Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Gaming

Games: Soul Calibur 6, Lutris and More

Filed under
Gaming
  • Soul Calibur 6 on Linux Might Be Banning Steam Players

    Over the weekend, Soul Calibur 6 Linux players discovered that the game will ban their account if they try to go online. Not even going back to Windows will let them play networked multiplayer. While Soul Calibur 6 doesn’t have an official port to Linux, it is supported through Steam’s Steam Play program using Proton. Added by Valve earlier this year, this compatibility layer enables Windows games on the platform.

    While some initially blamed the Denovo DRM for the issue, the problem seems to be with the game’s anti-cheat system. As noted on Reddit, Tekken 7 also supports Denovo and Proton and has not run into any issues with Linux players. Since both games come from the same publisher, it’s safe to assume that something else is at work here. Neither Bandai Namco or Valve have come out with a statement regarding the issue at this time.

  • You’ll get banned from Soulcalibur 6 if you run it in Linux

    Linux historically hasn’t been a robust gaming platform, though Valve’s Steam Play features aim to change that. But Soulcalibur VI shows some unfortunate side-effects from those measures, as players are getting banned from online play if they launch the game using those built-in Linux compatibility features. Worse yet, the ban is account-wide – so you’re still out of luck even if you switch to Windows.

    If you launch Soulcalibur VI using Steam Play on Linux, you won’t be able to play online. Reinstalling won’t help, nor will installing the game on separate PC, or switching to Windows. The ban appears to be linked directly to your Steam account, so your online recourse would be to repurchase the game on a separate account.

  • Lutris: Linux game management made easy

    If you use Linux and enjoy playing video games, life has been pretty good lately. Valve, Unity, Unreal Engine, and other big-name forces have pulled the video game industry into Linux compatibility so thoroughly that if you use Steam, you likely own more Linux-compatible games than you have time to play (and with Proton and Steam Play, that number's about to increase).

    If you're a fan of indie games, Itch.io and a wide variety of game sprints such as the Open Jam are making it easy to find truly excellent games for Linux. Vendors like GOG.com and Humble Bundle offer lots of games new and old. And finally, you can find plenty of games in your distribution's repositories, game emulators for old consoles, and online games.

  • The rather retro looking RPG 'Afelhem' arrives in Early Access

    For those who love your rather retro looking RPG experiences, Afelhem entered Early Access recently with Linux support.

  • The super sweet Slime Rancher just had a nice optimisation update

    Slime Rancher, the delightfully sweet game about adventure, exploration and capturing funny little (and sometimes not so little) Slimes just had a good optimisation update.

    It always ran pretty well for me, although on the highest settings it definitely feels quite a bit smoother after this update. The developer said they upgraded the game engine version (Unity) as well as "all game data has been reorganized to optimize the way we store data and manage certain game states".

  • Desert Kill looks like it could be a somewhat amusing top-down action shooter

    When asking the developer to confirm it will support Linux, since the Steam store page does have a Linux system requirements tab they simply said "We'll make it soon ;)".

  • You can now fulfil your dream of dungeon crawling as a mermaid in Serenade of the Sirens

    Wannabe mermaids of the world can now take down evil sirens in the dungeon crawler Serenade of the Sirens, now in Early Access.

Games: EXAPUNKS, The Colonists, Gaia's Melody: Echoed Melodies, Hitman 2 and Lots More

Filed under
Gaming

Games: Linux Soul Calibur VI, Linux Gaming Benchmarks, Epicinium, Humble Very Positive Sale and More

Filed under
Gaming

Games: Ion Maiden, Hazelnut Bastille and More

Filed under
Gaming

Lakka – Transform Your Old PC into a Retrogaming Console

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Gaming

Lakka is a free, lightweight, and open-source Linux distro that turns a small PC into a full-blown game console. It features a beautiful and user-friendly UI with eye candy colours and a PS4-like User Experience.

You can install it on your SD card and easily set it up or run it LIVE. Its wide range of joypad support allows you to use PlayStation, XBox, and Nintendo game controllers.

If you don’t have a PC to use Lakka on you can dedicated hardware at a cost as low as $30 thanks to its support for a variety of computers not excluding Raspberry Pi, Raspberry 2, HummingBoard, Banana Po, Odroid, CuBox-i, Cubietruck, and Cubieboard 2.

