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Gaming

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming

Leftovers: Games

Filed under
Gaming

Newell on Source 2, CS:GO Linux and... Ricochet 2

Filed under
Linux
Gaming

Valve boss Gabe Newell has concluded his Reddit AMA (conducted to support the fundraising effort Valve is doing for the Seattle Children's Hospital), and in the process has offered a few snippets of information on what the company is up to.

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Also: Counter-Strike: Global Offensive coming to Linux, says Newell

WINE and Linux gaming

Filed under
Linux
Software
Gaming

While many developers are jumping on board with Linux, odds are that porting their old titles is not likely to occur, whether due to cost, resources or perceived lack of interest. This issue can be solved by either “going native”, only running software that is available natively for Linux, or by employing an option such as Wine to get it to run under Linux. Another option includes virtualization, but that is beyond the scope of this article.

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Leftovers: Games

Filed under
Gaming

Steam Family Sharing now open to public

Filed under
Software
Gaming

The announcement came over the Steam Community Boards, where it was announced that the Family Sharing feature is now available to the general public. Through this feature, a single user can share his/her entire Steam Library with up to five family members over ten different devices. Once the members are authorized, they can play any or all of the game through their own accounts. The achievements, saves and other related records achieved by the gamer will be tied to the gamer’s individual account using cloud saves.

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Steam Hardware Survey Changes, Now Split Per-Platform

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Gaming

So, to look back on January Linux was actually on 1.34%, not 1.11%!

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Linux Gamers Have More Choices Than Ever

Filed under
Linux
Gaming

After a number of years of remaining woefully behind other platforms, Linux is starting to be a gaming platform to take seriously. Late last year, I covered comments from Lars Gustavsson, a creative director for EA Digital Illusions CE (DICE), the Electronic Arts studio that does the Battlefield series, on the topic of Linux games. He had told Polygon that DICE would love to delve into Linux games, and that what Linux really needs is a "killer game." Now, as 2014 is underway, Linux gamers actually have a lot of good choices.

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Do Linux gamers have too many options now?

Filed under
Linux
Gaming

My feeling is that the answer is clearly no, and frankly it's very refreshing for Linux gamers to have different options at all. I remember the days when it was very hard to find games for Linux and I'd never want to go back to that. Ever. It was a miserable time if you used Linux and wanted to play games.

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Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming
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University fuels NextCloud's improved monitoring

Encouraged by a potential customer - a large, German university - the German start-up company NextCloud has improved the resource monitoring capabilities of its eponymous cloud services solution, which it makes available as open source software. The improved monitoring should help users scale their implementation, decide how to balance work loads and alerting them to potential capacity issues. NextCloud’s monitoring capabilities can easily be combined with OpenNMS, an open source network monitoring and management solution. Read more

Linux Kernel Developers on 25 Years of Linux

One of the key accomplishments of Linux over the past 25 years has been the “professionalization” of open source. What started as a small passion project for creator Linus Torvalds in 1991, now runs most of modern society -- creating billions of dollars in economic value and bringing companies from diverse industries across the world to work on the technology together. Hundreds of companies employ thousands of developers to contribute code to the Linux kernel. It’s a common codebase that they have built diverse products and businesses on and that they therefore have a vested interest in maintaining and improving over the long term. The legacy of Linux, in other words, is a whole new way of doing business that’s based on collaboration, said Jim Zemlin, Executive Director of The Linux Foundation said this week in his keynote at LinuxCon in Toronto. Read more

Car manufacturers cooperate to build the car of the future

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Torvalds at LinuxCon: The Highlights and the Lowlights

On Wednesday, when Linus Torvalds was interviewed as the opening keynote of the day at LinuxCon 2016, Linux was a day short of its 25th birthday. Interviewer Dirk Hohndel of VMware pointed out that in the famous announcement of the operating system posted by Torvalds 25 years earlier, he had said that the OS “wasn’t portable,” yet today it supports more hardware architectures than any other operating system. Torvalds also wrote, “it probably never will support anything other than AT-harddisks.” Read more