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Deus Ex: Mankind Divided On Linux With Latest RadeonSI - Up To 2~3x Faster

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Gaming

LINUX GAMING --
With Marek's latest set of RadeonSI Gallium3D patches, which are said to improve the Deus Ex: Mankind Divided performance by around 70%, having landed in Mesa Git, here are some fresh benchmarks with a Radeon RX 480 and R9 Fury.

The "before" results were from the Christmas-timed 31-Way NVIDIA GeForce / AMD Radeon Linux OpenGL Comparison - End-Of-Year 2016 and then the "new" results are using Linux 4.10 and Mesa 13.1-dev Git as of today. The RX 480 and R9 Fury were used for benchmarking.

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Games for GNU/Linux

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Gaming
  • The AMD Patches To Boost Deus Ex: Mankind Divided Have Landed In Mesa Git

    For those that have been looking forward to running Deus Ex: Mankind Divided on Linux with the RadeonSI Gallium3D driver, you'll want to fire up Mesa Git.

    The work covered previously about RadeonSI Patches Boost Deus Ex: MD Performance By ~70%, have now landed in Mesa Git. The SDMA changes to RadeonSI landed in Mesa Git yesterday, making room for much better performance with this newer Linux game port by Feral Interactive. But even a 70% improvement will likely still leave RadeonSI much slower than the NVIDIA Linux driver stack, so hopefully Marek has some more patches he's working on for better optimizing this demanding game.

  • Mesa git has pulled in the patches from Marek to improve Deus Ex: Mankind Divided on Linux

    It was 12 patches in total and all of them were reviewed and accepted into Mesa. You can follow the Mesa git log quite easily here.

  • My thoughts on the MMO Albion Online on Linux, many months later

    I’ve been playing Albion Online [Official Site] on and off since November 2015 and since then it has evolved into something much bigger.

    Note: Albion Online is in beta and it will have a player-wipe just before the final release. Only purchase it if you’re okay with that. The final wipe doesn’t have a specific date yet, other than “Q1 2017”.

Games for GNU/Linux and Steam Client

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Gaming
  • Intel’s Clear Linux to bring Steam integration for gaming

    Gaming on Linux was already taken to another level by SteamOS. But now Intel is all set to integrate Steam into its Clear Linux to make the existing gaming experience even better.

    Intel’s open source technology center has been working on Clear Linux distribution for a long time. The distribution is specifically designed to bring the best of Linux on Intel-powered hardware and targeted at workstation and server computing. However, apart from enabling enterprises with its open source offering, the chip maker has now started working on improving the Steam support.

    Clear Linux comes with the latest Mesa stack that has Vulkan drivers. Notably, the distribution offers accelerated graphics but currently lacks the support for dedicated graphics.

  • No More Room in Hell 2 has a new teaser, should come to Linux

    No More Room in Hell 2 [Official Site] is not just a sequel, it's going to be running on an entirely different game engine. The developer have said will be doing a Linux version, but their wording has been iffy.

  • The latest Steam Beta Client fixes a nearly 4 year old Linux issue, fixes other Linux issues

    Valve have been busy, as the latest Steam Beta Client makes some important improvements to the Linux client. The Steam Controller has also seen some improvements, like supporting configurations for XBox 360, Xbox One, and Generic X-Input controller configurator support.

  • Steam Linux Client Beta Adds Idle Detection, Updated Vulkan Loader & More

    Valve pushed out an updated Steam Linux client beta today that includes some useful changes for Linux gamers.

  • Valve Finally Makes Steam Work Out-of-the-Box with Open-Source Graphics Drivers

    Today, January 5, 2017, Valve's engineers working on Steam announced the availability of a new Beta build of the Steam Client, which appears to address a bunch of Linux bugs, as well as to add numerous Steam Controller improvements.

    The new Steam Client Beta update brings quite a lot of changes (see them all in the changelog attached at the end of the story), but we're very interested in the Linux ones, which appears to let Steam work out-of-the-box with open-source graphics drivers on various modern GNU/Linux distributions, while implementing a new setting for older ones to improve the interaction between Steam's runtime and system's host libraries.

Games for GNU/Linux

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Gaming

Games for GNU/Linux

Filed under
Gaming
  • Steam And Linux On PS4- Traces of AMD’s Bonaire GPU found

    In another attempt by hackers to run steam and Linux on PS4, it hit a dead end: they could not get the PS4’s GPU to display any sort of output or even process any kind of graphics. Much like any dead end, if you need a workaround you research the internet. So, the hackers did the same and found a chink in the armor of GPU script.

  • Steam’s Linux and OpenGL Efforts Forced Microsoft to Take PC Gaming Seriously: Former Valve Employee

    Ex-Valve employee Rich Geldreich — who worked on games such as Portal 2 and Linux versions of Valve’s games based on the original Source Engine — took to his blog to share the impact Valve’s efforts with Linux and OpenGL had on the industry. Particularly in getting Microsoft to support PC gaming better.

    One post on Valve’s Linux blog, entitled ‘Faster Zombies’ is of interest as it showed off what performance Valve was able to get out of its games running Linux and OpenGL, which was faster than using Windows with Direct3D on the same systems. Written by Gabe Newell himself, it resulted in Microsoft paying the company a visit.

  • Valve's Linux support 'lit a fire' under Microsoft execs, says ex-Valve engineer

    In the summer of 2013, Valve made a show of throwing support behind Linux by moving to port its game engine and Steam platform to run on the cult favorite operating system, generating a bit of cautious optimism among game devs.

