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Gaming

Leftovers: Software and Games

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Software
Gaming
  • Best Linux remote desktop clients: Top 5 RDC in 2017

    This article was provided to TechRadar by Linux Format, the number one magazine to boost your knowledge on Linux, open source developments, distro releases and much more. Subscribe to the print or digital version of Linux Format here.

    SSH has been the staple remote access tool for the sysadmins since its advent. The cryptographic network protocol is synonymous with remote network services over an unsecured network. Admins use SSH to mount remote directories, backup remote servers, spring-clean remote databases, and even forward X11 connections. The popularity of single-board computers, such as the Raspberry Pi, has introduced SSH into the parlance of the everyday desktop users as well.

  • A Powerful Dual-Pane File Manager `Double Commander` New Update for Ubuntu/Linux Mint

    Double Commander is a powerful open source & cross platform file manager, inspired from total commander file manager but includes new ideas and features. It brings dual pane side by side experience to enhance the use of GUI for the user. The main window of the application is separated by two panels side by side that allow you to view the content of two different location or same and browse through folders with ease. For each file, image or folder, details such as name, extension, size, date and attributes are displayed in the list.

  • SoftMaker Office 2016 – Your alternative to LibreOffice?

    Depending on how you look at it, the world of office suites for Linux is either very rich or very poor. As the rather obscure idiom says: the tailor (hence the cliche suit reference) always goes naked. But in essence, you’re either using LibreOffice – used to be OpenOffice – or maybe something else. Probably nothing.

    However, there are quite a few office products for Linux: Kingsoft Office, SoftMaker Office, Calligra, standalone Abiword, some others, each offering a slightly different aesthetic and functional approach. We talked about this in the office suite competition article back in 2013, and a lot has changed since. LibreOffice finally became suitable for use side by side with Microsoft Office, as far as decent document conversion and fidelity go, and every one of these products has seen a large number of major and minor number increments. In the original piece, SoftMaker Office was kind of a dud, and it’s time to give it a full review. Let us.

  • Reports: PS4 is selling twice as well as Xbox One, overall [Ed: Xbox continues to be a loser]

    Microsoft stopped providing concrete sales data for its Xbox line years ago, making it hard to get a read on just how well the Xbox One is doing in the market compared to Sony's PlayStation 4. Recent numbers released by analysts this week, though, suggest that Sony continues to dominate this generation of the console wars, with the PS4 now selling twice as many units worldwide as the Xbox One since both systems launched in late 2013.

    The first set of numbers comes from a new SuperData report on the Nintendo Switch, which offhandedly mentions an installed base of 26 million Xbox One units and 55 million PS4 units. That report is backed up by Niko Partners analyst Daniel Ahmad, who recently tweeted a chart putting estimated Xbox One sales somewhere near the middle of the 25 million to 30 million range.

  • PPSSPP (PSP) Emulator 1.3.0 Version Released, Install in Ubuntu/Linux Mint

    PPSSPP is a PSP emulator written in C++, and translates PSP CPU instructions directly into optimized x86, x64 and ARM machine code, using JIT recompilers (dynarecs). PPSSPP is an open source project, licensed under the GPL. PPSSPP can run your PSP games on your PC in full HD resolution, it is cross-platform application. It can even upscale textures that would otherwise be too blurry as they were made for the small screen of the original PSP.

More Games

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Gaming

Games for GNU/Linux

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Gaming

More Games

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Gaming
  • Here's How To Setup Clear Linux For Intel Steam Linux Gaming

    A few weeks back we learned of Intel's Clear Linux distribution working towards Steam support. While Clear Linux is a performance-oriented workstation/server/cloud distribution, repeatedly in our tests it performs among the top Linux distributions even when it comes to Intel OpenGL Linux gaming, so being able to game with it isn't a far stretch with Steam support -- there is also Vulkan support now too.

    If you aren't familiar with Clear Linux for OpenGL/gaming performance, see some of our past tests like in Clear Linux With Mesa 13 Is A Strong Match For Intel Linux Performance or Clear Linux Continues To Have Graphics Performance Advantage Over Ubuntu. Clear Linux on Intel graphics systems can even outperform Ubuntu and other more popular desktop distribution alternatives. Though this is just for Linux gaming with Intel graphics -- AMD/NVIDIA graphics aren't currently supported by this Intel Open-Source Technology Center project.

  • Smartphone Game: Highway Traffic Rider game now available for free on Tizen Store

    Last year a motorbike riding game named Highway Traffic Rider was released on Tizen Store by Janos Barkoczi and copyright of ZipZap Games Kft. for ₹33. Now this game is available in the Tizen store for FREE. This is an awesome bike riding game, which has different types of missions & levels, different types of riding mode, different types of environments and different bikes for different levels. There are 3 missions in a level.

  • Wine Staging 2.0 RC5 Improves Support for Apps That Require Windows 7 or Vista

    The road to Wine 2.0 and Wine Staging 2.0 continues, and while the former already got its fifth Release Candidate (RC) development release at the end of last week, the latter yesterday received a new unstable build.

    That's right, we are talking here about Wine Staging 2.0 RC5, which comes hot on the heels of Wine 2.0 RC5 to add numerous goodies for those who want to run Windows apps and games on their Linux computers.

Games for GNU/Linux

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Gaming

Leftovers: Software and Games

Filed under
Software
Gaming

Games for GNU/Linux

Filed under
Gaming

Wine-Staging 2.0-RC5 and 'Squad' Might be Coming to GNU/Linux

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Gaming
  • Wine-Staging 2.0-RC5 Improves Compatibility For Origin, GOG Galaxy & More

    Wine-Staging 2.0-RC5 was released on Sunday as the newest version of this experimental/testing Wine build. This time around there are some exciting new patches.

