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Gaming

Beta SteamOS ISO now available for testing

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Gaming

I just posted a SteamOS ISO that can be used to install SteamOS on non-UEFI systems. Thanks to directhex and ecliptik for their work on Ye Olde SteamOSe - this incorporates many of their changes. Dual-boot and custom partitioning are now possible from the "Expert Install" option.

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Leftovers: Gaming

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Gaming

7 Best Ubuntu Games

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Linux
Gaming

What we’ve prepared today is a compilation of best Ubuntu games. We’ve already shown you some of the finest titles available for Mac and Windows and now, it’s time to give the Linux distro in question some love. From casual releases to titles offering intensive gameplay, this roster places itself as an essential set of games you should own. Expect to find a lot of popular names from well-known developers on this list.

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Is 2014 the year you play with the penguin?

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Linux
Gaming

If you've never tried Linux or are looking for a new distro to try then check out Linux.com's top 7 distro list for 2014. If beauty is what you seek then Bodhi is a good choice as it has modified the Enlightenment window manager into something a little more manageable. For Ubuntu users there are two variants you could try, Xubuntu for desktops and Lubuntu for older less powerful laptops. For the security conscious there is TAILS, which automatically routes traffic through TOR and constantly deletes any tracking info from local storage as well as being specifically designed to run from a bootable USB drive. For the geeky parents out there, or for those looking for a very simple to understand distro is DouDou. It comes preloaded with an array of childrens learning software and Dan's Guardian to somewhat limit internet sites of a nature unsuited for the very young.

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Leftovers: Games

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Linux
Gaming

Valve Updates SteamOS With CPU/GPU Optimizations

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Gaming

SteamOS 01/13/2014 has fixes for multiple issues reported by users on GitHub. The latest SteamOS also merges in various Debian Wheezy bug-fixes for a handful of packages. UInput is also now built into the kernel directly rather than as a module and it's accessible via the Steam user. One of the more important bug-fixes is to address two cursors appearing on the screen when a game was exiting.

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Leftovers: Gaming

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Linux
Gaming

Huawei Unveils Android-Based Tron Game Console

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Linux
Gaming

Huawei is set to enter the console wars with its own Android-based mini-console. The Chinese company unveiled the "Tron" this week at the Consumer Electronics Show and it could hit the market in May for a mere $120 or less.

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Leftovers: Games

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Linux
Gaming

An Update & Upgrade to Unit 00

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Gaming

Finally, SteamOS is not preinstalled. We’re going to walk you through downloading SteamOS and setting it up on that second hard drive. We recognize some developers will prefer to install a traditional Linux installation, as recommended to Steam developers currently.

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More in Tux Machines

Raspberry Pi/Devices

  • Another new Raspbian release
  • How do geeks control their lights?
    We made this setup to test our capabilities to control Arduino with Raspberry Pi in our upcoming big project. We did not have spare keyboard and screen for RPi, so we ended up ssh-ing into the Pi via Wi-Fi router.
  • How To Start A Pirate FM Radio Station Using Your Raspberry Pi
    Continuing our Raspberry DIY series, we are here with a simple tutorial that tells you how to start your own pirate FM station using Raspberry Pi. Take a look and broadcast your tunes — anytime, anywhere.
  • Tizen 3.0 on the Raspberry Pi 2
    The Samsung Open Source Group is currently in the process of porting Tizen 3.0 to the Raspberry Pi 2 (RPi2). Our goal is to create a device capable of running a fully-functional Tizen 3.0 operating system, and we chose the RPi2 because it is the most popular single-board computer with more than 5 million sold. There are numerous Linux Distributions that run on the RPi2 including Raspbian, Pidora, Ubuntu, OSMC, and OpenElec , and we will add Tizen to this lineup. We face a number of obstacles in accomplishing this, but we hope this will serve as a model for bringing Tizen to a broader range of hardware platforms.
  • Embedded 14nm Atom x5-E8000 debuts on Congatec boards
    Intel released several new 14nm Atom SoCs, including an embedded, quad-core x5-E8000 part with 5W TDP, now available in four Congatec boards. Intel released the Atom x5-E8000, the first truly embedded system-on-chip using its 14nm Airmont architecture. Airmont is also the design that fuels Intel’s Celeron N3000 “Braswell” SoCs and its mobile-focused Atom x5 and x7 Z8000 “Cherry Trail” SoCs. The x5-E8000 is the heir to the 22nm Bay Trail generation Atom E3800 family.

Android Leftovers

FSF/GNU/GPL/FSFE

  • Winning the copyleft fight
    Bradley Kuhn started off his linux.conf.au 2016 talk by stating a goal that, he hoped, he shared with the audience: a world where more (or most) software is free software. The community has one key strategy toward that goal: copyleft licensing. He was there to talk about whether that strategy is working, and what can be done to make it more effective; the picture he painted was not entirely rosy, but there is hope if software developers are willing to make some changes. Copyleft licensing is still an effective strategy, he said; that can be seen because we've had the chance to run a real-world parallel experiment — an opportunity that doesn't come often. A lot of non-copyleft software has been written over the years; if proprietary forks of that software don't exist, then it seems clear that there is no need for copyleft; we just have to look to see whether proprietary versions of non-copyleft software exist. But, he said, he has yet to find a non-trivial non-copyleft program that lacks proprietary forks; without copyleft, companies will indeed take free software and make it proprietary.
  • The Trouble With the TPP, Day 27: Source Code Disclosure Confusion
    Another Trouble with the TPP is its foray into the software industry. One of the more surprising provisions in the TPP’s e-commerce chapter was the inclusion of a restriction on mandated source code disclosure. Article 14.17 states: No Party shall require the transfer of, or access to, source code of software owned by a person of another Party, as a condition for the import, distribution, sale or use of such software, or of products containing such software, in its territory.
  • I love Free Software Day 2016
    In the Free Software society we exchange a lot of criticism. We write bug reports, tell others how they can improve the software, ask them for new features, and generally are not shy about criticising others. There is nothing wrong about that. It helps us to constantly improve. But sometimes we forget to show the hardworking people behind the software our appreciation. We should not underestimate the power of a simple "thank you" to motivate Free Software contributors in their important work for society. The 14th of February (a Sunday this year) is the ideal day to do that.

Development News

  • Why I am not touching node.js [Ed: from Ferrari]
    Dear node.js/node-webkit people, what's the matter with you? I wanted to try out some stuff that requires node-webkit. So I try to use npm to download, build and install it, like CPAN would do. But then I see that the nodewebkit package is just a stub that downloads a 37MB file (using HTTP without TLS) containing pre-compiled binaries. Are you guys out of your minds? This is enough for me to never again get close to node.js and friends. I had already heard some awful stories, but this is just insane.
  • The next Generation of Code Hosting Platforms
    The last few weeks there has been a lot of rumors about GitHub. GitHub is a code hosting platform which tries to make it as easy as possible to develop software and collaborate with people. The main achievement from GitHub is probably to moved the social part of software development to a complete new level. As more and more Free Software initiatives started using GitHub it became really easy to contribute a bug fix or a new feature to the 3rd party library or application you use. With a few clicks you can create a fork, add your changes and send them back to the original project as a pull request. You don’t need to create a new account, don’t need to learn the tools used by the project, etc. Everybody is on the same platform and you can contribute immediately. In many cases this improves the collaboration between projects a lot. Also the ability to mention the developer of other projects easily in your pull request or issue improved the social interactions between developers and makes collaboration across different projects the default.
  • Choose GitLab for your next open source project
    GitLab.com is a competitor of GIthub. It’s a service provider for git-based source code repositories that offers much more than it’s bigger brother. In this post I will try to convince you to try it out for your next project. GitLab is not only a simple git hosting; its features impact the whole development process, the way of contributing to a project, executing and running tests, protecting source code from changes, more and more.