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Leftovers: Gaming

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Gaming

SteamOS Beta 126 Better Handles XBMC

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Software
Gaming

Valve has pushed another update out to SteamOS, with this time around there being benefits to fans of the XBMC multimedia software.

SteamOS Update 126 was pushed out to Alchemist Beta and it incorporates additional packages needed into the SteamOS archive for running XBMC media software. There's also compositor fixes and various package updates to handle security issues.

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3D Engine for Linux UNIGINE Now Features a Complex City Traffic System

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GNU
Linux
Gaming

UNIGINE, a real-time 3D engine built to run on all major platforms, including Linux, has been updated again and its developers have implemented numerous features, including a comprehensive City Traffic System.

The UNIGINE Engine is built by Unigine Corp., the company behind the Heaven DX11 Benchmark software. The technology they develop is getting better all the time and the updates for the engine always bring numerous improvements...

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Leftovers: Gaming

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Gaming

Linux will not become a gaming platform, it already is one

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Linux
Gaming

The true measure of any great gaming platform is not the number of games available. Nor is it the need to have the same games as other competing platforms (the Playstation 4 doesn't need Mario games to be considered successful). And it really isn't even about how many total games are sold, though that certainly helps.

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Nostalgic Gaming On Linux With Good Old Games

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GNU
Linux
Gaming

Thanks to the recent Linux support provided by DRM-free classic games provider, GOG.com, getting that nostalgic kick on Linux has never been easier. In this article I'll also detail a few of my favourite classic games that are now available to play in Linux.

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Leftovers: Gaming

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Gaming

Steam OS review – from a Linux user’s point of view

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GNU
Linux
Debian
Gaming

Steam OS images were made available for free download yesterday. I grabbed the images, created an ISO and booted a high-end system on it (it was a working Windows 8 desktop). Instead of automated install, I chose advanced install so I could see what was going on. It was a pure Debian installer experience.

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5 Upcoming Linux Games You Should Be Excited About

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Linux
Gaming

Steam's release followed by the announcement of Steam OS was an unexpected boon for the slow growth of gaming on Linux. Both the developments were major milestones when it comes to Linux's recognition as a commercially viable gaming platform. Be it Left 4 Dead or Portal, Linux is no longer the operating system for nerds. It has truly gone mainstream.

Steam is now on the Ubuntu Software Center and more and more games being added to the catalog every week. As good as it sounds, only a few AAA titles are being released on Linux. This means that if you are a Call of Duty, Assassins Creed, or a Battlefield lover, Linux isn't ready yet for turning your PC into a full-blown gaming machine. But don't worry; there are signs that this might change. In fact, there are some upcoming games that might actually make you excited about building a new Linux-based gaming rig. So, without much ado, here are 5 exciting games soon to be available for Linux.

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Leftovers: Gaming

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Gaming
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University fuels NextCloud's improved monitoring

Encouraged by a potential customer - a large, German university - the German start-up company NextCloud has improved the resource monitoring capabilities of its eponymous cloud services solution, which it makes available as open source software. The improved monitoring should help users scale their implementation, decide how to balance work loads and alerting them to potential capacity issues. NextCloud’s monitoring capabilities can easily be combined with OpenNMS, an open source network monitoring and management solution. Read more

Linux Kernel Developers on 25 Years of Linux

One of the key accomplishments of Linux over the past 25 years has been the “professionalization” of open source. What started as a small passion project for creator Linus Torvalds in 1991, now runs most of modern society -- creating billions of dollars in economic value and bringing companies from diverse industries across the world to work on the technology together. Hundreds of companies employ thousands of developers to contribute code to the Linux kernel. It’s a common codebase that they have built diverse products and businesses on and that they therefore have a vested interest in maintaining and improving over the long term. The legacy of Linux, in other words, is a whole new way of doing business that’s based on collaboration, said Jim Zemlin, Executive Director of The Linux Foundation said this week in his keynote at LinuxCon in Toronto. Read more

Car manufacturers cooperate to build the car of the future

Automotive Grade Linux (AGL) is a project of the Linux Foundation dedicated to creating open source software solutions for the automobile industry. It also leverages the ten billion dollar investment in the Linux kernel. The work of the AGL project enables software developers to keep pace with the demands of customers and manufacturers in this rapidly changing space, while encouraging collaboration. Walt Miner is the community manager for Automotive Grade Linux, and he spoke at LinuxCon in Toronto recently on how Automotive Grade Linux is changing the way automotive manufacturers develop software. He worked for Motorola Automotive, Continental Automotive, and Montevista Automotive program, and saw lots of original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) like Ford, Honda, Jaguar Land Rover, Mazda, Mitsubishi, Nissan, Subaru and Toyota in action over the years. Read more

Torvalds at LinuxCon: The Highlights and the Lowlights

On Wednesday, when Linus Torvalds was interviewed as the opening keynote of the day at LinuxCon 2016, Linux was a day short of its 25th birthday. Interviewer Dirk Hohndel of VMware pointed out that in the famous announcement of the operating system posted by Torvalds 25 years earlier, he had said that the OS “wasn’t portable,” yet today it supports more hardware architectures than any other operating system. Torvalds also wrote, “it probably never will support anything other than AT-harddisks.” Read more