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Gaming

Unreal Engine 4.2 feature preview shows inclusion of Vehicles & Camera Animations

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Gaming

Following hot on the foot of the last update to the Unreal Engine, the update version 4.1, Epic is now gearing up for the next version of the Unreal Engine, version 4.2. A new blog post has been put up on the official Unreal Engine website previewing the various features of the latest update to the engine. The major update to this version is perhaps the inclusion of Vehicles, Camera Animations & tighter integration to Blueprints, along with other little features and tweaks & bug fixes common to new versions.

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Leftovers: Gaming

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Gaming

Leftovers: Gaming

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Gaming

Valve Releases New Steam Update with Another Ubuntu 14.04 LTS Fix

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Gaming
Ubuntu

Between stable builds, the developers launch a large number of Beta versions that integrate a lot of new features. The previous update for this branch was a really small one, but now a more important version has been released, prompting users to upgrade the application.

Most of the time, the Steam client is pretty stable and users don't usually encounter any problems with it, either about performance or stability. This doesn't mean that the software is perfect, because there still are instances where some features or options might not work as expected.

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Leftovers: Gaming

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Gaming

Tesseract Is Looking Okay For A Small, Open-Source Game

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OSS
Gaming

Yesterday marked the first release of Tesseract, the open-source game forked from the Cube 2: Sauerbraten code-base two years ago and since then has just been worked on by a handful of open-source developers. After trying out this inaugural Tesseract version, it's quite a nice small game with decent OpenGL visual capabilities and okay textures with its in-game assets being comparable roughly to Xonotic or Unvanquished.

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Leftovers: Gaming

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Gaming

'Half-Life 2' and 'Portal' arrive on Android, but only for the Shield

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Android
Gaming

Two of Valve's undisputed classics are making their Android debut today, courtesy of Nvidia's Shield console: Portal and Half-Life 2. Costing $10 each, the two games were ported by Nvidia, which explains why they're only playable on the Shield. Still, the job has been done with Valve's unreserved blessing and a promise by Doug Lombardi that you "can expect the same gameplay" as on the original PC versions. Even if the recreations aren't perfect, having two of the PC's greatest titles available on the Shield brings it a lot closer to its promise of being a true mobile console. With a price cut to $199 and a growing library of games and features, Nvidia's efforts at recreating PC-class gaming on an Android portable are looking increasingly compelling.

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FreeBSD 10.1 Has The New VT Driver, Hardware Improvements

Released this past week was the first beta of FreeBSD 10.1. If you haven't yet had time to explore this development release, there's a lot of improvements over FreeBSD 10.0. Here's some of the features that interest us the most about this forthcoming FreeBSD 10 update: - The driver for FreeBSD's new VT console has been added. The new VT hasn't been enabled by default but for now still requires setting a special parameter. - The ported-from-Linux Radeon DRM/KMS driver now has support for 32-bit ioctls so 32-bit OpenGL applications are able to run on a 64-bit FreeBSD system. - Various hardware-related improvements from Turbo Boost enabled Intel CPUs to PowerPC 970 CPUs to Atom Silvermont to Apple books saw different changes. - Bhyve virtualization improvements. Find out more about the recent FreeBSD 10 changes via the stable release notes. FreeBSD 10.1 is expected for an official unveiling on 29 October. Read more

Android tablet records and recreates 3D scenes

Mantis Vision and Flextronics unveiled an Android-based “Aquila” tablet based on Mantis’ MV4D 3D engine that uses a 3D sensing system to recreate 3D scenes. So-called 3D tablets, which display 3D video and other content with or without special glasses, never hit it big among consumers. Now Israeli 3D vision technology firm Mantis Vision and manufacturer Flextronics have built a different kind of tablet called the Aquila. It not only displays 3D content, but records, recreates it, and lets you manipulate the image in 3D or integrate it into applications. Read more

REVIEW: How to turn a Raspberry Pi in to an NSA-proof computer

One of the Pi's key attributes is its price of around £30. It is the nearest thing we have to a disposable computer and several can be used cost-effectively in a single project. A recently publicised use is the creation of a string of Raspberry Pi honeypots for detecting hacker activity on a corporate network. Given CW's enduring preoccupation with the surveillance programs of our Establishment masters, would it be, could it be possible to create a disposable, network-invisible computer? Read more

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