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Gaming

SteamOS Has Received Support For Third Party Controllers

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Debian
Gaming

Also, the system compositor has been updated, the system being capable to recognize many more third party controllers.

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Steam Is Slowly Becoming a Monopoly on Linux

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Linux
Gaming

Valve is now the biggest service that distributes games for Linux and it looks like it’s the best thing that’s happened for this platform in a long time. The problems with this picture is that Steam is slowly transforming into a monopoly, which is never a good thing.

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Create a game with Scratch on Raspberry Pi

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GNU
Linux
Gaming
HowTos

While Scratch may seem like a very simplistic programming language that’s just for kids, you’d be wrong to overlook it as an excellent first step into coding for all age levels. One aspect of learning to code is understanding the underlying logic that makes up all programs; comparing two systems, learning to work with loops and general decision-making within the code.

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Leftovers: Games

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Gaming

Linux Becoming a ‘First Class Member’ of the Unreal Engine Family

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GNU
Linux
Gaming

Unreal Engine developers Epic Games hope to make Linux a “first class member” of the Unreal Engine family for both gamers and developers.

While Unreal Tournament’s return to Linux was good news for gamers, developers could’ve been left with subpar tooling that would make it harder for indie developers and large game studios alike to justify the effort to adapt their complex workflows to our favourite OS.

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With Valve On Linux, Has LGP Lost All Relevance?

Filed under
Linux
Gaming

Most Linux gamers don't want to spend $30+ USD for some game that's several years old where they may already own the Linux copy, they could buy the Windows copy for just a few dollars, and where it runs fine under Wine/CrossOver software. With Valve on Linux, we'll be getting fresh games and if you have the game already on Mac OS X or Windows, it should be available from the Steam Linux client (assuming it's been ported to Linux).

The old titles from LGP also aren't anything that were even really compelling when originally released, with most Windows gamers likely never even having heard of them, like Gorky 17, Hyperspace Delivery Boy, and Gorky 17. The few worthwhile games out of Linux Game Publishing were Shadowgrounds, X2/X3, Postal II, and Cold War.

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Steam's In-Home Steaming Is a Wake-up Call for Windows, Linux Is Growing Stronger

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GNU
Linux
Microsoft
Gaming

Now that Valve has made the In-Home Steaming feature available to everyone who is using Steam, you might ask yourself if it's of any use for the majority of the Linux players, but that's not the most important question. This seemingly unimportant feature has much broader implications and it might be the game changer in the competition between Windows and Linux.

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Leftovers: Gaming

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Gaming

SteamOS Receives Security Updates from Debian

Filed under
Debian
Gaming

Valve has two builds for SteamOS. One is a stable version (sort of) and the other one is a Beta (Alchemist). Up until a week ago the two versions have been almost identical, which meant that maintaining two different branches was really nonsensical. This has started to change and Valve has released a second Beta in just a few days, making some important updates.

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Linux Users Can Now Play Windows Games on Steam with In-Home Streaming

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Linux
Microsoft
Gaming

The In-Home Streaming feature allows users to stream games from a Windows operating system to a Linux-powered machine that also runs Steam. This is the solution proposed by Valve that practically enables Linux gamers to play any Windows-only titles, although it's rather cumbersome, to say the least.

Like any other major Steam update, the latest has been preceded by a flurry of smaller ones in the Beta branch of the software. This is basically just a collection of those features and fixes that were already available for all users of Steam Beta.

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Android/Google Leftovers

3 open source alternatives to Office 365

It can be hard to get away from working and collaborating on the web. Doing that is incredibly convenient: as long as you have an internet connection, you can easily work and share from just about anywhere, on just about any device. The main problem with most web-based office suites—like Google Drive, Zoho Office, and Office365—is that they're closed source. Your data also exists at the whim of large corporations. I'm sure you've heard numerous stories of, say, Google locking or removing accounts without warning. If that happens to you, you lose what's yours. So what's an open source advocate who wants to work with web applications to do? You turn to an open source alternative, of course. Let's take a look at three of them. Read more

Hackable voice-controlled speaker and IoT controller hits KS

SeedStudio’s hackable, $49 and up “ReSpeaker” speaker system runs OpenWrt on a Mediatek MT7688 and offers voice control over home appliances. The ReSpeaker went live on Kickstarter today and has already reached 95 percent of its $40,000 funding goal with 29 days remaining. The device is billed by SeedStudio as an “open source, modular voice interface that allows us to hack things around us, just using our voices.” While it can be used as an Internet media player or a voice-activated IoT hub — especially when integrated with Seeed’s Wio Link IoT board — it’s designed to be paired with individual devices. For example, the campaign’s video shows the ReSpeaker being tucked inside a teddy bear or toy robot, or attached to plant, enabling voice control and voice synthesis. Yes, the plant actually asks to be watered. Read more

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