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Gaming

Leftovers: Software and Games

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Software
Gaming

Windows 10 vs. Ubuntu Linux Gaming Performance With NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1060/1080

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Gaming

It's been a while since last testing Windows 10 vs. Linux on different, newer Linux game ports with a variety of GPUs, but that changed this week. As mentioned this weekend, I've been working on a large, fresh Windows vs. Linux gaming performance comparison. The results available today are for NVIDIA with testing a GeForce GTX 1060 and GTX 1080 on Windows 10 Pro x64 and Ubuntu 16.10 x86_64 with the latest drivers and using a variety of newer Direct3D 11/12 / OpenGL / Vulkan games.

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Games for GNU/Linux

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Gaming

The Best Operating System for Linux Gaming: Which One Do You Use and Why?

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GNU
Linux
Gaming

In the last few months, we tried multiple GNU/Linux distributions for gaming purposes, and we have arrived at the conclusion that there's no perfect operating system out there designed for Linux gaming.

We all know that the world of gaming is split between Nvidia and AMD users. Now, if you're using a Nvidia graphics card, even one from five years ago, chances are it's supported on most Linux-based operating systems because Nvidia provides up-to-date video drivers for most, if not all of its GPUs.

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Games for GNU/Linux

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Gaming
  • 'The Dweller' is a short and minimalistic but incredibly fun and solid puzzler that I highly recommend

    The Dweller is one of those obscure games that for some reason, despite being well made and original they pass completely unnoticed under the radar, and once you finally play them you not only feel you've spent a couple of hours on a worthy title, but also the fact itself of finding them is totally rewarding.

  • Gunmetal Arcadia released with same-day Linux support

    With so many releases lately, it’s a little hard to keep up with things sometimes. J. Kyle Pittman, creator of Super Win the Game, released his latest game earlier in the week and it combines colorful retro visuals with tightly precise gameplay.

  • Typoman: Revised released for Linux, a puzzle platformer with some word puzzling mixed in

    An indie puzzle platformer, where you must control the world around you with words, by the name of Typoman: Revised has made its way onto Linux via Steam.

    Typoman: Revised is a quite interesting puzzle platformer, where you control a character in a dark and dangerous world. To survive you need to rely on your ability to change the world around you by organizing letters you find into words, which have a physical effect on various aspects of the environment. For example, you can turn on various machinery by forming the word ”ON” or drop down a ladder by forming the word ”DOWN”. Finding the right letters and then figuring out which exact word will help you in any given scenario is fundamentally part of the puzzles.

Wine and Games

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GNU
Linux
Gaming
  • Wine Staging 2.1 Adds Improvements to the CSMT Patchset, Based on Wine 2.1

    The Wine Staging team announced today, February 9, 2017, the availability of the Wine Staging 2.1, a development release that implements various improvements and addresses numerous issues.

    Coming hot on the heels of Wine 2.1, on which it's based, the Wine Staging 2.1 release has revamped the CSMT (Command Stream Multithreading) patchset, which is the application's number one functionality, used for using the available GPU (Graphics Processing Unit) and CPU (Central Processing Unit) more efficiently by moving the execution of OpenGL commands to a separate thread, to support Direct3D 10 and 11.

  • Old School RTS Make a Comeback (on Linux too)

    We had already mentioned that Cossacks would be coming on Linux – it’s been on Windows since last year (2016) and for a long time we had no news about when it would appear on Linux, but it seems now that the date is fixed – it will be released on the 15th of March 2017 both on Mac and Linux.

  • Civilization VI: Quick Port Report

    So Civ VI should be out now by the time you read this, and we have had a couple of days on the beta before the release. After spending about 4 hours on the game, it’s wayyyyyy too early to have any definitive opinion about how good Civ VI really is (and what the additions of districts, civics tree and envoys actually bring), but we can at least say how good the port looks so far, in single-player mode. First, the first thing you will notice is the first, dark loading screen – at least during the first load. It’s been quite long on my hardware (i5 3.4 Ghz with GTX970, 8GB RAM, 1080p screen), more than a minute – it reminds me a lot of Mankind Divided in that sense. Note that this is not unique to Civ VI, Civ V had a pretty long loading screen as well. But once the game is loaded it’s about it, so it’s not that bad. And subsequent loads were shorter.

Leftovers: Games

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Gaming

GNU/Linux Release of Civilization VI and Performance Tests (Benchmarks)

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GNU
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
Gaming
  • Linux Release Of Civilization VI Comes With A Few Caveats

    Linux gamers got some great news this morning when Civilization VI finally debuted on the Penguin-loving platform. But, as the day progresses, those same gamers are finding out more and more that has made some regret their purchase.

