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Gaming

Several Great Linux Terminal Games

Filed under
Linux
Gaming

Standing for TINT Is Not Tetris, that’s exactly what it is. A terminal-based tetris clone with highscore saving and 9 levels. Among the tetris clones for Linux, TINT is one of my favorites. Use J to move pieces left, L to move them right, K to rotate and SPACE to accelerate. Press Q to quit. On Ubuntu at least, there seems to be a problem when saving highscores due to permissions not allowing it (Error creating /var/games/tint.scores). You can fix it by doing something like this: sudo touch /var/games/tint.scores && sudo chown $USER:$USER /var/games/tint.scores.

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Leftovers: Gaming

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Gaming

The Reason Some Games Are Delayed For Linux In Humble Indie Bundles

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Gaming

There is an "ask me anything" going on in reddit-land right now with the folks from the current Humble Bundle, I decided to ask the question a lot of people have been wondering.

[...]

I think it harms their reputation with Linux fans to have a game completely missing for the sake of what sounds like their egos.

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GNOME Sanity, FAQ, and Gaming Options

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GNOME
Gaming

Today's newsfeeds were bountiful indeed. Muktware is running a comparison of gaming option for us Linux users. The Register tested GNOME 3.12 and says it's looking sensible and sane. And Gary Newell has tried to answer the eternal question: "Is Linux right for me?" Today's post also includes several extras to keep you busy through the weekend too.

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A comparison of gaming options for Linux users

Filed under
Linux
Gaming

Linux gaming used to be a wasteland. The only options were simple open source games and the handful of commercial ports that could still be obtained. By comparison, the present day seems like a jungle some times, with more and more options emerging, and it can feel like a full time job keeping up on developments.

Today, we’ll take a brief look at the various options available to you, and what benefits and drawbacks you can run into. This isn’t meant to be completely exhaustive, but rather a good introduction, if you are new to Linux or to the concept of Linux gaming in general. As such, we’ll be covering four primary sources.

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Leftovers: Games News

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Gaming

Steam's Linux game count explodes in one year, big publishers still absent

Filed under
Linux
Gaming

Since Valve released the first stable version of Steam for Linux a year ago, the number of Linux-supported games has grown more than fivefold.

Valve's digital game distribution service now hosts 333 games for Linux, compared to 60 games last February. (Strangely, Steam's store page claims that 541 games are now available, but when you search the entire catalog it shows only 333 titles. We've asked Valve for clarification.)

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Steam OS, client update brings audio improvements

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Debian
Gaming

Valve has pushed yet another update to its stable version which brings many audio related improvements. Some of the GNU/Linux client and Steam OS related improvements include addition of “an auto-detect step for audio outputs when booting SteamOS for the first time. You can change the selected output device using the Audio option under settings,” according to changelog.

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Leftovers: Games News

Filed under
Gaming

Leftovers: Games News

Filed under
Linux
Gaming
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today's leftovers

Linux Development and LinuxCon

  • Linus Torvalds says GPL was defining factor in Linux's success
    Linus Torvalds and Dirk Hohndel, vice president and chief of open source at VMware, discussed the role that GNU GPL played in the success of Linux during a keynote conversation this week at LinuxCon NA in Toronto. Hohndel, who has been involved with the kernel for a very long time, said that during the past 25 years there have been many challenges, and one of the biggest challenges was the possibility of fragmentation. "How do we keep one single kernel?" he asked. "I used to be worried about fragmentation, and I used to think that it was inevitable at some point," said Torvalds. “Everyone was looking at the history of Linux and comparing it with UNIX. People would say that it’s going to fail because it's going to fragment. That's what happened before, so why even bother?" What made the difference was the license. "FSF [Free Software Foundation] and I don't have a loving relationship, but I love GPL v2," said Torvalds. "I really think the license has been one of the defining factors in the success of Linux because it enforced that you have to give back, which meant that the fragmentation has never been something that has been viable from a technical standpoint."
  • Making Use Of eBPF In The Mainline Linux Kernel
    One of the exciting innovations within the Linux kernel in the past few years has been extending the Berkeley Packet Filter (BPF) to become a more generalized in-kernel virtual machine. The eBPF work with recent versions of the Linux kernel allow it to be used by more than just networking so that these programs can be used for tracing, security, and more.
  • Linux turns 25 with a brilliant history
    Chances are, you use it every day. Linux runs every Android phone and tablet on Earth. And even if you’re on an iPhone or a Mac or a Windows machine, Linux is working behind the scenes, across the Internet, serving up most of the webpages you view and powering most of the apps you use. Facebook, Google, Pinterest, Wikipedia—it’s all running on Linux. Now, Linux is finding its way onto televisions, thermostats, and even cars. As software creeps into practically every aspect of our lives, so does the OS designed by Linus Torvalds.
  • Intel Lost Another Open-Source Driver Developer To Google Earlier This Summer
    There was another long-time Intel open-source Linux graphics driver developer that left the company earlier this summer and is now working at Google on the Chrome/Chromium OS graphics stack. Among the notable departures in the past few months from Intel's Open-Source Technology Center were Jesse Barnes, Wayland-founder Kristian Høgsberg, and Dirk Hohndel and apparently others that went under the radar or outside of our area of focus. Another graphics driver developer no longer at Intel is Chad Versace.
  • OpenGL ES 3.1 For Haswell Lands With Intel's Mesa Driver