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Gaming

Games: Hollow Knight: Silksong, Warhammer 40,000: Mechanicus and Dusk

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Gaming

Games: Forgiveness, Littlewood, Steam Play and More

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Gaming
  • Forgiveness, a new escape room style puzzle game is coming to Linux this month

    With themes based around the seven deadly sins with psychological-horror vibes, Forgiveness, a new escape room puzzle game is coming to Linux.

  • Littlewood, the peaceful building RPG has been fully funded and it's on the way to Linux

    Unlike a lot of RPGs, Littlewood actually takes place after all the action has been done. It's your job to rebuild and the Kickstarter campaign was a huge success.

    For those who didn't see this before, it's developed by Sean Young (Roguelands, Magicite, Kindergarten) with their own take on the building and crafting type of game taking inspiration from titles like Animal Crossing, Dark Cloud and earlier versions of Runescape.

    Against a funding goal of only $1,500 it managed to pull in $82,061 from 3,952 backers. This means it has smashed through every single stretch-goal that was set.

  • The 2D beat 'em up 'Tunche' is another game funded on Kickstarter and heading to Linux

    Another bit of positive crowdfunding news for you today, as Tunche, the 2D beat 'em up with procedurally generated worlds has been funded and so it's coming to Linux.

    Their Kickstarter campaign managed to get $55,395 from 1,080 backers against their original goal of $35,000. With that funding secured, they managed to break through two stretch goals, which will add in "challenge events" and a "dark heroes expansion pack".

  • The Linux version of Eastshade, the peaceful open-world exploration game is still coming to Linux

    While the Linux version of Eastshade sadly didn't arrive at release, the developer has confirmed it's still coming.

  • Dungeons 3 has a new unexpected DLC out today, adding in another campaign

    I have to hand it to Realmforge Studios and Kalypso Media Digital, they've supported Dungeons 3 exceptionally well since release.

    Not only have they released multiple new (and fully voiced) campaign packs, they also put out a free update earlier this month adding in a new multiplayer map and a powerful new spell can be earned by completing the Clash of Gods expansion.

  • Apparently Valve are working with Easy Anti-Cheat to get support in Steam Play (updated: yup)

    Turns out, this is true. As a Valve developer did reply to a user on the VKx Discord to say "they're probably referring to the ongoing conversation, which is currently stalled by the NDA, yes" which I've now seen myself—thanks for the tip, MartinPL.

  • A look at what games and bundles are on sale ahead of the weekend

    Ah yes, another weekend is about to crash into our lives and so you're looking for a new game to sink some hours into. Let's have a look at what's available.

    First up, itch.io has a Midwinter Selects Bundle available with four games that support Linux and two that don't. The Linux games included are Minit, Wheels of Aurelia, Heaven Will Be Mine and Milkmaid of the Milky Way. The entire bundle is $10 and that's a pretty good price for all of them together.

    GOG have a midweek sale going on for another day or so which has some gems like Owlboy, Pinstripe, Timespinner and more with their prices cut down to size. GOG also have an 11 bit studios sale, with lots of their games going cheap too like Moonlighter and This War of Mine.

  • Fancy working on Wine to help push Steam Play? CodeWeavers are hiring

    What will you need to work with them? They require strong C language skills, you obviously need to be very familiar with Linux, a good understanding of build systems, know your way around debugging problems and so on.

    This is great, if they're after more developers it shows just how serious they are about pushing Steam Play forwards to really improve Linux gaming for those titles that will never come to Linux.

Games: Ethan Lee, "We. The Revolution" and Sid Meier's Civilization VI: Gathering Storm

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Gaming
  • Game porter and Steam Play dev Ethan Lee is running a crowdfunding campaign

    Nintendo's USB GameCube adapter for the Wii U and Switch could soon work on Linux, Mac and Windows if this crowdfunding campaign from Ethan Lee is a success.

    Ethan Lee should be a well-known name to most of our readers, they're responsible for a ridiculous amount of indie games that were ported to Linux (see here). On top of that, they're also now working on Steam Play (Valve's fork of Wine that's integrated with the Steam client on Linux) with Codeweavers and Valve too.

  • We. The Revolution, a unique looking strategy game set during the French Revolution will be on Linux

    For those after a strategy game that certainly looks unique, We. The Revolution is bringing the blood-soaked history of the French Revolution to Linux.

