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Gaming

Games for GNU/Linux

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Gaming

Games for GNU/Linux

Filed under
Gaming

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming

Games for GNU/Linux

Filed under
Gaming

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming

Dear Valve and Steam Machines OEMs, you have it all wrong

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Gaming

Most of us reading this site want Steam Machines to do well. Not all of us will be interested in buying the hardware, but we're aware that its success is also tied to the success of Linux as a gaming platform, which is why I'm pretty miffed that the OEMs and Valve have messed it up.

Valve have done well with the controller and with making SteamOS pretty coherent and user-friendly, but messed it up when it came to defining what a Steam Machine actually is, leaving it open to interpretation. I've said this time and time again, but the original Steam Machines line-up was a complete mess. We had everything from $1500 PCs to ludicrously overpriced machines which didn't even have discreet graphics cards.

Even the best offerings fall short. Alienware's cheapest offering comes in at $450 (this should be the ideal price point in my opinion), but offers a mere 4GB RAM. If you want to scale this up to 8GB, you have to pay $750 since it also means upping the CPU to an i5. Does a GTX 960 need an i5 to do its thing? No, not really. You might get a few extra frames or do better in a more CPU-intensive game, but if one tries to step outside the worldview of a PC gamer and into one of a console gamer, then it doesn't take long to realise that those $200 aren't worth it, but $20 for an extra stick of 4GB RAM would be worth it.

Read more

Games: Cold Beam, Unvanquished, Vendetta Online

Filed under
Gaming

Leftovers: Gaming and Graphics

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Gaming
  • Trying The Radeon RX 480 & R9 Fury With The AMDGPU Code For Linux 4.8

    With the main batch of Radeon/AMDGPU driver changes ready for DRM-Next that will in turn land for the Linux 4.8 kernel, I've begun testing this new code with various AMD GPUs. Here are my AMDGPU results when comparing Linux 4.7 Git to this code that's coming for Linux 4.8 with a Radeon R9 Fury and RX 480.

    Yesterday I built a fresh Ubuntu kernel of this new drm-next-4.8 Radeon/AMDGPU material merged back atop its Linux 4.7 drm-fixes code. This was pointed out by Alex in the forums due to not all of the drm-fixes being mainlined yet for the RX 480. If you are interested in trying out this Linux 4.7 drm-fixes + drm-next-4.8 kernel for Radeon/AMDGPU, you can find it on Phoronix.net: linux-image-4.7.0-rc5-4.8-next-plus-fixes_4.7.0-rc5-4.8-next-plus-fixes-1_amd64.deb.

  • Mesa 12 released, Vulkan for Intel, OpenGL 4.3 and more for open source graphics users

    Wow, Mesa 12 has officially been released and it's a huge release for them! Intel now supports Vulkan, their OpenGL is up to 4.3 and more.

  • Starbound to finally leave Early Access on July 22nd

    After a number of years in development Starbound is finally about to get a full release and I can't wait to play it in full!

    We actually ran a server for it a long while ago, so would you guys be interested if we ran a Linux gamer server again? If enough people are interested I will do it for sure as it will be nice to play it with others.

  • Have you seen Black Ice? A really rather cool hack and shoot FPS with Linux & SteamOS support

    Black Ice is a game I have followed for a long time (and personally purchased a copy) and it just released a rather nice update. If you're an FPS fan and looking for something to sink some time into, this could be what you need.

    It's rather different to any other FPS I've played before, as you go around hacking into different buildings with assorted difficulty levels, and from the hack a bunch of enemies spawn.

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  • Low-cost embeddable SDR occupies a mini-PCIe card
    The Fairwaves “XTRX” mini-PCIe SDR card is a low-cost embeddable SDR card aimed at high data rate apps including 4G/5G and “massive” MIMO. Fairwaves Inc.’s “XTRX” SDR mini-PCIe card, which launched on Nov. 30 at Crowd Supply, has earned more than 80 percent of its funding goal with one month remaining. The company claims the full sized mini-PCIe XTRX card (30 x 51mm) is the smallest commercially available SDR card. For comparison, the USB-interfaced LimeSDR Mini and RTL-SDR boards measure 69 x 31.4mm and 40 x 60mm, respectively.
  • Tiny quad-core Linux SBCs slim down and get an RPi-like carrier
    FriendlyElec has unveiled COM-like variants of its tiny, low-cost quad-core, Allwinner H3- and H5-based NanoPi Neo and Neo2 SBCs, plus an RPi style carrier. FriendlyElec’s new $8 “NanoPi Neo Core” and $25 “NanoPi Neo Core2” boards are low-profile variants of the company’s earlier 40 x 40mm NanoPi Neo and NanoPi Neo 2 SBCs, but with their large, topside USB and Ethernet connectors replaced by a third dual-row pin header. As a result, the new boards are more like computer-on-modules (COMs) than single-board computers (SBCs), in that they’re meant to be combined with off-the-shelf or custom carrier boards, such as FriendlyElec’s RPi 3-like Mini Shield (see farther below). [...] Operating system — Ubuntu Core; Armbian; U-boot bootloader
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