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Gaming

Games: Opus Magnum, Killing Floor 2, Where The Water Tastes Like Wine

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Gaming
  • Opus Magnum is an exceptional puzzle game available for Linux

    I decided to bite the bullet and actually pick up a personal copy of Opus Magnum [Steam, Humble Store], I’m glad I did and it's fantastic.

    At first, it’s a little bit like there’s a tiny man inside your brain just shouting “AHH!” as there’s quite a lot to take in, but once you push through the initial brain overload it’s a brilliant experience. I wouldn’t say I was generally a huge puzzle game fan, but Opus Magnum absolutely fascinates me in ways I didn’t think possible.

  • Killing Floor 2 for Linux is 'indefinitely on hold' as they can't find a developer

    Sad news, as it seems there's just no chance of Killing Floor 2 coming to Linux any more as Tripwire can't find a developer.

    Going back to February of last year, Knockout Games sneaked out before that they were working on it, but not all contracts work out of course. I assumed they had parted ways, since later in August of last year Tripwire then said it wasn't in active development. I was hoping Knockout Games (or anyone) was just quietly working on it, but I guess not.

  • Where The Water Tastes Like Wine has a new trailer, musician Sting to star in it

    Where The Water Tastes Like Wine [Steam, Official Site] is an upcoming adventure game from Dim Bulb Games and Serenity Forge has a new trailer to show off some characters, the fun news is that the musician Sting is starring in it.

    Gordon Matthew Thomas Sumner, better know by his stage name of Sting is starring is this new adventure game along side some great actors like: Dave Fennoy (The Walking Dead: A Telltale Games Series), Cissy Jones (Firewatch), Kimberly Brooks (Mass Effect) and many more.

NVIDIA GeForce vs. AMD Radeon Linux Gaming Performance At The Start Of 2018

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Gaming

Here is a fresh look at the NVIDIA GeForce and AMD Radeon Linux graphics card performance as we start 2018. Testing was done using the latest Linux 4.15 Git kernel -- including the KPTI page table isolation support -- as well as using the newest Mesa 17.4-dev driver code for RadeonSI/RADV and on the NVIDIA side is their brand new 390.12 beta driver.

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Games on GNU/Linux

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Gaming

Software and Games: TEA Ebook, Akiee, KDE Discover Software Center and More

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Software
Gaming
  • TEA Ebook – A Modern Ebook App for Stylish Readers

    We have reviewed a good number of ebook apps in the past, most of which have been in development for a long time. Today, we bring you a relatively new app to the application market and it goes by the name of TEA Ebook.

    TEA Ebook is a free and cross-platform EPUB and PDF reader with which you can browse and read through your entire digital library wherever you are, and without an internet connection.

  • Akiee – A Markdown-Based Task Manager for Developers

    Akiee is a cross-platform, AGILE-inspired task manager that helps you to concentrate on your most important tasks by making use of ranks instead of priorities.

    It features a simple UI with three main tabs, Todo, Doing, and Done. A "+" button for adding new tasks, an “Editor” button for editing tasks directly, and an “All” button to list all your tasks.

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  • Discover, the KDE Software Center App, is Improving Nicely

    Many KDE fans –maybe even you– consider the app to be too limited, preferring instead to use an alternative tool like Synaptic or the Muon Software Center to handle package management.

    So popular is Muon that Kubuntu 17.10 even re-added it to its install image!

    But Discover shouldn’t be forgotten about.

    It’s important that Plasma desktop has a vibrant, easy to use, “one-stop-shop” for users to discover, install, update and remove software on their desktops.

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  • Polishing Discover Software Center

    KDE Discover Software Center is a key element of our Usability and Productivity initiative because it encompasses the basic experience of discovering, installing, and removing software. Most regular people don’t want to use the command line to do this, and for them, we have Discover.

  • Breaking apart massive bosses in the Breakout-like 'Puppet Kings', some thoughts

    I have fond memories of Breakout as a child, my son even has a rather low quality version on his 'kids camera' and Puppet Kings [Steam] is an interesting take on it.

  • Need to relax? Guppy is a simple game about trying to survive as a fish

    Since releases are always light at the start of a year, I've been able to look over some more titles sent to our Steam Curator. Guppy [Steam, Official Site] is one such game, that sees you become a fish.

Games: GOG, The Station, EVERSPACE, Turnover

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Gaming

How to set up a Raspberry Pi for retro gaming

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Gaming
HowTos

I grew up with console gaming and over the years I have had a number of systems, including Atari, SNES, Sega Genesis, and my all-time-favorite—the Commodore Amiga. I recently found a backup of old games I have been carrying around with me for years and got nostalgic for the glory days of retro gaming. I grabbed some old hardware and started tinkering with it so I could relive my childhood. I was surprised how well these games run on my Raspberry Pi and it's become something of a new hobby.

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Games: Boson, Descenders, Warhammer 40,000: Dawn of War III

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Gaming
  • Forgotten FOSS Games: Boson

    Back in September of 1999, just about a year after the KDE project had shipped its first release ever, Thomas Capricelli announced “our attempt to make a Real Time Strategy game (RTS) for the KDE project” on the kde-announce mailing list. Boson 0.1, as the attempt was called, was based on Qt 1.4, the KDE 1.x libraries, and described as being “Warcraft-like”.

