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Gaming

Linux gaming

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GNU
Linux
Gaming

Back in 2006, when I was contemplating a move from Windows to Linux, I knew I would have to give up computer games. This wasn’t because there were no games written for Linux, it’s just that they weren’t very good. Most of the best commercial games were (and still are) written for Windows, but that’s been changing dramatically over the last year, thanks to Steam, the Internet-based software distribution platform from Valve Corp.

The move to support Linux came fairly late but is drawing impetus from the top.

In July 2012, Valve managing director Gabe Newell had complained that Windows 8 was “a catastrophe for everyone in the PC space.”

Observing that many people still stayed away from Linux because of a lack of games, he said Valve was working to bring Steam titles to Linux as a hedging strategy.

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today's leftovers

Filed under
Software
Gaming

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming

Leftovers: Games

Filed under
Gaming

25 great Linux games available dirt cheap during Steam's Summer Sale

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GNU
Linux
Gaming

The Steam Summer Sale is here, and Lord GabeN and his minions are tossing out deep, deep discounts on games left and right. There are flash sales and hidden gems galore, but alas: Only a small proportion Steam's catalog includes Linux support. What's an open-source aficionado to do?

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FlightGear 3.0 Is the Most Advanced Simulator on Linux and It's Completely Free

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Gaming

FlightGear 3.0, an open source flight simulator that supports a variety of popular platforms and is developed by skilled volunteers from around the world, is available for download.

FlightGear aims to create a sophisticated and open flight simulator framework for use in research or academic environments, pilot training, or as an industry engineering tool. This is probably the only simulation of its kind on the Linux platform, especially in terms of complexity...

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Leftovers: Gaming

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Gaming

Super Pi Brothers

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Gaming

I don't game as much as I used to. Although I've certainly spent countless hours of my life in front of a Nintendo, SNES, or after that, playing a first-person shooter on my computer (Linux only, thank you), these days, my free time tends to go toward one of the many nongaming hobbies I've accumulated. Recently though, I found myself dusting off my Wii console just so I could play an NES and SNES game I re-purchased for it. The thing is, those games require using a somewhat strange controller, and I already have a modified SNES controller that can connect over USB. That was enough to encourage me to search for a better solution. Of course, I simply could connect three or four consoles and stack up games in my living room, but I've grown accustomed to ripping my CDs and DVDs and picking what I want to listen to or watch from a central media center. It would be nice if I didn't have to get up and find a cartridge every time I wanted to switch games. This, of course, means going with emulation, but although in the past I'd had success with a modified classic Xbox, I didn't have that hardware anymore. I figured someone must have gotten this set up on the Raspberry Pi, and sure enough, after a brief search and a few commands, I had a perfect retro-gaming arcade set up on a spare Raspberry Pi.

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Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming
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today's leftovers

US Military To Launch Open Source Academy

Open source software, which has become increasingly common throughout the US military from unmanned drones to desktops, has now been enlisted as a career option for military personnel. In September, Camp Shelby Joint Forces Training Center will open a Linux certification academy, marking the first time such a training program has been hosted on a military base. Read more

Video: TedX talk - Richard Stallman

Well, vp9/opus in a webm container have been supported by both Firefox and Google Chrome for several releases now... so enjoy it in your web browser. Read more

Eclipse Luna for Fedora 20

If you are a Fedora Eclipse user, then you're probably saddened since the release of Eclipse Luna (4.4) because you are still using Eclipse Kepler (4.3) on Fedora 20. Well, be saddened no longer because Eclipse Luna is now available for Fedora 20 as a software collection! A software collection is simply a set of RPMs whose contents are isolated from the rest of your system such that they do not modify, overwrite or otherwise conflict with anything in the main Fedora repositories. This allows you install multiple versions of a software stack side-by-side, without them interfering with one another. More can be read about this mechanism on the software collections website. The Eclipse Luna software collection lives in a separate yum repository, which must be configured by clicking on this link to install the release package. Read more