    On top of re-basing off Friday's Wine 2.0-rc5 release and continuing to maintain quite a number of patches that haven't yet made their way into mainline Wine, a few more patches were added. Upstream Wine is currently under a code freeze until the 2.0 release later this month but that doesn't stop the Wine-Staging crew.

  • Release 2.0-rc5

    Wine Staging 2.0-rc5 improves the compatibility of various applications that require at least Windows Vista or Windows 7. This includes Origin, Uplay, GOG Galaxy and many more. Several bugs were fixed in the PE loader to support loading of packed executables with truncated headers and/or on-the-fly section decompression. If you are using the 64 bit version of Wine, you may also benefit from the memory manager improvements, which allow applications to reserve/allocate more than 32 GB of virtual memory. The memory allocations are now only constrained by resource limitations of the hardware / the operating system and no longer by an artificial design limit in Wine.

  • Looks like FPS game 'Squad' might be coming to Linux soon

    The game uses Unreal Engine and we know already how iffy their Linux support actually is. Hopefully they won't come across too many troubles.

Leftovers: Gaming

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Gaming
  • Linux market-share on Steam dropped 0.08% in December 2016

    Why is this important to know? Well, it's highly likely the amount of Linux users on Steam is growing, but it's probably dwarfed by Windows (and likely Mac too) growth at the same time so it brings down our market-share.

    Nothing to worry about, so if anyone writes about it like it's Linux gaming doomsday, don't believe them. It would be something to worry about if developers started coming along noticing a drop in sales from Linux, but not a single developer has said so.

    Keep buying Linux games, keep playing them on Linux and keep going. 2017 is going to be fun!

  • Streets of Rogue development build updated with NAT punch-through and automatic port forwarding
  • Setting up a retro gaming console at home

    Commodore 64 was the first computer I ever saw in 1989. Twice in a year I used to visit my grandparents’ house in Kolkata, I used to get one or two hours to play with it. I remember, after a few years how I tried to read a book on Basic, with the help of an English-to-Bengali dictionary. In 1993, my mother went for a year-long course for her job. I somehow managed to convince my father to buy me an Indian clone of NES (Little Master) in the same year. That was also a life event for me. I had only one game cartridge, only after 1996 the Chinese NES clones entered our village market.

  • Tasbot does Tasblock - Awesome Games Done Quick 2017 - Part 170 [Ed: NES mini uses Linux]

    This speedrun was recorded live at Awesome Games Done Quick 2017, a weeklong charity speedrun marathon raising money for Prevent Cancer Foundation. Awesome Games Done Quick 2017 is just one of the many charity marathons put on by Games Done Quick.

  • Wine 2.0-rc5 release, moving towards a final stable version
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More in Tux Machines

Security Leftovers

  • Someone is putting lots of work into hacking Github developers [Ed: Dan Goodin doesn't know that everything is under attack and cracking attempts just about all the time?]
    Open-source developers who use Github are in the cross-hairs of advanced malware that has steal passwords, download sensitive files, take screenshots, and self-destruct when necessary.
  • Security Orchestration and Incident Response
    Technology continues to advance, and this is all a changing target. Eventually, computers will become intelligent enough to replace people at real-time incident response. My guess, though, is that computers are not going to get there by collecting enough data to be certain. More likely, they'll develop the ability to exhibit understanding and operate in a world of uncertainty. That's a much harder goal. Yes, today, this is all science fiction. But it's not stupid science fiction, and it might become reality during the lifetimes of our children. Until then, we need people in the loop. Orchestration is a way to achieve that.

Leftover: Development (Linux)

  • Swan: Better Linux on Windows
    If you are a Linux user that has to use Windows — or even a Windows user that needs some Linux support — Cygwin has long been a great tool for getting things done. It provides a nearly complete Linux toolset. It also provides almost the entire Linux API, so that anything it doesn’t supply can probably be built from source. You can even write code on Windows, compile and test it and (usually) port it over to Linux painlessly.
  • Lint for Shell Scripters
    It used to be one of the joys of writing embedded software was never having to deploy shell scripts. But now with platforms like the Raspberry Pi becoming very common, Linux shell scripts can be a big part of a system–even the whole system, in some cases. How do you know your shell script is error-free before you deploy it? Of course, nothing can catch all errors, but you might try ShellCheck.
  • Android: Enabling mainline graphics
    Android uses the HWC API to communicate with graphics hardware. This API is not supported on the mainline Linux graphics stack, but by using drm_hwcomposer as a shim it now is. The HWC (Hardware Composer) API is used by SurfaceFlinger for compositing layers to the screen. The HWC abstracts objects such as overlays and 2D blitters and helps offload some work that would normally be done with OpenGL. SurfaceFlinger on the other hand accepts buffers from multiple sources, composites them, and sends them to the display.
  • Collabora's Devs Make Android's HWC API Work in Mainline Linux Graphics Stack
    Collabora's Mark Filion informs Softpedia today about the latest work done by various Collabora developers in collaboration with Google's ChromeOS team to enable mainline graphics on Android. The latest blog post published by Collabora's Robert Foss reveals the fact that both team managed to develop a shim called drm_hwcomposer, which should enable Android's HWC (Hardware Composer) API to communicate with the graphics hardware, including Android 7.0's version 2 HWC API.

today's howtos

Reports From and About Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF)