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Gaming

Games: Doom's' 25th Anniversary, Unvanquished, Star Ruler 2, Humble Indie Mega Week

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Gaming
  • Game Engine Black Book: DOOM

    Today is Doom's' 25th anniversary. To mark the occasion, Fabien Sanglard has written and released a book, Game Engine Black Book: DOOM.

  • DOOM Changed the Game 25 Years Ago Today

    Doom was one of the most influential video games of all time. It was state of the art in 1993, and it was literally a game changer.

    It’s hard to overstate just how much it changed the character of video gaming. Looking through the eyes of an action game’s hero was a novel experience, one first made possible by John Carmack and John Romero with their previous hit, Wolfenstein 3D.

    This game was everywhere. You couldn’t walk into a computer store in the 90s without seeing it on half a dozen screens. Shops would run it on their best, fastest computer to demonstrate how fast that computer was. The bigger and more powerful the computer got, the faster the game ran on the computer, and the top of the line 486 and Pentium computers could display the game full-screen at 30 frames per second—something that had mostly been impossible with a 3D game up until that point. People would buy new computers just to run that game; chances are it made more money for the hardware makers than it did for Id.

  • Cumulus Networks Partners with Lenovo, Unvanquished Game Announces First Alpha in Almost Three Years, KDE Frameworks 5.53.0 Released, Git v2.20.0 Is Now Available and Major Milestone WordPress Update

    Developers of the open-source game Unvanquished announce a new alpha release, Unvanquished Alpha 51 today, marking their first release in almost three years. According to Phoronix, the beta should drop soon as well. See the game's website for details.

  • Star Ruler 2 Now Available to Install via Snap in Ubuntu

    Star Ruler 2, a space 4X / RTS hybrid developed by Blind Mind Studios, now can easily installed in Ubuntu 16.04, Ubuntu 18.04 and higher via Snap package.

  • Humble are doing an 'Indie Mega Week' that's worth a look for some cheap Linux games

    Take the chill off with some toasty new games, now with money off in the Humble Indie Mega Week sale.

Games Leftovers

Filed under
Gaming
  • The Linux version of Civilization VI has been updated with cross-platform multiplayer support

    Just in time for the holidays, Linux gamers finally have version parity with other platforms. Expect to be able to spend just one more turn playing with friends on other operating systems.

  • John Romero has announced a free unofficial spiritual successor to The Ultimate DOOM's 4th episode

    John Romero, one of the co-founders of id Software has revealed he's been working on SIGIL, a free megawad for the original 1993 DOOM.

    [...]

    These boxes, will contain music from Buckethead, along with a custom song written expressly for SIGIL. A tempting purchase for any big DOOM fan, I especially love the sound of a 16GB 3-1/2-inch floppy disk-themed USB. You have until December 24, 2018 to order one and I imagine stock will go quite quickly.

  • Unvanquished Open-Source Game Sees Its First Alpha Release In Nearly Three Years

    Unvanquished had been easily one of the most promising open-source games several years back with decent in-game visuals/art, a continually improving "Daemon" engine that was a distant mod of ioquake3 while leveraging ETXReaL components and more, and all-around a well-organized, advancing open-source game project. Their monthly alpha releases stopped almost three years ago while today that's changed just ahead of Christmas.

    The Unvanquished developers announced Unvanquished Alpha 51 today as their first release in two years and eight months after having made fifty monthly alpha releases. While this is the fifty-first alpha, the developers say they should soon be ready for the beta drop.

  • Unvanquished, the free and open source shooter has a huge new release now out

    After being quiet for some time, the Unvanquished team is back and they have quite a lot to show off in the new release of their free and open source shooter.

    This is their first new release since April 2016, so the amount that's changed is quite striking! Hopefully, this will be the start of regular release once again, since they used to do monthly releases a few years ago and it was fun to watch it grow.

  • Valve adds even more gamepad support to their latest client beta

    Valve are continuing to support as many devices as possible with a new Steam client beta now available.

