bullet and actually pick up a personal copy of Opus Magnum [Steam, Humble Store], I’m glad I did and it's fantastic.

    At first, it’s a little bit like there’s a tiny man inside your brain just shouting “AHH!” as there’s quite a lot to take in, but once you push through the initial brain overload it’s a brilliant experience. I wouldn’t say I was generally a huge puzzle game fan, but Opus Magnum absolutely fascinates me in ways I didn’t think possible.

  • Killing Floor 2 for Linux is 'indefinitely on hold' as they can't find a developer

    Sad news, as it seems there's just no chance of Killing Floor 2 coming to Linux any more as Tripwire can't find a developer.

    Going back to February of last year, Knockout Games sneaked out before that they were working on it, but not all contracts work out of course. I assumed they had parted ways, since later in August of last year Tripwire then said it wasn't in active development. I was hoping Knockout Games (or anyone) was just quietly working on it, but I guess not.

  • Where The Water Tastes Like Wine has a new trailer, musician Sting to star in it

    Where The Water Tastes Like Wine [Steam, Official Site] is an upcoming adventure game from Dim Bulb Games and Serenity Forge has a new trailer to show off some characters, the fun news is that the musician Sting is starring in it.

    Gordon Matthew Thomas Sumner, better know by his stage name of Sting is starring is this new adventure game along side some great actors like: Dave Fennoy (The Walking Dead: A Telltale Games Series), Cissy Jones (Firewatch), Kimberly Brooks (Mass Effect) and many more.

NVIDIA GeForce vs. AMD Radeon Linux Gaming Performance At The Start Of 2018

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Gaming

Here is a fresh look at the NVIDIA GeForce and AMD Radeon Linux graphics card performance as we start 2018. Testing was done using the latest Linux 4.15 Git kernel -- including the KPTI page table isolation support -- as well as using the newest Mesa 17.4-dev driver code for RadeonSI/RADV and on the NVIDIA side is their brand new 390.12 beta driver.

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Games on GNU/Linux

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Gaming

Software and Games: TEA Ebook, Akiee, KDE Discover Software Center and More

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Software
Gaming
  • TEA Ebook – A Modern Ebook App for Stylish Readers

    We have reviewed a good number of ebook apps in the past, most of which have been in development for a long time. Today, we bring you a relatively new app to the application market and it goes by the name of TEA Ebook.

    TEA Ebook is a free and cross-platform EPUB and PDF reader with which you can browse and read through your entire digital library wherever you are, and without an internet connection.

  • Akiee – A Markdown-Based Task Manager for Developers

    Akiee is a cross-platform, AGILE-inspired task manager that helps you to concentrate on your most important tasks by making use of ranks instead of priorities.

    It features a simple UI with three main tabs, Todo, Doing, and Done. A "+" button for adding new tasks, an “Editor” button for editing tasks directly, and an “All” button to list all your tasks.

  •  

  • Discover, the KDE Software Center App, is Improving Nicely

    Many KDE fans –maybe even you– consider the app to be too limited, preferring instead to use an alternative tool like Synaptic or the Muon Software Center to handle package management.

    So popular is Muon that Kubuntu 17.10 even re-added it to its install image!

    But Discover shouldn’t be forgotten about.

    It’s important that Plasma desktop has a vibrant, easy to use, “one-stop-shop” for users to discover, install, update and remove software on their desktops.

  •  

  • Polishing Discover Software Center

    KDE Discover Software Center is a key element of our Usability and Productivity initiative because it encompasses the basic experience of discovering, installing, and removing software. Most regular people don’t want to use the command line to do this, and for them, we have Discover.

  • Breaking apart massive bosses in the Breakout-like 'Puppet Kings', some thoughts

    I have fond memories of Breakout as a child, my son even has a rather low quality version on his 'kids camera' and Puppet Kings [Steam] is an interesting take on it.

  • Need to relax? Guppy is a simple game about trying to survive as a fish

    Since releases are always light at the start of a year, I've been able to look over some more titles sent to our Steam Curator. Guppy [Steam, Official Site] is one such game, that sees you become a fish.

Games: GOG, The Station, EVERSPACE, Turnover

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Gaming
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More in Tux Machines

GNOME: GNOME Shell, Bug Tracking, GXml

  • How to Install GNOME Shell Extensions GUI / CLI
    GNOME Shell extensions are small and lightweight pieces of codes that enhance GNOME desktop’s functionality and improves the user experience. They are the equivalent of add-ons in your browser. For instance, you can have add-ons that download videos like IDM downloader or block annoying ads such as Adblocker. Similarly, GNOME extensions perform certain tasks e.g. Display weather and geolocation. One of the tools used to install and customize GNOME Shell extensions is the GNOME tweak tool. It comes pre-installed in the latest Linux distributions. This article we cover how to install GNOME Shell extensions from GUI and from the command line on various Linux distros.
  • Musings on bug trackers
    I love bugzilla, I really do. I’ve used it nearly my entire career in free software. I know it well, I like the command line tool integration. But I’ve never had a day in bugzilla where I managed to resolve/triage/close nearly 100 issues. I managed to do that today with our gitlab instance and I didn’t even mean to.
  • ABI stability for GXml
    I’m taking a deep travel across Vala code; trying to figure out how things work. With my resent work on abstract methods for compact classes, may I have an idea on how to provide ABI stability to GXml. GXml have lot of interfaces for DOM4, implemented in classes, like Gom* series. But they are a lot, so go for each and add annotations, like Gee did, to improve ABI, is a hard work.