Lakka is the official OS of RetroArch which takes care of its inputs and display, and it implements all game systems as a libretro core. This separation ensures that users are able to configure their setup once and have their changes effected across all game systems.

Read more

Games: MMORPGs, Disappointment From One Hour One Life and Linux port of Total War: WARHAMMER II

Filed under
Gaming

NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2070 Linux Gaming Benchmarks

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Gaming

Last week following the launch of the RTX 2070 Turing graphics cards, I carried out some initial RTX 2070 compute benchmarks including of TensorFlow and more common OpenCL/CUDA workloads. The GPU compute performance for this $499+ Turing GPU was quite good and especially for INT16 test cases often beating the GTX 1080 Ti. Available now are the Linux gaming benchmarks for the GeForce RTX 2070 compared to an assortment of other NVIDIA GeForce and AMD Radeon graphics cards on Ubuntu 18.10.

As a quick recap, the GeForce RTX 2070 has 2304 CUDA cores, 1410MHz base clock, 1620MHz boost clock, and is capable of 42T RTX-OPS and 6 Giga Rays/s for ray-tracing, granted it will likely be some time before seeing any serious Linux games with RTX/ray-tracing support. The GeForce RTX 2070 graphics cards rely upon 8GB of GDDR6 video memory yielding 448GB/s of memory bandwidth.

Read more

Games: Depth of Extinction Scandal, BATTLETECH, Das Geisterschiff, Entangled, Red Embrace: Hollywood, Rogue Bit and Lutris

Filed under
Gaming

Games: To Leave, Squally, and More

Filed under
Gaming

Intel Core i9 9900K vs. AMD Ryzen 7 2700X Linux Gaming Benchmarks

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Gaming

Complementing the just-published Intel Core i9 9900K Linux benchmarks with the launch-day embargo lift are the Linux gaming benchmarks... This article is looking at the Linux performance between the Core i9 9900K and AMD's Ryzen 7 2700X in a variety of native Linux games as well as comparing the performance-per-Watt. So if you are a Linux gamer and deciding between these sub-$500 processors, this article is for you.

If you didn't yet read the main article that features a 15-way CPU comparison on Ubuntu 18.10 with the Linux 4.19 kernel, here is a recap of this new Coffeelake refresh CPU. The Core i9 9900K is an eight-core / sixteen-thread processor with 3.6GHz base frequency and 5.0GHz turbo frequency. This 14nm CPU has a 16MB L3 cache, dual channel DDR4-2666 support, and a 95 Watt TDP. There is also the onboard UHD Graphics 630, but if you're a gamer, that isn't going to cut it. The Core i9 9900K is launching at $499 USD.

Read more

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Mozilla: Firefox, Reps, Encryption and Testday Results

  • Firefox Ups the Ante with Latest Test Pilot Experiment: Price Wise and Email Tabs
    Over the last few years, the Test Pilot team has developed innovative features for Firefox desktop and mobile, collaborating directly with Firefox users to improve the browser – from reminders to return to a tab on your desktop to a simple and secure way to keep track of your passwords. Today, just in time for the holiday shopping season, the Firefox Test Pilot team is introducing Price Wise and Email Tabs — the latest experimental features designed to give users more choice and transparency when shopping online. These game-changing desktop tools are sure to make shopping a breeze with more options to save, share, track and shop. We’ve also made a few updates to the Test Pilot program itself to make it even easier to become a part of the growing Firefox users testing new features.
  • Let Price Wise track prices for you this holiday shopping season
    The online shopping experience is really geared towards purchases that are made immediately. Countless hours have been spent to get you checked out as soon as possible. If you know what you want, and you’re happy with the price, this is great. On the other hand, sometimes you want to take your time, and wait for a deal. For those times, we have our new Test Pilot experiment, Price Wise.
  • Sharing links via email just got easier thanks to Email Tabs
    If your family is anything like ours, the moment the calendar flips to October, you’re getting texts and emails asking for holiday wish lists. Email remains one of the top ways people save and share online, so you likely do what we do: help make everyone’s life easier by diligently copy and pasting the URLs, titles and descriptions into a list. What if Firefox could make that process easier? Thanks to our new Test Pilot experiment Email Tabs, it can.
  • Mozilla Reps Community: Rep of the Month – October 2018
    Please join us in congratulating Tim Maks van den Broek, our Rep of the Month for October 2018! Tim is one of our most active members in the Dutch community. During his 15+ years as a Mozilla Volunteer he has touched many parts of the Project. More recently his focus is on user support and he is active in our Reps Onboarding team.
  • As far as I'm concerned, email signing/encryption is dead
    A while back, I used to communicate a lot with users of my popular open source project. So it made sense to sign emails and let people verify — it’s really me writing. It also gave people a way to encrypt their communication with me. The decision in favor of S/MIME rather than PGP wasn’t because of any technical advantage. The support for S/MIME is simply built into many email clients by default, so the chances that the other side would be able to recognize the signature were higher.
  • Firefox 64 Beta 8 Testday Results
    As you may already know, last Friday November 09th – we held a new Testday event, for Firefox 64 Beta 8. Thank you all for helping us make Mozilla a better place: Gabriela, gaby2300. From Bangladesh team: Maruf Rahman, Tanvir Rahman, Md. Raihan Ali, Sajedul Islam, Rizbanul Hasan, Mehedi Hasan, Md. Rahimul Islam, Shah Yashfique Bhuian.