    Developed by Polyslash with a publishing hand from Klabater, it's going to release with same-day Linux support on March 21st.

  • Sid Meier's Civilization VI: Gathering Storm is out with Linux support as expected

    Sid Meier's Civilization VI: Gathering Storm, the massive new expansion has arrived and as expected Aspyr Media managed to get in support for Linux right away. Note: Key provided by Aspyr Media.

    This is the second major expansion for the game, following on from Rise and Fall which launched on Linux back in March last year. You can see some thoughts on that one from BTRE here.

Games: GNU/Linux Steam Turns 6, Hollow Knight: Silksong, Iron Marines, Ashes of the Singularity: Escalation

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Gaming
  • Six years ago today, Steam was released for Linux - Happy Birthday

    Happy official birthday to the Steam client for Linux, today marks six years since it released for everyone.

    Who would have thought we would have everything we do now back in 2013? We've come a seriously long way! In that time we've seen the rise and fall of the Steam Machine and Steam Link (now available as an app), the Steam Controller, the HTC Vive headset and plenty more.

    We now have well over five thousand games available on the Steam store that support Linux. That's a ridiculous amount, considering we're still a very small platform even in comparison to Mac when going by the current Steam Hardware Survey showing the market share.

  • Team Cherry has announced Hollow Knight: Silksong, coming to Linux

    The sequel to Hollow Knight has now been officially announced by Team Cherry as Hollow Knight: Silksong.

  • Iron Marines from Ironhide Game Studio will be coming to Linux

    Ironhide Game Studio (Kingdom Rush) are working on a new real-time strategy game named Iron Marines and they've confirmed to us it's heading to Linux.

    As we follow them on Twitter, we saw them link to the Steam page. Upon viewing it, we noticed it only listed Windows and Mac. After sending a quick message to them on Twitter, to ask if it will come to Linux they replied with an amusing gif that said "For Sure"—so there you have it!

  • Another little update on Ashes of the Singularity: Escalation for Linux

    While Stardock haven't managed to get Ashes of the Singularity: Escalation onto Linux just yet, they did give another small update last month.

Games: Civilization VI: Gathering Storm, Slipstream, CS:GO Fixes

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Gaming
  • Civilization VI: Gathering Storm should see day-1 Linux support tomorrow

    Looks like we're in for a treat with the big new expansion, Civilization VI: Gathering Storm, as it's releasing tomorrow.

    This is excellent, since we've ended up waiting far too long for previous updates. Good to see Aspyr on top form for this, showing how it should be done so kudos to their team for this nice surprise.

  • Slick retro racer 'Slipstream' has arrived on GOG

    Now even more can enjoy another very good retro racing game, as Slipstream has screeched over onto GOG.

    This one is a little bit special, not only is it a true gem that feels like a classic with some upgrades, it was also developed on Linux too (specifically Ubuntu and Arch Linux) using Krita, Blender and GIMP for the graphics and Intellij IDEA CE for the coding! You can see some previous thoughts on it here.

    As a reminder, this is yet another game that was funded and put on Linux thanks to a Kickstarter campaign, which ran back in 2016.

  • CS:GO update fixes controversial radar exploit ahead of IEM Katowice Major - February 12 patch notes

    The update also fixed a crucial issue for game client crashes that plagued players on the OSX and Linux platforms.

Games: Arcade Spirits, Rocket League, Ancient Warfare 3 and Tannenberg

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Gaming

Games: 6 Months With GNU/Linux, CS:GO Danger Zone Fixes and Wraithslayer

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Gaming

Games: Unreal Engine 4.22 Preview 1, Warhammer 40,000: Mechanicus, Humble Great GameMaker Games Bundle

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Gaming
  • Unreal Engine 4.22 Preview 1 now available

    Unreal Engine 4.22 will be releasing soon with a number of fixes and updates. In the meantime, the first Preview is now available for download from the Epic Games launcher.

    Preview 1 includes support for real-time ray tracing, Editor Utility Widgets, Blueprint indexing optimizations, virtual production updates, Oculus Quest support and the Unreal Audio Engine is now on by default for new projects.

    A full list of the upcoming changes to this build are available on the Unreal Engine forums. We invite you to provide feedback on Preview 1, and all subsequent releases. Please keep in mind that Preview releases are intended only to provide a sample of what is going to be released in the update and are not production-ready.