More on Barcelona Moving to Free Software

  • Barcelona Aims To Oust Microsoft In Open Source Drive
    The city of Barcelona has embarked on an ambitious open source effort aimed at reducing its dependence on large proprietary software vendors such as Microsoft, including the replacement of both applications and operating systems.
  • Barcelona to ditch Microsoft software for open source software
    Barcelona, one of the most popular cities in the Europe is now switching to open-source software by replacing Microsoft Windows, Office and Exchange with Linux, Libre Office and Open Xchange respectively. The city council is already piloting the use of Ubuntu Linux desktops along with Mozilla Firefox as the default browser. With this move, Barcelona city is planning to save money over the years by reducing software/service licensing fees. They are also planning to hire new developers to write open-source software. The open-source product will also be made available to other Spanish municipalities and public bodies further afield allowing them the opportunity to save money on software licences.
  • Barcelona to ditch Microsoft in favour of open source Linux software
    Catalan capital Barcelona is planning to ditch proprietary software products from Microsoft in favour of free, open source alternatives such as Open-Xchange email. That’s according to a report by Spain's national paper El Pais, which reports that Barcelona plans to invest 70% of its annual software budget in open source this year.

OSS Leftovers

  • Open Source turns 20
    While open source software is ubiquitous, recognized across industries as a fundamental infrastructure component as well as a critical factor for driving innovation, the "open source" label was coined only 20 years ago. The concept of open source software - as opposed to free software or freeware - is credited to Netscape which, in January 1998, announced plans to release the source code of its proprietary browser, Navigator, under a license that would freely permit modification and redistribution. This code is today the basis for Mozilla Firefox and Thunderbird. The Open Source Initiative (OSI) regards that event as the point at which "software freedom extended its reach beyond the enthusiast community and began its ascent into the mainstream".
  • Coreboot 4.7 Released With 47 More Motherboards Supported, AMD Stoney Ridge
    Coreboot 4.7 is now available as the latest release of this free and open-source BIOS/UEFI replacement. Coreboot 4.7 is the latest tagged release for this project developed via Git. This release has initial support for AMD Stoney Ridge platforms, Intel ICH10 Southbridge support, Intel Denverton/Denverton-NS platform support, and initial work on supporting next-gen Intel Cannonlake platforms.
  • Thank you CUSEC!
    Last week, I spoke at CUSEC (Canadian Undergraduate Software Engineering Conference) in Montreal.   I really enjoy speaking with students and learning what they are working on.  They are the future of our industry!  I was so impressed by the level of organization and the kindness and thoughtfulness of the CUSEC organizing committee who were all students from various universities across Canada. I hope that you all are enjoying some much needed rest after your tremendous work in the months approaching the conference and last week.
  • Percona Announces Sneak Peek of Conference Breakout Sessions for Seventh Annual Percona Live Open Source Database Conference
  • The Universal Donor
    A few people reacted negatively to my article on why Public Domain software is broadly unsuitable for inclusion in a community open source project. Most argued that because public domain gave them the rights they need where they live (mostly the USA), I should not say it was wrong to use it. That demonstrates either parochialism or a misunderstanding of what public domain really means. It should not be used for the same reason code known to be subject to software patents should not be used — namely that only code that, to the best efforts possible, can be used by anyone, anywhere without the need to ask permission (e.g. by buying a patent license) or check it it’s needed (e.g. is that PD code PD here?) can be used in an open source project. Public domain fails the test for multiple reasons: global differences in copyright term, copyright as an unalienable moral rather than as a property right, and more. Yes, public domain may give you the rights you need. But in an open source project, it’s not enough for you to determine you personally have the rights you need. In order to function, every user and contributor of the project needs prior confidence they can use, improve and share the code, regardless of their location or the use to which they put it. That confidence also has to extend to their colleagues, customers and community as well.

Ubuntu: Ubuntu Core, Ubuntu Free Culture Showcase for 18.04, Lubuntu 17.04 EoL

  • Ubuntu Core: A secure open source OS for IoT
    Canonical's Ubuntu Core, a tiny, transactional version of the Ubuntu Linux OS for IoT devices, runs highly secure Linux application packages, known as "snaps," that can be upgraded remotely.
  • Introducing the Ubuntu Free Culture Showcase for 18.04
    Ubuntu’s changed a lot in the last year, and everything is leading up to a really exciting event: the release of 18.04 LTS! This next version of Ubuntu will once again offer a stable foundation for countless humans who use computers for work, play, art, relaxation, and creation. Among the various visual refreshes of Ubuntu, it’s also time to go to the community and ask for the best wallpapers. And it’s also time to look for a new video and music file that will be waiting for Ubuntu users on the install media’s Examples folder, to reassure them that their video and sound drivers are quite operational. Long-term support releases like Ubuntu 18.04 LTS are very important, because they are downloaded and installed ten times more often than every single interim release combined. That means that the wallpapers, video, and music that are shipped will be seen ten times more than in other releases. So artists, select your best works. Ubuntu enthusiasts, spread the word about the contest as far and wide as you can. Everyone can help make this next LTS version of Ubuntu an amazing success.
  • Lubuntu 17.04 has reached End of Life
    The Lubuntu Team announces that as a non-LTS release, 17.04 has a 9-month support cycle and, as such, reached end of life on Saturday, January 13, 2018. Lubuntu will no longer provide bug fixes or security updates for 17.04, and we strongly recommend that you update to 17.10, which continues to be actively supported with security updates and select high-impact bug fixes.