    PC game makers may recall that Valve even launched its own Linux-focused blog, and shortly after launch it published a post outlining how the company had tweaked Left 4 Dead 2 to the point that it actually ran better on Linux using OpenGL than on Windows 7 using Direct3D. Now, years later, devs may be curious to hear that one of the primary engineers on that project believes it helped encourage Microsoft to bolster its support for Direct3D tech.

    Longtime game engineer Rich Geldreich (who currently works at Unity and occasionally blogs on Gamasutra) was working at Valve on the Steam Linux project in 2013, and this week he published a post to his personal blog reminiscing about what it was like to be there in the room with company chief Gabe Newell helping to write that Left 4 Dead 2 Linux performance post -- and how Valve's big push for Linux influenced the industry in some surprising ways.

  • Beamdog (Baldur's Gate: Enhanced Edition) are working on another game, testers needed

    It seems Beamdog may be doing a revamp of another title, or possibly even an original title. They have sent word that they need game testers, including Linux gamers.

Games for GNU/Linux

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Gaming
  • We have 99 keys of IMPOSSIBALL to give away to Linux gamers willing to test it out

    The developer of IMPOSSIBALL [Steam, Official Site] is working to bring the game to Linux, so they have sent us tons of keys to throw at you so you can test it.

    The developer isn't too familiar with Linux just yet, so they are bringing you all in to help polish it up.

    The beta is open to anyone who already owns it, otherwise you can claim your key below!

  • Eco - Global Survival Game, an incredibly interesting looking game that's already on Linux

    I was pointed towards 'Eco - Global Survival Game' [Steam, Official Site] thanks to a GOL follower and after looking it up, I decided to check it out a little more closely.

    The game was funded thanks to Kickstarter, where it bagged $202,760 towards helping development.

    The good news is that it's already on Linux. I read reports that early Alpha versions are already up to date for Linux, so I picked up a copy to test it out. I am pleased to personally confirm that it does have a Linux version already.

    I jumped right in on the only server that appeared to be compatible and I was genuinely surprised. The people on it welcomed me and pointed me to the starter guide right away. It's so damn refreshing to be greeted by friendly people in an online game!

    The game is really quite good-looking in a simple way. They've gone for a more cartoon-like visual style than realism, which is done really well. People have compared it to Minecraft, but it's not "blocky" at all. The gameplay is also vastly different, since you have skills, a social system and so on.

  • Retro-Pixel Castles updated again and will get a new name
  • Rich Geldreich, a former Valve developer, has an interesting blog post about Valve supporting Linux and OpenGL

    I fondly remember reading the Valve blog post about getting Left 4 Dead 2 running faster on Linux than it did on Windows. I remember feeling so happy about everything that was happening. Rich Geldreich was the one feeding the information to Gabe Newell himself (the owner of Valve) who wrote the blog post.

  • The "Faster Zombies!" blog post

    Gabe Newell himself wrote a lot of this post in front of me. From what I could tell, he seemed flabbergasted and annoyed that the team didn't immediately blog this info once we were solidly running faster in OpenGL vs. D3D. (Of course we should have blogged it ourselves! One of our missions as a team inside of Valve was to build a supportive community around our efforts.) From his perspective, it was big news that we were running faster on Linux vs. Windows. I personally suspect his social network didn't believe it was possible, and/or there was some deeper strategic business reason for blogging this info ASAP.

  • Steam's Linux Efforts Were Influential To Microsoft, Other Companies

MAME 0.181 Open-Source Arcade Machine Emulator to Support Sega's Altered Beast

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OSS
Gaming

A new maintenance update of the open-source and multiplatform MAME (Multiple Arcade Machine Emulator) computer emulator tool landed to kick off 2017, with even more improvements and support for lots of arcade games.

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Games for GNU/Linux

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Gaming

Fail0verflow Demos Linux & Steam Running on PlayStation 4 Firmware 4.05 at 33C3

Filed under
Linux
Gaming

2016 ended in big style for hackers and security researchers from all over the world, who gathered together at the well-known Chaos Communication Congress (33c3) annual event organized by the Chaos Computer Club (CCC) of Germany

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Games for GNU/Linux

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Gaming
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Android Leftovers

Google's Upspin Debuts

  • Another option for file sharing
    Existing mechanisms for file sharing are so fragmented that people waste time on multi-step copying and repackaging. With the new project Upspin, we aim to improve the situation by providing a global name space to name all your files. Given an Upspin name, a file can be shared securely, copied efficiently without "download" and "upload", and accessed by anyone with permission from anywhere with a network connection.
  • Google Developing "Upspin" Framework For Naming/Sharing Files
    Google today announced an experimental project called Upspin that's aiming for next-generation file-sharing in a secure manner.
  • Google releases open source file sharing project 'Upspin' on GitHub
    Believe it or not, in 2017, file-sharing between individuals is not a particularly easy affair. Quite frankly, I had a better experience more than a decade ago sending things to friends and family using AOL Instant Messenger. Nowadays, everything is so fragmented, that it can be hard to share. Today, Google unveils yet another way to share files. Called "Upspin," the open source project aims to make sharing easier for home users. With that said, the project does not seem particularly easy to set up or maintain. For example, it uses Unix-like directories and email addresses for permissions. While it may make sense to Google engineers, I am dubious that it will ever be widely used.
  • Google devs try to create new global namespace
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