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Free Software and Proprietary Games, Vivaldi

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Gaming
  • QEMU 2.6 Is Coming With Many Improvements

    QEMU 2.6-rc0 was tagged today as the first milestone leading up to the QEMU 2.6 release in the near future.

    QEMU 2.6 is bringing many ARM and MIPS improvements, support for new x86 CPU features, QEMU VFIO now supports AMD XGBE platform passthrough, performance improvements in VirtIO, SDL2 and SPICE now support OpenGL and VirGL, block device improvements, and more.

  • OpenToonz Animation Software Begins Seeing Linux Support

    Toonz is an animation software solution used by studios like Studio Ghibli and has been in development for more than two decades. Earlier this month it was announced Toonz would be open-sourced and then a few days back the code was published as OpenToonz. While Toonz/OpenToonz originally didn't have Linux support, patches are emerging to allow this high-end animation software to run on Linux.

  • Libav's libavcodec Adds New VA-API Encoders

    For those still relying upon the FFmpeg-forked libav project, their libavcodec code has added new VA-API encoder support.

    With the Video Acceleration API (VA-API) largely backed by Intel, the Libav code-base is supporting GPU-accelerated H.264 encoding and H.265/HEVC encoding.

  • Latest Steam Client Beta Adds Support for Steam Controller to OpenVR Games

    Just three days ago, we reported about the latest stable Steam Client update Valve pushed to Linux, Mac OS X, and Windows users, which brought numerous Steam Controller and SteamVR features, and now a new Beta version is out.

  • It Was Only 4 Years Ago That Many Thought Steam On Linux Was An April Fools' Day Joke

    While there are around two thousand Linux-native games now available on Steam brought over by many different studios, it was just four years ago that many thought Valve bringing Steam to Linux was a joke or far-fetched rumor.

    Today marks four years to the day since Gabe Newell had emailed us about Linux driver problems in their porting of Source Engine games to Linux as part of their initial Steam Linux bring-up. Many didn't believe it then, in part due to being close to April Fools' Day, and even when in 2012 I went out to Valve's HQ to talk with them about their Linux plans including what would become Steam Machines and SteamOS.

  • Vivaldi 1.0 Web Browser Is Just Around the Corner, Based on Chromium 49.0

    Vivaldi's Ruarí Ødegaard has announced earlier the release and immediate availability for testing of what appears to be one of the last snapshots before the final build of the upcoming Vivaldi 1.0 web browser.

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming

Leftovers: More on Gaming

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Leftovers: Gaming

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University students create award-winning open source projects

In my short time working for Clarkson University, I've realized what a huge impact this small university is making on the open source world. Our 4,300 student-strong science and technology-focused institution, located just south of the Canadian border in Potsdam, New York, hosts the Clarkson Open Source Institute (COSI), dedicated to promoting open source software and providing equipment and support for student projects. While many universities offer opportunities for students to get involved in open source projects, it's rare to have an entire institute dedicated to promoting open source development. COSI is part of Clarkson's Applied Computer Science Labs within the computer science department. It, along with the Internet Teaching Lab and the Virtual Reality Lab, is run by students (supported by faculty advisers), allowing them to gain experience in managing both facilities and projects while still undergraduates. Read more

Linux 4.17-rc2

So rc2 is out, and things look fairly normal. The diff looks a bit unusual, with the tools subdirectory dominating, with 30%+ of the whole diff. Mostly perf and test scripts. But if you ignore that, the rest looks fairly usual. Arch updates (s390 and x86 dominate) and drivers (networking, gpu, HID, mmc, misc) are the bulk of it, with misc other changes all over (filesystems, core kernel, networking, docs). We've still got some known fallout from the merge window, but it shouldn't affect most normal configurations, so go out and test. Linus Read more Also: Upstream Linux support for new NXP i.MX8