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Gaming

Leftovers: Gaming (X-Plane and 'Battle Chasers: Nightwar')

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Gaming
  • X-Plane 11 Beta Now Available, Demo Too

    Laminar Research has released their first public beta of the massive X-Plane 11.0 flight simulator update. It's a huge update and expect some bugs at this stage, but should be a very exciting release.

  • X-Plane 11 now in beta, also has a demo available

    X-Plane 11 is nearing release, so the developers have put up a beta and a demo of the beta for you to try before you buy.

  • 'Battle Chasers: Nightwar' is a visually stunning RPG inspired by a comic, that might be released next year

    I can count with the fingers of a single hand the number of comics I read in my whole life, and the Battle Chasers aren't the exception; though, if this upcoming game is being loyal to their style and tone, I have to say I would be more tempted to do so. Personally, I don't expect for games to have state-of-the-art technology behind their graphics, but I care a lot about the artistic design, and this one truly seems to deliver on that. Plus, if you check this news on the official site, after a successful Kickstarter campaign they announced to be completely funded by Nordic Games without sacrificing the creative control of the project, so basically the quality of the game now simply relies on how talented they are and how well they spend the budget on the game.

Games for GNU/Linux

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Gaming

Games for GNU/Linux

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Gaming
  • Feedback needed for our 'Linux Game Of The Year Award' that will start soon

    We've run a GOTY award for the last two years and this year will be no different! I am requesting feedback!

    The page is currently open, with the categories adjusted from last year: https://www.gamingonlinux.com/goty.php

    If you have a suggestion for a category, please let me know, but I don't want too many more as I think we already have a good selection going from feedback last year.

  • Valve seems to have removed the SteamPlay logo from Steam

    Something that didn't go unnoticed was that Valve has removed the SteamPlay logo from Steam store pages.

    This is interesting, as it was a partial source of confusion amongst SteamOS/Linux gamers. Plenty of us know how to easily identify games that have Linux support, but there was plenty who didn't. People were genuinely getting confused about it all and I don't blame them.

  • 2016 Holiday Gift Ideas For Linux Enthusiasts, Gamers

    If you are looking for any gift ideas this 2016 holiday season for a Linux gamer/enthusiast or just a casual user looking for some friendly PC hardware, here are my favorites for this holiday season.

  • Vendetta Online 1.8.398 MMORPG Adds Better Game Controller Support for Gear VR

    Guild Software announced a new update to their cross-platform, multiplayer Vendetta Online 1.8 MMORPG, versioned 1.8.398, which ships only a few days after the 1.8.397 maintenance update.

    As you might imagine, Vendetta Online 1.8.398 is a small patch addressing various issues reported by users from the previous point release, but also adding significant improvements to analog stick sensitivity for various game controllers made by Razer, Moga, SteelSeries, and Nyko, when playing the game with the Samsung Gear VR headset.

Open Source Virtual Reality (OSVR) and Steam

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Gaming

Games for GNU/Linux

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Gaming
  • The Final Station Post-Apocalyptic 2D Side-Scrolling Shooter Out Now on Linux

    On Thanksgiving day, Russian developer Do My Best Games was proud to announce the availability of the Linux port of their post-apocalyptic train simulator and zombie shooter game, The Final Station.

    Developed by Do My Best Games and published by tinyBuild Games the game was launched on the 30th of August 2016 on Valve's Steam gaming distribution platform, but only for Windows and Mac operating systems.

  • My top list of must-have strategy games on Linux as of right now

    Are you a new Linux gamer wondering what strategy games we have? Or perhaps you’re just in the mood for something new! Here’s my current top list of Linux strategy games.

  • 'The Final Station' released on Linux

    I'm very glad to see that after a long journey, The Final Station has finally arrived at the Linux platform, with a hefty discount this Autumn Steam Sale.

    The game is very atmospheric and the story reminds me of works by Zajdel and Strugatsky brothers. The nostalgia of the dying world and the inevitability of moving forward, even at the price of leaving something or someone behind really spoke to me. But don't take my word for it, go and experience it on your own!

Games for GNU/Linux

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Gaming

Games for GNU/Linux

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GNU
Linux
Gaming

Steam Gains OSVR Support, Cheaper Games

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Games for GNU/Linux

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Gaming
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