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Gaming

Gamestop Bringing Game Streaming Linux

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Gaming

gaygamer.net: Joystiq is reporting that Gamestop is hiring (an encouraging sign in this era of developer layoffs) talent not only to bring its cloud gaming service to Android, but to Linux-based platforms as well.

Linux users willing to pay more for the Humble Frozenbyte Bundle than others

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Gaming

opensource.com: On April 12 the Humble Frozenbyte Bundle of games went up for sale--for whatever price you want, and it's all DRM-free. As of this morning, the average Linux user was paying the most at $11.68, while the average Windows user was paying the least at $4.02.

Vertigo Beta

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Gaming

gamingonlinux.info: Vertigo is an arcade game that is completely free, open-source and cross-platform. I built it using Ogre and BulletPhysics. For Linux, I tested on the following distributions: Ubuntu 10.04, 10.10 and Debian Lenny.

Introducing The R5 Game Engine

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Gaming

phoronix.com: But there are many other open-source game engines out there too, including a new one that's just recently come about: r5ge, short for the R5 Game Engine.

Open source gaming – or things I do when I should be working

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Gaming

h-online.com: For some users computer games are little more than "the things I do when I should be working", a soothing distraction or a waste of time and space. For others games are a matter of life and death, the bane of partners, the be all and end all of computing, and the reason why we bother.

Frozenbyte releases Shadowgrounds source code

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Gaming
  • Frozenbyte releases Shadowgrounds source code
  • Humble Indie Bundle's Source Releases

Yes, There Are Portal 2 Linux References

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Gaming
  • Yes, There Are Portal 2 Linux References
  • Portal 2 Review
  • Helena The 3rd Update

Top 5 Paid Games for Linux

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Gaming

junauza.com: With Linux matching Windows and Mac head-to-head in almost every field, indie developers are ensuring that gaming on Linux doesn't get left behind. Here's a look at the top 5 paid games that are making noise:

Angry Birds Angry with Linux?

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Linux
Gaming

jeffhoogland.blogspot: Something that really irks me however is when a company creates a game in OpenGL (See Blizzard and Valve) to run on Mac OSX, but at the same time refuses to support the Linux operating system. Angry Birds works on iOS, Maemo, Android, and Windows - yet they refuse to make a general Linux installer.

Interview with Michael Bok, developer of The Zod Engine

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Interviews
Gaming

gamingonlinux.info: Today I had the pleasure of chatting with Michael Bok of The Zod Engine via google talk. This is the most fun I've had chatting to developer so far.

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