    Development continued at a fast pace over the following year. 3D artists and sound designers were invited to contribute, and basic game play (e.g. collecting oil and minerals) started working. The core engine gained much-needed features. A map editor was already part of the package. Four releases later, on October 30, 2000, the release of version 0.5 was celebrated as a major milestone, also because Boson had been ported to Qt 2.2.1 & KDE 2.0 to match the development of the projects it was based on. Then the project suddenly went into hiatus, as it happens so often with ambitious open source game projects. A new set of developers revived Boson one year later, in 2001, and decided to port the game to Qt 3, the KDE 3 libraries and the recently introduced libkdegames library.

  • Descenders is an extreme downhill biking game is coming to Linux

    Although it may not list it on the Steam store page, the developer of Descenders [Steam, Official Site], an extreme downhill biking game has confirmed it will be released for Linux.

  • Feral has patched Warhammer 40,000: Dawn of War III for Linux to fix Vulkan on NVIDIA 384

    For those who noticed Warhammer 40,000: Dawn of War III [Steam] was a bit broken on the NVIDIA 384 driver series, Feral has now fixed it.

5 arcade-style games for Linux

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Linux
Gaming

Gaming has traditionally been one of Linux's weak points. That has changed somewhat in recent years thanks to Steam, GOG, and other efforts to bring commercial games to multiple operating systems, but those games often are not open source. Sure, the games can be played on an open source operating system, but that is not good enough for an open source purist.

So, can someone who uses only free and open source software find games that are polished enough to present a solid gaming experience without compromising their open source ideals? Absolutely! While most open source games are unlikely to rival some of the AAA commercial games developed with massive budgets, there are plenty of open source games, in many genres, that are fun to play and can be installed from the repositories of most major Linux distributions.

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Games: Steam, SuperTux and More

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Gaming
  • Turns out Linux market share on Steam did not go back up in December

    Originally, the December market share for Linux on Steam was shown as 0.43%, but Valve have revised this down to 0.26%. So that's a decrease of 0.01 percentage points from November to December.

  • SuperTux: A Linux Take on Super Mario Game

    When people usually think of PC games, they think of big titles, like Call of Duty, which often cost millions of dollars to create. While those games may be enjoyable, there are many games created by amateur programmers that are just as fun.

    I am going to review one such game that I love to play. It’s called SuperTux.

  • PhysicS cheats

    I guess the goofiest stuff in basic game physics is really just about mapping player controls to in-game actions like jumping and deceleration; the rest consists of hacks to compensate for representing everything as a box.

Games: Wine 3.0 RC5, Super Indie Kart and More

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Gaming
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Bang & Olufsen’s RPi add-on brings digital life to old speakers

B&O and HiFiBerry have launched an open source, DIY “Beocreate 4” add-on for the Raspberry Pi that turns vintage speakers into digitally amplified, wireless-enabled smart speakers with the help of a 180-Watt 4-channel amplifier, a DSP, and a DAC. Bang & Olufsen has collaborated with HiFiBerry to create the open source, $189 Beocreate 4 channel amplifier kit. The 180 x 140 x 30mm DSP/DAC/amplifier board pairs with your BYO Raspberry Pi 3 with a goal of upcycling vintage passive speakers. Read more

Gemini PDA will ship with Android, but it also supports Debian, Ubuntu, Sailfish, and Postmarket OS (crowdfunding, work in progress)

The makers of the Gemini PDA plan to begin shipping the first units of their handheld computer to their crowdfunding campaign backers any day now. And while the folks at Planet Computer have been calling the Gemini PDA a dual OS device (with Android and Linux support) from the get go, it turns out the first units will actually just ship with Android. Read more

Red Hat: CO.LAB, Kubernetes/OpenShift, Self-Serving 'Study' and More

Browsers: Mozilla and Iridium

  • Best Web Browser
    When the Firefox team released Quantum in November 2017, they boasted it was "over twice as fast as Firefox from 6 months ago", and Linux Journal readers generally agreed, going as far as to name it their favorite web browser. A direct response to Google Chrome, Firefox Quantum also boasts decreased RAM usage and a more streamlined user interface.
  • Share Exactly What You See On-Screen With Firefox Screenshots
    A “screenshot” is created when you capture what’s on your computer screen, so you can save it as a reference, put it in a document, or send it as an image file for others to see exactly what you see.
  • What Happens when you Contribute, revisited
    I sat down to write a post about my students' experiences this term contributing to open source, and apparently I've written this before (and almost exactly a year ago to the day!) The thing about teaching is that it's cyclic, so you'll have to forgive me as I give a similar lecture here today. I'm teaching two classes on open source development right now, two sections in an introductory course, and another two in a follow-up intermediate course. The students are just starting to get some releases submitted, and I've been going through their blogs, pull requests, videos (apparently this generation likes making videos, which is something new for me), tweets, and the like. I learn a lot from my students, and I wanted to share some of what I'm seeing.
  • Iridium Browser: A Browser for the Privacy Conscience
    Iridium is a web browser based on Chromium project. It has been customized to not share your data and thus keeping your privacy intact.