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Gaming

Games: Cold Beam, Unvanquished, Vendetta Online

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Gaming

Leftovers: Gaming and Graphics

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Gaming
  • Trying The Radeon RX 480 & R9 Fury With The AMDGPU Code For Linux 4.8

    With the main batch of Radeon/AMDGPU driver changes ready for DRM-Next that will in turn land for the Linux 4.8 kernel, I've begun testing this new code with various AMD GPUs. Here are my AMDGPU results when comparing Linux 4.7 Git to this code that's coming for Linux 4.8 with a Radeon R9 Fury and RX 480.

    Yesterday I built a fresh Ubuntu kernel of this new drm-next-4.8 Radeon/AMDGPU material merged back atop its Linux 4.7 drm-fixes code. This was pointed out by Alex in the forums due to not all of the drm-fixes being mainlined yet for the RX 480. If you are interested in trying out this Linux 4.7 drm-fixes + drm-next-4.8 kernel for Radeon/AMDGPU, you can find it on Phoronix.net: linux-image-4.7.0-rc5-4.8-next-plus-fixes_4.7.0-rc5-4.8-next-plus-fixes-1_amd64.deb.

  • Mesa 12 released, Vulkan for Intel, OpenGL 4.3 and more for open source graphics users

    Wow, Mesa 12 has officially been released and it's a huge release for them! Intel now supports Vulkan, their OpenGL is up to 4.3 and more.

  • Starbound to finally leave Early Access on July 22nd

    After a number of years in development Starbound is finally about to get a full release and I can't wait to play it in full!

    We actually ran a server for it a long while ago, so would you guys be interested if we ran a Linux gamer server again? If enough people are interested I will do it for sure as it will be nice to play it with others.

  • Have you seen Black Ice? A really rather cool hack and shoot FPS with Linux & SteamOS support

    Black Ice is a game I have followed for a long time (and personally purchased a copy) and it just released a rather nice update. If you're an FPS fan and looking for something to sink some time into, this could be what you need.

    It's rather different to any other FPS I've played before, as you go around hacking into different buildings with assorted difficulty levels, and from the hack a bunch of enemies spawn.

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming
  • Haven Moon rises today on Windows, Mac, and Linux

    The trailer and screenshots of Haven Moon show off some of its fantastical landscapes and machinery in crisp detail. What they don't show is that although rendered in real-time 3D, Roussel has designed the game to be played entirely with the mouse. Your journey across Seleos reveals a "calm and lonely place where you hear the sounds of the sea, the wind and the beautiful music." You'll also encounter a variety of puzzles that are fully integrated with the story and promise to be "not too hard nor too easy, just like the length of the adventure is made to be not too long nor too short. Everything is balanced to provide a light relaxing and peaceful experience, to spend a pleasant time in an imaginary world."

  • LucasArts’ Habitat Compiled and Preserved on Github in Historic Achievement

    It’s important for us, as gamers, to know our favorite medium’s past. Doing so informs us of what past developers did well, what they didn’t do well, what kinds of gaming experiences and knowledge manifest today in altered or re-interpreted forms, and which directions games might be heading both technically and conceptually. It’s especially important to learn about gaming’s past in our current era, where information is ephemeral and is especially prone to being misinterpreted due to rapid communications technologies. Institutions like the Museum of Art and Digital Entertainment (and the planned Videogame History Museum in Frisco, Texas) and websites like The Cutting Room Floor help us achieve that task in various ways. Source code repositories like Github, meanwhile, archive the essential components of specific games in more literal forms.

  • A classic MMO goes open source, The Other 99 comes to Linux, and more gaming news

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming
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