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Gaming

Leftovers: Games

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Gaming

Linux gaming rising: 7 big-name PC games that now call Linux home

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Linux
Gaming

Linux's gaming potential is about more than SteamOS and blockbuster ports. Earlier this year, GOG.com announced plans to bring a bevy of classic games to Ubuntu and Mint Linux this fall, with more than 100 games expected to be available at launch. Expect them to work just fine with SteamOS when the operating system finally launches sometime in 2015, too.

Speaking of Steam, it's not the big-name games but the indies that are driving Steam for Linux's true growth. After launching with a mere 60 native games just over a year ago, Steam for Linux now stands at more than 300 games strong—tremendous growth in a very short time. More and more games—like Europa Universalis IV, and Amnesia: A Machine for Pigs, and Dota 2, and Starbound—are starting to launch Linux versions alongside Windows counterparts.

It's still not quite the year of Linux on the desktop, but one thing's for certain: Linux's gaming prospects are looking brighter than ever before.

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Will Linux Ever Be Regarded as an Equal to Windows and Consoles at E3?

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GNU
Linux
Gaming

Linux is slowly becoming a gaming alternative, but it's still a long way from consoles and Windows. How long will it take to see Linux represented at the E3 Expo in full effect, just like all the other platforms?

Making predictions is very hard, especially about the future. This simple statement from physicist Niels Bohr explains very well why it's difficult to anticipate what will happen in the world of technology. Some things evolve faster than we can predict and others seem to stagnate...

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Leftovers: Gaming

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Gaming

Superb Interstellar Marines Tactical FPS Arrives on Steam for Linux

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Gaming

nterstellar Marines, a tactical FPS developed and published by Zero Point Software, has just received Linux support with the latest patch.

Interstellar Marines is a very promising first-person shooter and its developers said that they took inspiration from Half-Life, System Shock 2, and Rainbow Six 3: Raven Shield. The game has been built mainly as a multiplayer experience, but a limited single-player is also available.

The latest update for the Interstellar Marines also brought support for the Linux platform and it looks like this title aims to be one of the best-looking on the open source platform...

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Leftovers: Gaming

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Gaming

Unreal Engine 4.2 Brings 500+ Updates

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Gaming

The latest major update to Epic Games' Unreal Engine 4 was released this week and the Linux support has taken another step forward.

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Valve Funds Glassy Mesa Development For Better Driver Performance

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Gaming

Valve has funded work by LunarG on a project codenamed "Glassy Mesa" to deliver potential performance improvements on the open-source Mesa graphics driver stack.

Glassy Mesa is an experimental project using LunarGLASS for plugging LLVM into Mesa for shader compilation and run-time improvements. LunarGLASS originated back in 2010 as using LLVM IR as the base intermediate representation for the shader and kernel compiler stack. LunarGLASS has performance potential via taking advantage of LLVM's many optimization passes.

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Leftovers: Gaming

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Gaming

Valve improved X-Box gamepad driver for Fedora

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Red Hat
Gaming

I’ve added to the Steam package repository for Fedora an alternative kernel module for xpad, the X-Box gamepad driver. This variant contains patches created by Valve to improve the driver and its behaviour.

The module is available in both akmod (RPMFusion) and dkms package formats.

This made my 3rd party X-Box controller work without any issue in Steam games and in the Big Picture Mode interface!

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IPA Font license added to license list

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OpenForum Europe Challenges Governments to Walk the Open Format Walk

OpenForum Europe, an advocacy group focusing on IT openness in government, issued a press release earlier today announcing its launch of a new public Internet portal. At that site, anyone can report a government page that offers a document intended for collaborative use for downloading if that document is not available in an OpenDocument Format (ODF) compliant version. The portal is called FixMyDocuments.eu, and you can show your support for the initiative (as I have) by adding your name here (the first supporter listed is the EU's indominatable digital champion, Neelie Kroes). The announcement coincides with the beginning of another initiative, Global Legislative Openness Week, which will involve global activities annd "events hosted by the Legislative Openness Working Group of the Open Government Partnership and members of the parliamentary openness community." A full calendar of events is here. Read more

Nouveau For Linux 3.18 Gains DP Audio, More Re-Clocking

Ben Skeggs sent in his Nouveau DRM driver changes for the drm-next tree of open-source NVIDIA driver improvements that will land in Linux 3.18. With the DRM merge window now closing earlier in the cycle, David Airlie is cutting off new features for the next kernel merge window from landing into drm-next after -rc5 of the current kernel. Thus, this week is the cut-off for new DRM driver functionality aiming for Linux 3.18 with Linux 3.17-rc5 having been released. As such, Ben Skeggs sent in his big batch of Nouveau DRM improvements. Read more

With Android One, Google puts itself firmly back in the OS' driving seat

Under Android One, Google has developed its reference hardware designs — meaning OEMs no longer have to develop and test their own smartphones; they just pick up Google's ready-to-wear versions and get manufacturing. Google already has three local Indian smartphone makers signed up to do just that — Karbonn, Spice, and Micromax — all soon be be selling Google-designed, Android One-powered devices for around $100. Android One uses a stock version of Android, as seen on its Nexus products — meaning no UI customisation is possible — but Google has graciously offered to let OEMs and mobile operators add their own apps to handsets running the OS. The operators don't seem to mind the disintermediation much, and have teamed up with Google to launch Android One mobile plans to coincide with the launch of the new phones. Read more