today's howtos

Latest Games for GNU/Linux

  • Little Misfortune is a sweet looking adventure, should hopefully get Linux support
    From the same developer who made Fran Bow (which supports Linux), Little Misfortune is what they're calling an interactive story. With a focus on exploration and the characters, including sweet and dark elements with choices that have consequences. With that in mind, when I spoke to the developer in regards to a Linux build they said "We will try to have it, yes! :)". Not solid, but a very positive response especially since they've supported Linux before.
  • Luna and the Moonling is a sweet puzzle game that's now available on Linux
    Luna and the Moonling from Greyborn Studios is a colourful puzzle game with an aim to put a new spin on block-pushing puzzle gameplay. Note: Key provided by the developer. For those who aren't aware, some of the people from Greyborn Studios previously worked on some pretty major titles like System Shock 2, Thief, Skylanders, Red Faction and quite a few more. "From the moment we released in early access last year we’ve had requests from Linux gamers to support the platform," said Michael Ryan, CTO & Technical Director of Greyborn Studios. "We’re big fans of the platform ourselves and were happy to oblige. We really hope Linux users enjoy the game, and welcome them to the Greyborn community," Ryan said.
  • Odd Realm is a sandbox settlement builder inspired by Dwarf Fortress and Rimworld with Linux support
  • Valve gave out more details about Artifact, including some public APIs and pre-order is up
    Artifact, the multi-lane card game from Valve is closing in on release and so Valve have given out a bunch of new details on what to expect. Firstly, it's now up for pre-order on Steam for £15.99/$20 and for that price you will get 10 card packs, 5 event tickets, and two complete starter decks. Considering how much such packs cost for real-life card games, that price is actually quite reasonable I think. Additional packs of cards will be $1.99, each pack has 12 random cards. You will also be able to buy and sell cards on the Steam Market.
  • Zeon 25, a retro-inspired hardcore shoot 'em up is now in Early Access
    The Doom-inspired UI bar along the bottom looked quite amusing, haven't really seen many games do something like that in recent years. Looks like it could be worth a shot, the action looks intense enough to keep me interested for sure. While it's in Early Access, they're hoping to add a co-op mode along with new maps, new enemies, new levels and so on. The full release is currently scheduled for Q1 2019 although that may change depending on how much feedback they get during development.
  • Neuroslicers is a narrative driven, online competitive cyberpunk RTS that will have Linux support
    Neuroslicers from developer Dream Harvest seems like a very interesting title. A narrative driven, online competitive cyberpunk RTS and it will be coming to Linux.
  • Feral Interactive have put out the system requirements for Total War: WARHAMMER II, due on Linux this month
    Ready your swords and your axe as Total War: WARHAMMER II is heading to Linux this month and Feral Interactive have now put up the system requirements.
  • Here's What You Need to Play Total War: WARHAMMER II on Linux and macOS
    UK based video games publisher Feral Interactive revealed today the official system requirements of the Total War: WARHAMMER II video game for Linux and Mac systems. In mid-June, Feral Interactive teased Linux and Mac gamers with the upcoming release of the Total War: WARHAMMER II port for their beloved platforms, the sequel to the critically acclaimed Total War: WARHAMMER video game released more than two years ago. The company said that the Linux and macOS port is coming in November. Well, November is here, and now Feral Interactive has revealed the official system requirements for playing the Total War: WARHAMMER II video game on Linux and macOS-powered computers, saying that the port will be available on these two platforms later this month.
  • Warhammer: Vermintide 2 ‘Back to Ubersreik’ DLC Remasters Three Maps From The First Game
    Warhammer: Vermintide 2, Fatshark’s first person rat-murdering action game, will be getting another DLC next month. The Back to Ubersreik DLC takes players to the setting of the first Vermintide game, and will feature remasters of three maps seen in the original Vermintide.
  • Dungeon crawler Ebony Spire: Heresy has a rather nice Anniversary Update that's worth a look
    After managing to sell a few thousand copies, the dungeon crawler Ebony Spire: Heresy has a great update now available. For those who missed the story, the developer Bearded Giant Games initially failed to really get anywhere with the game. They wrote a post on Gamasutra about it, where they said it had been a "a soul crushing experience". A pretty sobering reading, as game development has become so much harder in the past few years with stores being flooded with new games. Anyway, many months later they managed to hit over 6,000 sales and so this update is a thank you for keeping the developer going.

