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Gaming

Do Linux gamers have too many options now?

Filed under
Linux
Gaming

My feeling is that the answer is clearly no, and frankly it's very refreshing for Linux gamers to have different options at all. I remember the days when it was very hard to find games for Linux and I'd never want to go back to that. Ever. It was a miserable time if you used Linux and wanted to play games.

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Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming

Reven meets Kickstarter Goal, headed for Linux

Filed under
Linux
Gaming

Reven recently announced the team has reached its Kickstarter funding goal, bringing some more awesome 2D platformer goodness to the Linux platform. Varia games also plans on bringing the title to OS X, as well as the Wii U. Monthly updates are planned to be broadcast on the popular gaming video platform, Twitch.tv. A public demo and eta keys should show up in the next few months.

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The Humble Indie Bundle 11

Filed under
Linux
Gaming

Welcome again, it's time for a brand new Humble Indie Bundle.... The Humble Indie Bundle 11 is here!

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Stencyl 3.0 Released, A Game Creation Kit With No Programming

Filed under
Software
Gaming

Stencyl is an interesting toolkit that enables you to create games without traditional programming, and they have just released the big 3.0.

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QBEH-1: The Atlas Cube Atmospheric First Person Puzzle Game Releasing In April For Linux

Filed under
Linux
Gaming

Digital Tribes got in touch with us recently to get the word out about QBEH-1: The Atlas Cube the prequel to QBEH a game which sadly has no Linux version, but this one will.

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Several Great Linux Terminal Games

Filed under
Linux
Gaming

Standing for TINT Is Not Tetris, that’s exactly what it is. A terminal-based tetris clone with highscore saving and 9 levels. Among the tetris clones for Linux, TINT is one of my favorites. Use J to move pieces left, L to move them right, K to rotate and SPACE to accelerate. Press Q to quit. On Ubuntu at least, there seems to be a problem when saving highscores due to permissions not allowing it (Error creating /var/games/tint.scores). You can fix it by doing something like this: sudo touch /var/games/tint.scores && sudo chown $USER:$USER /var/games/tint.scores.

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Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming

The Reason Some Games Are Delayed For Linux In Humble Indie Bundles

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Gaming

There is an "ask me anything" going on in reddit-land right now with the folks from the current Humble Bundle, I decided to ask the question a lot of people have been wondering.

[...]

I think it harms their reputation with Linux fans to have a game completely missing for the sake of what sounds like their egos.

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GNOME Sanity, FAQ, and Gaming Options

Filed under
GNOME
Gaming

Today's newsfeeds were bountiful indeed. Muktware is running a comparison of gaming option for us Linux users. The Register tested GNOME 3.12 and says it's looking sensible and sane. And Gary Newell has tried to answer the eternal question: "Is Linux right for me?" Today's post also includes several extras to keep you busy through the weekend too.

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More in Tux Machines

CORD becomes a Linux Foundation project

Central Office Re-architected as a Data Center (CORD), an open source integrated solutions platform for service providers leveraging merchant silicon, white boxes, and open source platforms such as Open Network Operating System (ONOS), OpenStack, Docker, and the cloud operating system XOS, is now part of the Linux Foundation as a new independent project. The Linux foundation is already home to many open source networking projects, including OpenDaylight and ONOS, so CORD is a natural fit for the non-profit foundation. Read more

Google beefs Linux up kernel defenses in Android

Future versions of Android will be more resilient to exploits thanks to developers' efforts to integrate the latest Linux kernel defenses into the operating system. Android's security model relies heavily on the Linux kernel that sits at its core. As such, Android developers have always been interested in adding new security features that are intended to prevent potentially malicious code from reaching the kernel, which is the most privileged area of the operating system. Read more

Fork YOU! Sure, take the code. Then what?

There's an old adage in the open source world – if you don't like it, fork it. This advice, often given in a flippant manner, makes it seem like forking a piece of software is not a big deal. Indeed, forking a small project you find on GitHub is not a big deal. There's even a handy button to make it easy to fork it. Unlike many things in programming though, that interaction model, that simplicity of forking, does not scale. There is no button next to Debian that says Fork it! Thinking that all you need to do to make a project yours is to fork it is a fundamental misunderstanding of what large free/open source projects are – at their hearts, they are communities. One does not simply walk into Debian and fork it. One can, on the other hand, walk out of a project, bring all the other core developers along, and essentially leave the original an empty husk. This is what happened when LibreOffice forked away from the once-mighty OpenOffice; it's what happened when MariaDB split from MySQL; and it's what happened more recently when the core developers behind ownCloud left the company and forked the code to start their own project, Nextcloud. They also, thankfully, dropped the silly lowercase first letter thing. Nextcloud consists of the core developers who built ownCloud, but who were not, and, judging by the very public way this happened, had not been, in control of the direction of the product for some time. Read more

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