    Since there's no gamepad to rule them all, it makes sense for Valve to support as many as they can. Even though I love the Steam Controller, I do understand that it's not going to be a good fit for everyone. Now, Steam will support the PowerA wired/wireless GameCube Style controllers, PowerA Enhanced Wireless Controller and the PDP Faceoff Wired Pro Controller to boost their already rather large list of supported devices.

  • The turn-based tactical RPG Fell Seal: Arbiter's Mark is coming along nicely

    After a few months in Early Access, the tactical RPG Fell Seal: Arbiter's Mark has come along nicely and it's quite impressive.

    It became available on Steam back in August, this was with same-day Linux support as promised from developer 6 Eyes Studio after their successful Kickstarter.

  • Citra, the Nintendo 3DS emulator now has 'Accurate Audio Emulation'

    Citra, the impressive and quickly moving Nintendo 3DS emulator has a new progress report out and it sounds great.

    They've made some great progress on accurate audio emulation, with their new "LLE (Accurate)" option. They say this has enabled games like Pokémon X / Y, Fire Emblem Fates and Echoes and more to work. There's a downside though, that currently the performance does take quite a hit with it so they're still recommending the "HLE (Fast)" setting for now.

    They go into quite a lot of detail about how they got here, with plenty of bumps along the way. Most of the work towards this, was done by a single developer who suffered a bit of a burn-out over it.

  • Mindustry, an open source sandbox Tower Defense game that's a little like Factorio

    Available under the GPL, the developer originally made it for the GDL Metal Monstrosity Jam which happened back in 2017 and it ended up winning! Seems the developer didn't stop development after this, as they're currently going through a new major release with regular alpha builds.

  • Have graphical distortions in Unity games with NVIDIA? Here's a workaround

    It seems a lot of Unity games upgrading to later versions of Unity are suffering from graphical distortions on Linux with an NVIDIA GPU. There is a workaround available.

Snake your way across your Linux terminal

Filed under
Linux
Gaming

Welcome back to the Linux command-line toys advent calendar. If this is your first visit to the series, you might be asking yourself what a command-line toy even is. It's hard to say exactly, but my definition is anything that helps you have fun at the terminal.

We've been on a roll with games over the weekend, and it was fun, so let's look at one more game today, Snake!

Snake is an oldie but goodie; versions of it have been around seemingly forever. The first version I remember playing was one called Nibbles that came packaged with QBasic in the 1990s, and was probably pretty important to my understanding of what a programming language even was. Here I had the source code to a game that I could modify and just see what happens, and maybe learn something about what all of those funny little words that made up a programming language were all about.

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Games: DiRT 4, SuperTuxKart and The 10 Best Free Linux Games

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Gaming
  • DiRT4 Power Slides onto Linux in 2019

    DiRT 4 is the latest instalment of the popular franchise to drift on to free software platforms (as well as a non-free software platform in macOS). It follows on from the successful Linux release of DiRT Rally last spring.

    DiRT 4 was originally released on Windows, PlayStation 4 and Xbox One in June 2017 and has garnered plenty of praise, positive reviews and high review scores.

  • SuperTuxKart Spruces Up Its In-Game Visuals

    SuperTuxKart, the famous free software kart racer, is picking up some improved visuals within the in-game user interface and racing screens.

    Detailing their plans on the game’s official dev blog, the team behind the iconic racer have shared more details about the graphical spit and polish they’ve given the game ahead of its next major release.

  • Refreshing the GUI

    Online multiplayer won't be the focus of this new blog post : we will tell you more about it when launching the official beta in the coming weeks.

    Instead, we'll tell you more about the many changes in the game's UI.

  • The 10 Best Free Linux Games

    There are plenty of excellent games on Linux, and a fair amount of them are completely free. Some are open source, and others are fairly big names available through Steam. In every case, these are quality games that you can play any time on Linux at absolutely no cost.

Editorial: An open letter to Valve on why they should keep on embracing Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Gaming

News in the last week, heck, in the last few weeks and months have the potential to shake up the games industry significantly. It certainly may have huge repercussions for Linux gaming. It’s also been a little hard to follow sometimes, so I decided to explain many of the developments of the past few months and put them within an easy-to-understand context.

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Games: Inside, Dirt 4, Sundered: Eldritch Edition

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Gaming

Play Tetris at your Linux terminal

Filed under
Linux
Gaming

Thanks for joining us for today's installment of the Linux command-line toys advent calendar. If this is your first visit to the series, you might be asking yourself, what’s a command-line toy. Even I'm not quite sure, but generally, it could be a game or any simple diversion that helps you have fun at the terminal.

It's quite possible that some of you will have seen various selections from our calendar before, but we hope there’s at least one new thing for everyone.

I promised when I started this series I'd be including games, but so far I've neglected to, so let's fix that with today's selection: Tetris.

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Games: Beyond Blue, The Stanley Parable: Ultra Deluxe, DiRT 4, Blackout and EmptyEpsilon

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Gaming

AMD Radeon RX 590 Linux Benchmarks, 18-Way NVIDIA/AMD Gaming Comparison

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Gaming

With the very newest AMDGPU Linux kernel patches, the Radeon RX 590 is now working correctly on Linux. Here's a look at how this latest Polaris graphics card is performing for Linux games against seventeen other AMD Radeon and NVIDIA GeForce graphics cards in a variety of OpenGL and Vulkan benchmarks.

AMD launched the Radeon RX 590 in mid-November as a Polaris shrink down to 12nm and featuring 36 compute units, a base frequency up to 1469MHz and boost up to 1545MHz, 2304 Stream processors, 8GB of GDDR5 video memory, and is rated for up to 7.1 TFLOPs of performance potential.

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Games: A Hat in Time and Gravel, Counter-Strike: Global Offensive, Stellaris MegaCorp

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Gaming
  • Looks like both A Hat in Time and Gravel are coming to Linux, ports from Virtual Programming

    Virtual Programming seem to be busy once again which is good news, turning up on their website recently was both A Hat in Time and Gravel.

  • Counter-Strike: GO Goes Battle Royale With Danger Zone

    With the success of Fortnite and Player Unknown's Battlegrounds in the "battle royale" genre, Valve is getting in on the action with CS:GO Danger Zone.

    [...]

    Sadly they seem to be behind in their previously expressed goal of switching CS:GO over to Vulkan with the Linux version still appearing to rely upon OpenGL.

  • Counter-Strike: Global Offensive introduces a Battle Royale mode, goes free to play

    Valve have released Danger Zone, a Battle Royale mode for Counter-Strike: Global Offensive along with it going free to play.

    All existing players have been upgraded to "Prime Status", which is a special status for verified players and only matches you against other Prime players. To become Prime after this update, you need to either purchase Prime from the Steam page or "reach Rank 21 by earning XP and add an eligible phone number to your Steam account" according to Valve.

    [...]

    This is what I have been waiting for. An interesting Battle Royale game available on Linux with good support and since it's Valve it will no doubt work well on Linux. Not only that, it's likely going to actually be an active game, especially since it's free.

  • Stellaris MegaCorp expansion and the 2.2 'Le Guin' free update are now both out

    Once again, Paradox have put out more content both paid and free for Stellaris and my love of the game continues on rather strong.

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More in Tux Machines

Devices: Raspberry Pi, Winmate (With Intel ME Back Doors), and Purism

  • Raspberry Pi projects for IT professionals

    The single-board design is affordable and has been used to promote computer science in schools. Despite this and a strong consumer base, the applications for Raspberry Pi have become more advanced over the years beyond just education and is being used in industry too.

    There are various ways the Raspberry Pi can be embedded to create huge value in the enterprise world. Such projects developed using Raspberry Pi may transform traditional businesses.

    Here are some ways to use Raspberry Pi effectively in your business.

  • Apollo Lake mini-PC offers WiFi and a USB Type-C port with DP
    Winmate’s rugged, Linux-friendly “EAC Mini EACIL22S” mini-PC runs on an Intel Apollo Lake processor and offers 64GB eMMC, WiFi, a DisplayPort-ready USB Type-C port, and dual GbE and USB 2.0 ports, Winmate has begun adding some Linux-supported systems to its largely Windows-driven embedded lineup, including the recent FM10A VMC touch-panel computer for forklifts. Now, it has launched a rugged, Apollo Lake based mini-PC with Ubuntu 16.04, Linux 4.1.5, or Win 10 IoT Enterprise. The 115 x 90 x 31mm, 0.8 Kilogram EAC Mini EACIL22S follows a similar, but NXP i.MX6 based, EAC Mini EACFA20 system that runs Android 6.0.
  • Break Free from Privacy Prison with Purism
    As 2018 comes to a close, people around the world have to face the stark truth of surveillance capitalism. Nearly all consumer products — speakers, phones, cars, and perhaps even mattresses — are recording devices, storing metrics on our movements and behavior. The New York Times just published a detailed report on location tracking in leaky Android and iOS apps. That’s just a fact of life when people use smartphones, right? Wrong. In 2019, Purism’s Librem 5 smartphone will be proof that no one has to live with spies in their pockets. If anything has changed since Facebook’s Cambridge Analytica scandal, it’s that more and more people are jumping ship from the Frightful Five: Google, Amazon, Facebook, Apple, and Microsoft. At Purism, we offer an alternative to the polluted software ecosystems of these tech giants. Our code is Free and Open-Source Software (FOSS), the industry standard in security because it can be verified by experts and amateurs alike. The software on our Librem laptops and our upcoming phone stands on a strong, foundational chain of trust that is matched by hardware features such as kill switches. These switches give people the added assurance that their devices won’t record or “phone home” to advertisers, spies, and cyber criminals. Turn off WiFi, microphone, and webcam on the Librem 5 and they’re off, no question about it.

Graphics: V3D, AMD/Vega, Flicker-Free Boot

  • V3D Compute, VC4 display, PM
    For V3D last week, I resurrected my old GLES 3.1 series with SSBO and shader imgae support, rebuilt it for V3D 4.1 (shader images no longer need manual tiling), and wrote indirect draw support and started on compute shaders. As of this weekend, dEQP-GLES31 is passing 1387/1567 of tests with “compute” in the name on the simulator. I have a fix needed for barrier(), then it’s time to build the kernel interface. In the process, I ended up fixing several job flushing bugs, plugging memory leaks, improving our shader disassembly debug dumps, and reducing memory consumption and CPU overhead.
  • AMD Outs New Vega 10 & 20 IDs With Linux Driver Patch
    AMD may have accidentally revealed some new products containing its Radeon RX Vega 10 and Radeon RX Vega 20 graphics technologies. The company patched its RadeonSI Mesa and AMDKFD/AMDGPU kernel drivers with new PCI IDs; no other changes were made with the patch. Phoronix reported that the patch added six new IDs released to Vega 10: 0x6869, 0x686A, 0x686B, 0x686D, 0x686E, and 0x686F. These are new IDs that were previously only referenced in an update to macOS Mojave and GPUOpen's lists of GFX9 parts. That could mean AMD plans to introduce new Vega 10 products sooner than later, but the company might also be internally testing new products that are a ways from release.
  • AMD Files Trademark For Vega II
    It looks like AMD could be announcing Vega II as new 7nm Vega GPUs soon complementing the recently announced Vega 20 Radeon Instinct MI50 / MI60 accelerators.
  • Arch Linux Users With Intel Graphics Can Begin Enjoying A Flicker-Free Boot
    It looks like the recent efforts led by Red Hat / Fedora on providing a flicker-free Linux boot experience and thanks to their upstream-focused approach is starting to pay off for the other desktop Linux distributions... A flicker-free boot experience can now be achieved on Arch Linux with the latest packages, assuming you don't have any quirky hardware.  A Phoronix reader reported in earlier today that Arch Linux as of the 4.19.8-arch1-1-ARCH kernel is working out well for the seamless/flicker-free boot experience. The caveat though -- like with Fedora -- is that it only works with Intel graphics hardware/driver for now and does require setting the "i915.fastboot=1" kernel module parameter.

today's howtos

Android Leftovers