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Gaming

Games for GNU/Linux

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Gaming
  • Happy New Year from GamingOnLinux

    GOL itself is now seven and a half years old, and hopefully we will be around for another seven at least!

  • Godot Continues Major Work On Its 3D Renderer For Release In 2017

    Open-source game engine Godot has been working on a multi-month project to vastly improve (and largely rewrite) its 3D renderer to make it as great as its 2D renderer. This work is being done for the Godot 3.0 engine and so far this 3D renderer is seeing a lot of movement.

    Godot 3.0 is aiming for a modern, clustered renderer that supports graphics features similar to other modern game engines like a physically based renderer, global illumination, shadow mapping, and more.

  • Intel's Clear Linux Is Working On Steam Support

    For those planning to do Linux gaming with Intel graphics hardware, you might soon have a new choice with the performance-oriented Clear Linux distribution out of Intel's Open-Source Technology Center.

    Clear Linux developers are currently working on bringing up support for Steam in Clear Linux, something that isn't trivial to do as the operating system tends to be 64-bit focused while Steam still depends upon a mess of 32-bit packages, among other challenges. But Intel developer Arjan van de Ven has shared a photo on Twitter showing the basics of Steam appearing to work on Clear Linux.

  • Former Valve Developer: Steam Linux Project Was The Hardest

    Getting games on Linux and improving OpenGL drivers was the hardest challenge one veteran game developer has come across.

    Rich Geldreich who had worked at Valve for five years shared the most difficult work he's done: Steam for Linux. That's on top of his time at Valve he worked at Microsoft, served as an adjunct professor, was a head researcher for a company since acquired by Google, was CTO for a mobile games company, formerly a principal software engineer at Unity, now an independent consultant / software engineer, and an expert on data compression.

Games for GNU/Linux

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Gaming

Games for GNU/Linux

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Gaming

Wine and Games

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Gaming
  • Release 2.0-rc3

    The Wine Staging release 2.0-rc3 is now available.

  • Possess the bodies of your enemies in 'MidBoss', coming to Linux and should be a day-1 release

    I recently saw 'MidBoss' [Steam, itch.io, Official Site] pop up in my Twitter feed and after seeing how amazing it looked I shot the developer a message. Turns out our friendly neighbourhood porting machine Ethan Lee is doing it and it should be day-1!

  • Postal goes open source after almost 20 years

    "It was in September, 1997—over 19 years ago (we’ll round that out to 20, for marketing reasons)—when us humble folk from Running With Scissors unleashed our Robotron-inspired isometric shooter POSTAL to the unsuspecting public at large," says Running With Scissors via a blog post on its site. "It was an instant hit, grabbing the attention of gamers, parents and politicians across the country, and we’ve been supporting and updating it ever since. But now, (almost) 20 years later, we are entrusting our fans with the future of our game, by releasing its source code to the public. Consider it a belated Christmas present."

Games for GNU/Linux

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Gaming
  • Top 7 Linux games of 2016

    In the 2015 Open Source Yearbook I looked at the best open source games. This year, with the continuing growth of Linux gaming, I've rounded up the top Linux games on Steam. On an average day, some of these games are played by almost a million players. I included both free and non-free games on my list

  • 10 Amazing Linux Terminal Based Games That You Must Know

    Most people associate ‘Linux’ with images of people sitting in front of a system gawking at a screen full of code, devoid of any sort of entertainment.

    But, as I have always maintained throughout our Linux Lexicon series, one should never underestimate the power of the Linux Terminal because it almost always contains things, oblivious to our knowledge, that would easily blow away anyone’s mind.

    Talking about entertainment, more specifically gaming, despite the presence of specially designed Gaming Distros, it remains one of the departments where Linux lags behind the other operating systems.

  • The Original POSTAL Has Been Made Open Source

    It's hard to digest how long ago POSTAL was released. Feels like it was only yesterday that our new fans were sending us wonderful e-mail to praise our work, and we received our very first lawsuit notice... ah, those were the days. But it's true - (nearly) 20 years have passed us by. So much has happened in that time, that it's hard to even keep track of it all - an entire generation has grown into legal adults, while video games have evolved to levels of near-photorealism; plus we're finally getting that VR tech that we've been dreaming of since before we released POSTAL. It's been a long and eventful couple of decades, full of change and advancement, but there is one thing that has always remained constant - our continued support and updates for our baby. Thanks to the dedicated hard-workers in our team, the loving support of our fans and even the efforts by our detractors, POSTAL has seen a lot of activity during these many years - an expansion pack, a lawsuit by the Postal Service, an exclusive Japanese edition, bans in 14 countries across the world, re-released special editions, sequels, digital re-releases, an Android port, new updates with twin-stick controls, a novelization and even an enhanced modern remake. Not too shabby for one of "the three worst things in American society", wouldn't you agree?