  • Trying Intel Kabylake Graphics With Civilization VI On Ubuntu Linux

    I was very surprised to find out that I was able to get Intel HD Graphics working with Aspyr Media's latest Linux game port, Civilization VI. Here are some benchmark results.

    Aspyr Media only lists NVIDIA graphics as officially supported, but I couldn't resist trying out the latest-generation Intel Kabylake graphics for this game. Yesterday I posted 14-way NVIDIA benchmarks of Civilization 6 on Linux while my RadeonSI results are coming up shortly...

  • RadeonSI Performance For Civilization VI On Linux With Mesa 17.1 + 4.10 Kernel

    Since yesterday's release of Civilization VI for Linux, ported by Aspyr Media, we have published a 14-way NVIDIA GPU comparison with this newest high-profile Linux game release. This morning I also shared some Intel Kabylake game figures for Civilization 6 while now the focus is on RadeonSI.

  • Trying Nouveau NVC0 Gallium3D With Civilization 6 On Mesa 17.1

    With Intel Kabylake graphics on Mesa working (albeit very slowly) for Aspyr Media's latest Linux game port, Civilization VI, and RadeonSI Gallium3D running too albeit at a less than desirable speed, I decided to try running the open-source NVIDIA (Nouveau) driver with this latest AAA Linux game release.

    I tried Nouveau NVC0 Gallium3D from Mesa 17.1-devel Git this morning. I was running the Linux 4.10 kernel and had enabled NvBoost=2 mode and re-clocked the graphics card to its 0f performance state. The NVIDIA graphics card for this open-source driver testing was the GeForce GTX 780 Ti Kepler.

Games for GNU/Linux

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Gaming

Games for GNU/Linux

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Gaming
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Android Leftovers

New/Imminent Releases: Black Lab Linux, Exton|Defender, Mageia

  • Black Lab Linux 8.1 Released
    Today we are pleased to announce the release of Black Lab Linux 8.1. Our first incremental release to the 8.0 series. In this release we have brought all security updates up to Feb 15, 2017 as well as application updates.
  • Exton|Defender Super Rescue System Is Now Based on Fedora 25 and Cinnamon 3.2.8
    GNU/Linux developer Arne Exton is announcing the availability of a new build of his Exton|Defender SRS (Super Rescue System) Live DVD/USB designed for those who want to do various administrative tasks on their PCs. Based on the 64-bit version of the Fedora 25 operating system, Exton|Defender SRS Build 170218 comes with up-to-date tools that let you administrate and repair your operating system after a disaster. It's now powered by the Linux 4.9.9 kernel and uses the gorgeous Cinnamon 3.2.8 desktop environment by default.
  • Mageia 6 Has Been Running Months Behind Schedule, But It's Still Coming
    Samuel Verschelde of the Mandrake/Mandriva-forked Mageia Linux distribution has put out a blog post concerning the state of Mageia 6. The last Mageia 6 test release was in June of last year and their next Mageia 6 "stabilization snapshot" has been repeatedly delayed for months.
  • So where is Mageia 6?
    There is no mystery about it, we are totally off schedule. The last preview we published for Mageia 6 was Stabilization Snapshot 1 in June 2016, and Stabilization Snapshot 2 still hasn’t been published, although we have been saying “soon” for weeks, or even months! So what’s going on? Is Mageia dead? Fortunately not. But it’s good that you worry about it because it shows you like your Linux distribution. We need to communicate about the state of things so that you can stop worrying, so here we are.

5 Signs That Show You’re a Linux Geek

While Linux is certainly very easy to use, there are some activities surrounding it that are seen as more complex than others. While they can be all be avoided easily enough, they do have a certain, geeky appeal. How many of them do you follow? Read more

Top 5 best rising Linux distros in 2017

Linux is built for tinkering and experimentation, which means it’s always morphing and changing. New distros are popping up all the time, because all it takes is a little bit of determination, time and effort to create a custom operating system. Not all of them hit the mark – there are stacks of Linux distros that have seen little to no action, and we’re almost certain that some have been released and never installed by anyone other than their creator. Other alternative distros, though, fare rather better. Look at the success of Linux Mint, which spun off from Ubuntu to become (at times) arguably more popular than its own parent. Indeed, Ubuntu itself grew from Debian, and its niche offshoots (distros like Ubuntu Studio) have seen good movement. If there’s a market out there for your distro, there’s traction to be had. So let’s look at our pick of the five distros moving up swiftly through the ranks as of early 2017. Some of these might become the best Linux distros out there, some might turn out to be awful – but it won’t cost you a penny to try them out. Read more