Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Gaming

PSP sells 600,000 in first week

Filed under
Gaming

PSP adds $150 million to Sony coffers in seven days; performance noted as good, not great by analysts.

REVIEWS: 'Chaos,' 'God of War' deliver

Filed under
Reviews
Gaming

For a strategic, methodical approach to action games, "Tom Clancy's Splinter Cell: Chaos Theory" is worth the $50. For the same price, "God of War" is a frenzied, breathless experience that'll leave your fingers ached and cramping.

Quake IV for QuakeCon 10th anniversary

Filed under
Gaming

For years, the fragging faithful have gathered for what has become Valhalla for worshippers of first-person shooters. The event is known as QuakeCon, and as the gathering of gamers turns 10 this year, Hollenshead states, "We'll have Quake IV multiplayer to play."

'Game theft' led to fatal attack

Filed under
Gaming
Legal

Shanghai gamer Qiu Chengwei killed player Zhu Caoyuan when he discovered he had sold a "dragon sabre" he had been loaned, said the china Daily.

Mr Chengwei only got the powerful virtual weapon shortly before it was sold for 7,200 yuan (£460) or about $800US.

Before the attack Mr Chengwei told police about the theft who said the weapon was not real property.

Carmack going mobile with Doom RPG

Filed under
Gaming
Sci/Tech

Following the release of Doom 3, many speculated what project its creator John Carmack would take on next. However, few would have guessed that project would be...a mobile phone game?

'Matrix Online' a new virtual reality

Filed under
Web
Gaming

You've watched the movies. Now you can jack in and play it - no cranial implants required. After months of testing and two years since the sequels, the persistent virtual reality of "The Matrix Online" is available for U.S. gamers.

First Details on Next-Gen UT

Filed under
Gaming

The May 2005 issue of Computer Gaming World magazine contains the first screenshots and information on the next, Unreal Engine 3 powered Unreal Tournament game, including incredible revelations about the massive new Conquest gametype.

Game Rush hosts Doom 3 midnight sale

Filed under
Gaming

Members of Texas-based id software, Doom3's developer, will be on hand at the Game Rush store, Blockbuster's gaming branch, on 6437 Hillcrest Avenue in Dallas to meet fans, sign autographs, and give away Doom 3-related merchandise.

Sony responds to PSP dead-pixel reports

Filed under
Gaming

SCEA downplays widespread reports of LCD screen problems, says warranty is still in effect and defective units can be exchanged.

Matrix Online (finally) jacks in

Filed under
Gaming

Following months of delays and a publisher switch, Sega and Warner Bros. Interactive Entertainment launch the sci-fi film trilogy-inspired MMORPG.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Red Hat News/Leftovers

Cloudgizer: An introduction to a new open source web development tool

Cloudgizer is a free open source tool for building web applications. It combines the ease of scripting languages with the performance of C, helping manage the development effort and run-time resources for cloud applications. Cloudgizer works on Red Hat/CentOS Linux with the Apache web server and MariaDB database. It is licensed under Apache License version 2. Read more

James Bottomley on Linux, Containers, and the Leading Edge

It’s no secret that Linux is basically the operating system of containers, and containers are the future of the cloud, says James Bottomley, Distinguished Engineer at IBM Research and Linux kernel developer. Bottomley, who can often be seen at open source events in his signature bow tie, is focused these days on security systems like the Trusted Platform Module and the fundamentals of container technology. Read more

TransmogrifAI From Salesforce

  • Salesforce plans to open-source the technology behind its Einstein machine-learning services
    Salesforce is open-sourcing the method it has developed for using machine-learning techniques at scale — without mixing valuable customer data — in hopes other companies struggling with data science problems can benefit from its work. The company plans to announce Thursday that TransmogrifAI, which is a key part of the Einstein machine-learning services that it believes are the future of its flagship Sales Cloud and related services, will be available for anyone to use in their software-as-a-service applications. Consisting of less than 10 lines of code written on top of the widely used Apache Spark open-source project, it is the result of years of work on training machine-learning models to predict customer behavior without dumping all of that data into a common training ground, said Shubha Nabar, senior director of data science for Salesforce Einstein.
  • Salesforce open-sources TransmogrifAI, the machine learning library that powers Einstein
    Machine learning models — artificial intelligence (AI) that identifies relationships among hundreds, thousands, or even millions of data points — are rarely easy to architect. Data scientists spend weeks and months not only preprocessing the data on which the models are to be trained, but extracting useful features (i.e., the data types) from that data, narrowing down algorithms, and ultimately building (or attempting to build) a system that performs well not just within the confines of a lab, but in the real world.