  • Unreal Engine 4.22 Preview 1 Released With Real-Time Ray-Tracing

    Unreal Engine 4.21 back in November was a big update for Linux gamers in that this game engine now defaults to the Vulkan renderer and also had various other fixes. With today's Unreal Engine 4.22 Preview 1 release, there are no Linux/Vulkan-specific changes mentioned, but some other interesting changes in general.

    The release notes as of Unreal Engine 4.22 Preview 1 don't indicate any Vulkan or Linux focused changes, but aside from that there is some interesting changes. Arguably most interesting is having experimental support for real-time ray-tracing and path tracing though sadly that's limited for now to Direct3D 12 with DXR and not yet any Vulkan ray-tracing support.

  • Warhammer 40,000: Mechanicus officially released for Linux, more content on the way

    Bulwark Studios and Kasedo Games have officially released Warhammer 40,000: Mechanicus for Linux after having a 'soft launch' in December last year.

  • The Humble Great GameMaker Games Bundle is out with some sweet Linux games

    It's almost midweek, time to refresh that gaming collection of yours with The Humble Great GameMaker Games Bundle that has some Linux games available.

Games: Million to One Hero, Barotrauma, JUMPGRID and Pygame

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Gaming
  • Fun platformer 'Million to One Hero' where you can make your own adventures is releasing soon

    Million to One Hero from Spanish developer Over the Top Games seems like a very promising platformer and they've announced the release is this month.

    We previously highlighted the game earlier this month, at that time they did not have a release date available. They've since announced that it's going to be available on Linux right at release, which will be on February 27th.

  • Barotrauma, a co-op submarine adventure set on Jupiter's moon Europa is promising, has a demo

    For those after a more sci-fi take on the co-op submarine adventure, Barotrauma seems like it could be quite fun.

    Currently in a closed-beta before an Early Access release on Steam, you can actually grab an earlier version direct from their website here. They're not taking on any more for the closed-beta, so the demo should still give a small glimpse into what's possible.

  • JUMPGRID is a fantastic 2D dodge-em-up that will give your fingers a workout

    Did you enjoy Super Hexagon? JUMPGRID is a brand new dodge-em-up with simple and addictive gameplay. Note: Key provided by the developer.

  • Moving the player object in Pygame

    In the last chapter we have created the animation effect for the player object and in this chapter, we will move the player object in the x-axis. We will leave the wall and boundary collision detection mechanism to the next chapter. In the last chapter we have already linked up the keyboard events with the game manager class and in this chapter, we only need a slight modification to move the player across the scene when the left or the right arrow key has been pressed. One of the problems with the pygame event module is that we need to activate the repeated event detection process by our-self with this single line of code before the module can send the repeated keypress event (which means when someone is holding the same key on the keyboard) to us.

Games: Adapt or Perish, Axis & Allies Online, Total War: THREE KINGDOMS and Pygame

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Gaming
  • Adapt or Perish, the open world customizable RTS is now out

    Adapt or Perish, the latest game from Phr00t's Software is officially out today. It's an open world RTS with a huge amount of customization thanks to your ability to design your own units.

  • Beamdog have announced Axis & Allies Online, an official adaptation of the tabletop classic

    Beamdog have just announced their latest game, Axis & Allies Online [Official Site], an official adaptation of the tabletop classic and it's coming to Linux.

    Awesome news, since Beamdog have supported Linux well with their previous games like Neverwinter Nights: Enhanced Edition, Baldur's Gate: Enhanced Edition, Planescape: Torment: Enhanced Edition and more.

  • Total War: THREE KINGDOMS has been delayed

    While we know that Total War: THREE KINGDOMS is coming to Linux thanks to a port from Feral Interactive, it's not clear when and now it's been delayed.

    Originally confirmed for Linux back in September of last year, where they said it would be available "shortly after" the Windows version. The Total War team has today announced that the Windows version has now moved to release on May 23rd, so we're in for a longer wait.

  • Create the player animation

    Hello and welcome back, in this chapter we will create a method which will accept either an x increment or y increment from the game manager object that accepts those increments from the main pygame file when the user presses on the up, down, left or the right arrow key on the keyboard. We will not make the player moves yet in this chapter but just animate that player object, we will make the player moves in the next chapter. There are three files that we need to edit here. First is the player sprite class, we will add in the set x and set y method which will later use to animate the player object.