  • Postal Source Code Available For Public Download

    If you ever wanted to create your own Postal clone, there’s a now a possibility to do so given that Running With Scissors have released the game’s source code to the public. And you can download the source code… right now.

Games for GNU/Linux

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Gaming

Games for GNU/Linux

Filed under
Gaming

Games for GNU/Linux

Filed under
Gaming

  • Our 2016 Linux Game Picks

    We decided not to call this the top 10 best Linux games of 2016, because that would suggest we can have an informed opinion about every little game that was released in the past 11~12 months – and that would be just wrong, as our time is limited and there is no way we could have enough time to play most titles out there for Linux.

    So we will focus on what we thought was great based on what we had time to play. There won’t be any particular order (who cares), so don’t assume the first one or the last one is our top 1 pick or something. Alright, let’s go through our picks then.

  • OpenMW 0.41 Continues Re-Implementing Elderscrolls III: Morrowind

    OpenMW 0.41 was released today as the newest version of this open-source game project working to re-implement the game engine found within Elderscrolls III: Morrowind.

    OpenMW 0.41 implements more capabilities such as particle textures for spell effects, AI combat improvements, support for water rendering in OpenMW-CS, and much more. OpenMW 0.41 also has dozens of bug-fixes.

  • Denuvo Spins Doom Dropping Its DRM Into A Victory Dance

    The speed with which the prevailing opinion of Denuvo, the DRM unicorn de jour, has changed has been nearly enough to make one's head spin. It was only at the start of 2016 that the software was being rolled out en masse by many game publishers, leading some normally bombastic cracking groups to predict that the video game industry had finally found its final solution to piracy. That lasted until roughly the middle months of the year, when several games using the DRM were cracked. While Denuvo's makers remained fairly silent, the opinion of it shifted from "final solution" to "hey, it's still the hardest DRM to crack." Cracking groups that typically measure their work in weeks were finding cracking Denuvo to be a project measured in months. That likely explained why so many big-ticket games still used it. Until, somewhat suddenly, multiple big-name games began dropping Denuvo from their code via patches and updates. The latest example of this was Doom silently nixing Denuvo, with id Software not even referencing the move in its patch notes.

    And so the speculation began as to what was going on. Some said the game makers were finally realizing that DRM is pretty much useless at everything other than being a minor inconvenience for cracking groups and a major inconvenience for many legitimate customers. Others suggested that perhaps Denuvo offered some kind of money-back deal if a game using it was cracked within a certain time-frame. Still others claimed that publishers were only using the DRM during the initial release window of the game to protect it during the most crucial sales period, and then dropping it afterwards.

  • Linux Gaming Was Great In 2016, But 2017 Should Be Even Better

    Most of you will probably agree that 2016 was the best year yet for Linux gaming with having a ton of new game releases, several of which were AAA game titles, the premiere of Vulkan is an important step for the future, Valve working on Linux VR efforts, and the Linux graphics drivers getting into better shape for handling the next era of Linux games.

    While 2016 was great, some of you may have been let down by still the relatively minor amount of AAA games making their way to Linux especially on a quick turnaround time to the Windows game releases. There are also some that may have felt letdown by the relatively minor movements around Steam Machines and SteamOS this calendar year, the Steam Linux gaming percentage being around 1% or less, Linux VR support not yet up to scratch, some Linux game ports still performing significantly lower than their Windows ports, etc.

  • DOOM 2016 on Ubuntu Linux via Wine (Vulkan on GTX 1070)

Games for GNU/Linux

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Wine 2.0

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today's leftovers

FOSS in the European Union

  • Competition authorities first to implement DMS services
    The DRS are published as open source software using the European Union’s open source software licence EUPL, and are available on Joinup. The software provides connectors for most commonly-used document management systems, and includes scripts to create a database to implement the connecting web services.
  • Czech Republic is at the forefront of an open data international project
    With the beginning of the new year, an international project “Open crowdsourcing data related to the quality of service of high-speed Internet” was launched, which aims to encourage the development of open data in the user’s measurement of high-speed Internet.