IBM/Red Hat: Moving, Supercomputing and How IBM and Red Hat Will Impact Your Cloud Strategy

  • Moving house and moving applications are not the same. Or are they?
    As a Solution Architect I see my job as many things, from supporting customers in adopting Red Hat technology, educating organisations about using open source technologies and the benefits it brings, to thinking of ways to solve business challenges using technology and culture change. However, these are all generally in the space of “green field” app development. But what about all the systems keeping the business going today? The challenges businesses face in dealing with these “legacy” systems are complex, multi-faceted, involve many teams, and often businesses face knowledge gaps in how everything works together. In the public sector, where I work, this problem of legacy systems is arguably larger and more challenging, with the need for organisations to share information, outlined by things like Digital Service Standard. But, it’s worked that way for years, so why change it?
  • Red Hat at Supercomputing 2018: Bringing open source innovation from high performance computing to the enterprise
    All supercomputers on the coveted Top500 list run on Linux, a scalable operating system that has matured over the years to run some of the most critical workloads and in many cases has displaced proprietary operating systems in the process. For the past two decades, Red Hat Enterprise Linux has served as the foundation for building software stacks for many supercomputers. We are looking to continue this trend with the next generation of systems that seek to break the exascale threshold. SC18, a leading supercomputing conference, begins today. Red Hat hopes to hold conversations and share our insights on new supercomputers, including Summit and Sierra, nascent architectures, like Arm, and building more open computing environments that can further negate the need for proprietary and monolithic implementations. The updated Top500 list is an excellent example of how open technologies continue to proliferate in high performance computing (HPC) and highlights how the ongoing software optimization work performed on these systems can benefit their performance.
  • New TOP500 List Lead by DOE Supercomputers
    The latest TOP500 list of the world’s fastest supercomputers is out, a remarkable ranking that shows five Department of Energy supercomputers in the top 10, with the first two captured by Summit at Oak Ridge and Sierra at Livermore. With the number one and number two systems on the planet, the “Rebel Alliance” vendors of IBM, Mellanox, and NVIDIA stand far and tall above the others.
  • How IBM and Red Hat Will Impact Your Cloud Strategy
    Barring a heavy-handed approach to the recent acquisition, IBM and Red Hat can do some amazing things in the market. IBM is a long way from making physical machines. That part of the business went with Lenovo several years ago. So, what has been their focus ever since? Software and services. And, among those software pieces and services has been the cloud. Until today, you may have heard little about IBM’s cloud presence. Although I can assure you it’s there, it was really struggling to compete with the likes of AWS, Azure, and even GCP. Now, with predictions like those from Gartner stating that by 2020, 90% of organizations will adopt hybrid infrastructure management capabilities and that the market in general could be worth $240 billion or more – this was as good a time as any to really take a dive into the cloud management and delivery ecosystem.
  • Improved support information for RHEL on Azure: sosreport plugin updated [Ed: The author a "Microsoft MVP for Visual Studio" (Red Hat hiring them)]