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More in Tux Machines

Opening Files with Qt on Android

After addressing Android support in KF5Notifications another fairly generic task that so far required Android specific code is next: opening files. Due to the security isolation of apps and the way the native “file dialog” works on Android this is quite different from other platforms, which makes application code a bit ugly. This can be fixed in Qt though. Read more

Android Leftovers

Ubuntu-Centric Full Circle Magazine and Debian on the Raspberryscape

  • Full Circle Magazine: Full Circle Weekly News #121
  • Debian on the Raspberryscape: Great news!
    I already mentioned here having adopted and updated the Raspberry Pi 3 Debian Buster Unofficial Preview image generation project. As you might know, the hardware differences between the three families are quite deep ? The original Raspberry Pi (models A and B), as well as the Zero and Zero W, are ARMv6 (which, in Debian-speak, belong to the armel architecture, a.k.a. EABI / Embedded ABI). Raspberry Pi 2 is an ARMv7 (so, we call it armhf or ARM hard-float, as it does support floating point instructions). Finally, the Raspberry Pi 3 is an ARMv8-A (in Debian it corresponds to the ARM64 architecture). [...] As for the little guy, the Zero that sits atop them, I only have to upload a new version of raspberry3-firmware built also for armel. I will add to it the needed devicetree files. I have to check with the release-team members if it would be possible to rename the package to simply raspberry-firmware (as it's no longer v3-specific). Why is this relevant? Well, the Raspberry Pi is by far the most popular ARM machine ever. It is a board people love playing with. It is the base for many, many, many projects. And now, finally, it can run with straight Debian! And, of course, if you don't trust me providing clean images, you can prepare them by yourself, trusting the same distribution you have come to trust and love over the years.

OSS: SVT-AV1, LibreOffice, FSF and Software Freedom Conservancy

  • SVT-AV1 Already Seeing Nice Performance Improvements Since Open-Sourcing
    It was just a few weeks ago that Intel open-sourced the SVT-AV1 project as a CPU-based AV1 video encoder. In the short time since publishing it, there's already been some significant performance improvements.  Since the start of the month, SVT-AV1 has added multi-threaded CDEF search, more AVX optimizations, and other improvements to this fast evolving AV1 encoder. With having updated the test profile against the latest state as of today, here's a quick look at the performance of this Intel open-source AV1 video encoder.
  • Find a LibreOffice community member near you!
    Hundreds of people around the world contribute to each new version of LibreOffice, and we’ve interviewed many of them on this blog. Now we’ve collected them together on a map (thanks to OpenStreetMap), so you can see who’s near you, and find out more!
  • What I learned during my internship with the FSF tech team
    Hello everyone, I am Hrishikesh, and this is my follow-up blog post concluding my experiences and the work I did during my 3.5 month remote internship with the FSF. During my internship, I worked with the tech team to research and propose replacements for their network monitoring infrastructure. A few things did not go quite as planned, but a lot of good things that I did not plan happened along the way. For example, I planned to work on GNU LibreJS, but never could find enough time for it. On the other hand, I gained a lot of system administration experience by reading IRC conversations, and by working on my project. I even got to have a brief conversation with RMS! My mentors, Ian, Andrew, and Ruben, were extremely helpful and understanding throughout my internship. As someone who previously had not worked with a team, I learned a lot about teamwork. Aside from IRC, we interacted weekly in a conference call via phone, and used the FSF's Etherpad instance for live collaborative editing, to take notes. The first two months were mostly spent studying the FSF's existing Nagios- and Munin-based monitoring and alert system, to understand how it works. The tech team provided two VMs for experimenting with Prometheus and Nagios, which I used throughout the internship. During this time, I also spent a lot of time reading about licenses, and other posts about free software published by the FSF.
  • We're Hiring: Techie Bookkeeper
    Software Freedom Conservancy is looking for a new employee to help us with important work that supports our basic operations. Conservancy is a nonprofit charity that promotes and improves free and open source software projects. We are home to almost 50 projects, including Git, Inkscape, Etherpad, phpMyAdmin, and Selenium (to name a few). Conservancy is the home of Outreachy, an award winning diversity intiative, and we also work hard to improve software freedom generally. We are a small but dedicated staff, handling a very large number of financial transactions per year for us and our member projects.