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Gaming

Leftovers: Gaming

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Gaming
  • Some thoughts on 'Codex of Victory', the mix of turn-based and real time strategy

    It's a mix of turn-based battles with some real-time base building. The base building aspect is a little like XCOM 2 with a side-on view as you dig out rooms. The whole game feels like it was inspired by XCOM 1 & 2, as you send over units to different regions to perform missions. You even speed up time at will when outside of missions, so it's all very familiar.

  • Overload, the shiny new six-degree-of-freedom shooter has entered Early Access

    The game was funded thanks to Kickstarter, where the developers nabbed $306,537 from helpful people wanting to see it become a reality. It's also nice that another Kickstarter team actually managed day-1 Linux support.

    The team behind Overload actually has some of the originally Descent team and the co-founder of the studio even worked on Freespace 1 & 2, which are my two all time favourite space shooters. I'm really not surprised the game has already turned out so well!

Games for GNU/Linux

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Gaming

Games and Wine

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Gaming

Games for GNU/Linux

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Gaming

Games for GNU/Linux: Deus Ex: Mankind Divided, Serious Sam Fusion 2017

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Gaming

Leftovers: Gaming

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Gaming

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming

Leftovers: Gaming

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Gaming

Games and Graphics

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Gaming
  • GeForce GTX 1080 Ti: Core i7 7700K vs. Ryzen 7 1800X Linux Gaming Performance

    Since last week's tests of the GeForce GTX 1080 Ti, a number of Phoronix readers have requested tests of this high-end GP102 graphics card to be done under both the AMD Ryzen 7 1800X and Core i7 7700K. Here are those OpenGL and Vulkan gaming results for those looking at high-end Linux gaming performance.

  • Arceri Is Working To Further Improve Mesa's Shader Cache Startup Performance

    Timothy Arceri at Valve is still working on the on-disk Mesa shader cache even though the GLSL/TGSI shader cache and RadeonSI binary caches have landed. In particular, his recent effort has been about improving the cold performance -- or when there isn't a shader cache present or it needs to be re-generated.

    Then the shader cache is cold, he and others riding Mesa Git have found it to be much slower than the previous behavior or when the shader cache is disabled on Mesa Git. As of a few days ago, Deus Ex: Mankind Divided took three minutes and 15 seconds to load with the shader cache disabled, but four minutes and 23 seconds to load when the cache is enabled but cold. Fortunately, he's worked out a patch to reduce that cold cache time to three minutes and 33 seconds. So there is still some time involved when needing to store the shader in the cache, but it's much better than before. That patch is outlined here.

  • Nouveau Patch For Enabling The GLSL/TGSI On-Disk Shader Cache
  • The Linux Game Jam 2017 is a thing now, go sign up
  • City Climber, a silly physics-based game about climbing released for Linux, some thoughts

    GOL contributor SangreDeReptil wrote about City Climber [Steam] coming to Linux last year and now this silly physics-based climbing game has a Linux release. I checked it out!

Games for GNU/Linux

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Gaming
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More in Tux Machines

Security Leftovers

  • Someone is putting lots of work into hacking Github developers [Ed: Dan Goodin doesn't know that everything is under attack and cracking attempts just about all the time?]
    Open-source developers who use Github are in the cross-hairs of advanced malware that has steal passwords, download sensitive files, take screenshots, and self-destruct when necessary.
  • Security Orchestration and Incident Response
    Technology continues to advance, and this is all a changing target. Eventually, computers will become intelligent enough to replace people at real-time incident response. My guess, though, is that computers are not going to get there by collecting enough data to be certain. More likely, they'll develop the ability to exhibit understanding and operate in a world of uncertainty. That's a much harder goal. Yes, today, this is all science fiction. But it's not stupid science fiction, and it might become reality during the lifetimes of our children. Until then, we need people in the loop. Orchestration is a way to achieve that.

Leftover: Development (Linux)

  • Swan: Better Linux on Windows
    If you are a Linux user that has to use Windows — or even a Windows user that needs some Linux support — Cygwin has long been a great tool for getting things done. It provides a nearly complete Linux toolset. It also provides almost the entire Linux API, so that anything it doesn’t supply can probably be built from source. You can even write code on Windows, compile and test it and (usually) port it over to Linux painlessly.
  • Lint for Shell Scripters
    It used to be one of the joys of writing embedded software was never having to deploy shell scripts. But now with platforms like the Raspberry Pi becoming very common, Linux shell scripts can be a big part of a system–even the whole system, in some cases. How do you know your shell script is error-free before you deploy it? Of course, nothing can catch all errors, but you might try ShellCheck.
  • Android: Enabling mainline graphics
    Android uses the HWC API to communicate with graphics hardware. This API is not supported on the mainline Linux graphics stack, but by using drm_hwcomposer as a shim it now is. The HWC (Hardware Composer) API is used by SurfaceFlinger for compositing layers to the screen. The HWC abstracts objects such as overlays and 2D blitters and helps offload some work that would normally be done with OpenGL. SurfaceFlinger on the other hand accepts buffers from multiple sources, composites them, and sends them to the display.
  • Collabora's Devs Make Android's HWC API Work in Mainline Linux Graphics Stack
    Collabora's Mark Filion informs Softpedia today about the latest work done by various Collabora developers in collaboration with Google's ChromeOS team to enable mainline graphics on Android. The latest blog post published by Collabora's Robert Foss reveals the fact that both team managed to develop a shim called drm_hwcomposer, which should enable Android's HWC (Hardware Composer) API to communicate with the graphics hardware, including Android 7.0's version 2 HWC API.

today's howtos

Reports From and About Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF)