Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Gaming

Games: GOG, Underworld Ascendant on GNU/Linux and Monster Sanctuary

Filed under
Gaming
  • GOG adds a bunch of new visual novels to their store

    For those of you who love your visual novels, head on over to GOG as they have some new goodies for you. One of them only just recently got Linux support too.

  • The RPG 'Underworld Ascendant' will be on Linux 1-2 months after release

    OtherSide Entertainment sadly won't be getting the Linux version of Underworld Ascendant on Linux at release.

    It's still coming though, it just needs a little more time. On Twitter, they mentioned "the Mac and Linux versions around 30-45 days after launch to make sure they have the attention they need". They also said they're looking for testers, so naturally we've reached out to let them know we're available.

  • Monster taming metroidvania 'Monster Sanctuary' has smashed plenty of stretch goals, looking good

    Monster Sanctuary, a rather interesting monster taming metroidvania that has a Linux demo has smashed through more stretch goals on Kickstarter and it's exciting.

    I've actually put a surprising amount of time in demo, because it runs so nicely. It's also a very promising game when it comes to the actual gameplay and mechanics. Honestly, I'm really surprised by just how engrossing and exciting the game actually is from the demo. It's going to be seriously fun to watch this one get developed into a full game, I have high hopes for it.

Games: Dead Dungeon, Eons of War, DELTARUNE

Filed under
Gaming
  • Dead Dungeon is a hardcore platformer for those who like a challenge

    Dead Dungeon from developer Alexey Roenko just recently released and it's pretty good, one for those who love a bit of difficult platforming.

  • Eons of War, a space 4x strategy game inspired by Risk, Civilization, and chess will be on Linux

    For those who are keen for some more 4x strategy game, Eons of War looks great and it will come to Linux.

    A recent discovery while endlessly browsing for new Linux games, I sent off a message via internet carrier pigeon (Twitter) to the developer about Linux support. Their reply was great "Yes, definitely supporting Linux as well as Mac and Windows. There's enough interest for all three platforms.".

  • DELTARUNE, the successor to UNDERTALE, unofficially ported to Linux

    The surprise successor to the highly praised indie RPG adventure game UNDERTALE called DELTARUNE has been unofficially ported to Linux by a fan through clever hacks.

    DELTARUNE, or rather its first chapter, was released with a cryptic announcement on http://www.deltarune.com for free on Windows and Mac but a Linux version was sadly not released at launch. However, thanks to a DELTARUNE fan on Reddit, we now have unofficial native port of the game.

    The Reddit user JohnWatson78 posted their port on the DELTARUNE subreddit and afterwards updated their post with instructions on how they managed to make the game run on Linux.

    Essentially, they extracted the officially released version of the game, made sure the files were in the correct places and in lowercase letters and found a compatible GameMaker "runner" executable that could then load the game assets. The main issue was finding a suitable runner file by browsing existing Linux GameMaker ports. You can naturally find the more detailed step-by-step guide in JohnWatson78's Reddit post.

Games: Eastward, Night of the Blood Moon, Heart Chain Kitty

Filed under
Gaming

Games: Crusader Kings II: Holy Fury, Humble Dystopian Bundle, Steam Play, DreamHack Atlanta 2018 and Wine

Filed under
Gaming
  • Crusader Kings II: Holy Fury smites its way to release, some thoughts

    Dealing with all things related to faith and righteous violence, the latest expansion to the venerable medieval strategy title has spiced things up considerably.

  • The Humble Dystopian Bundle is out with some nice Linux games included

    For those of you after some fresh games, The Humble Dystopian Bundle is out and it includes a couple good Linux titles.

    For the PWYW (Pay what you want) tier you will get Beholder and Orwell: Keeping an Eye On You. If you pay more than the current average then Orwell: Ignorance is Strength is yours.

  • Valve has expanded the Steam Play whitelist to include DARK SOULS III and plenty more

    There I am, in bed about to fall asleep when my phone lights up as I forgot to put it on silent. Thankfully so, as it turns out Valve just expanded the Steam Play whitelist and that's always a bit exciting.

    What is the whitelist? These are titles that Valve are confident enough that work out of the box with no additional configuration required. You don't need to turn any extra options on, they should just be click and play like any other Linux game on Steam.

  • Talk to us about open source gaming at DreamHack Atlanta 2018

    Red Hat is excited to sponsor our first esports event, DreamHack Atlanta on November 16-18, 2018. DreamHack is the world’s premier esports festival that celebrates the lifestyle of the gamer, and Red Hat will be there to sponsor a number of activities and provide a technical support booth for attendees who want to talk about gaming on open source platforms.

    Wait, Red Hat and esports? How do those go together?

    The majority of Internet infrastructure runs on Linux. The game servers, the streaming media servers, websites, and other infrastructure that powers online gaming? Much of that is powered by Linux. And Indie games are making a huge push to open source as well. We want to support that, because more open source is always a good thing!

  • Wine 3.0.4 Is En Route With New Icons, Dozens Of Bug Fixes

    Wine 4.0 should be out in early 2019 as the next major stable release of this increasingly used software for running Windows games and applications on Linux and other operating systems. For those not riding the bi-weekly development releases that lead up to the eventual Wine 4.0, Wine 3.0.4 is coming in the days ahead as the latest stable point revision.

    Wine stable point releases tend to be focused just on maintenance/bug/regression fixes, but Wine 3.0.4 will be a bit visibly different in that many Shell32 icons are added to this update. Dozens of Shell32 icons from the Zip and Jaz drive icons to 314k floppy drive icons to the start menu are bundled in Wine 3.0.4.

Games: Latest Titles Available for GNU/Linux

Filed under
Gaming

Latest Games for GNU/Linux

Filed under
Gaming
  • Little Misfortune is a sweet looking adventure, should hopefully get Linux support

    From the same developer who made Fran Bow (which supports Linux), Little Misfortune is what they're calling an interactive story. With a focus on exploration and the characters, including sweet and dark elements with choices that have consequences.

    With that in mind, when I spoke to the developer in regards to a Linux build they said "We will try to have it, yes! :)". Not solid, but a very positive response especially since they've supported Linux before.

  • Luna and the Moonling is a sweet puzzle game that's now available on Linux

    Luna and the Moonling from Greyborn Studios is a colourful puzzle game with an aim to put a new spin on block-pushing puzzle gameplay. Note: Key provided by the developer.

    For those who aren't aware, some of the people from Greyborn Studios previously worked on some pretty major titles like System Shock 2, Thief, Skylanders, Red Faction and quite a few more.

    "From the moment we released in early access last year we’ve had requests from Linux gamers to support the platform," said Michael Ryan, CTO & Technical Director of Greyborn Studios. "We’re big fans of the platform ourselves and were happy to oblige. We really hope Linux users enjoy the game, and welcome them to the Greyborn community," Ryan said.

  • Odd Realm is a sandbox settlement builder inspired by Dwarf Fortress and Rimworld with Linux support
  • Valve gave out more details about Artifact, including some public APIs and pre-order is up

    Artifact, the multi-lane card game from Valve is closing in on release and so Valve have given out a bunch of new details on what to expect.

    Firstly, it's now up for pre-order on Steam for £15.99/$20 and for that price you will get 10 card packs, 5 event tickets, and two complete starter decks. Considering how much such packs cost for real-life card games, that price is actually quite reasonable I think. Additional packs of cards will be $1.99, each pack has 12 random cards. You will also be able to buy and sell cards on the Steam Market.

  • Zeon 25, a retro-inspired hardcore shoot 'em up is now in Early Access

    The Doom-inspired UI bar along the bottom looked quite amusing, haven't really seen many games do something like that in recent years. Looks like it could be worth a shot, the action looks intense enough to keep me interested for sure.

    While it's in Early Access, they're hoping to add a co-op mode along with new maps, new enemies, new levels and so on. The full release is currently scheduled for Q1 2019 although that may change depending on how much feedback they get during development.

  • Neuroslicers is a narrative driven, online competitive cyberpunk RTS that will have Linux support

    Neuroslicers from developer Dream Harvest seems like a very interesting title. A narrative driven, online competitive cyberpunk RTS and it will be coming to Linux.

  • Feral Interactive have put out the system requirements for Total War: WARHAMMER II, due on Linux this month

    Ready your swords and your axe as Total War: WARHAMMER II is heading to Linux this month and Feral Interactive have now put up the system requirements.

  • Here's What You Need to Play Total War: WARHAMMER II on Linux and macOS

    UK based video games publisher Feral Interactive revealed today the official system requirements of the Total War: WARHAMMER II video game for Linux and Mac systems.

    In mid-June, Feral Interactive teased Linux and Mac gamers with the upcoming release of the Total War: WARHAMMER II port for their beloved platforms, the sequel to the critically acclaimed Total War: WARHAMMER video game released more than two years ago. The company said that the Linux and macOS port is coming in November.

    Well, November is here, and now Feral Interactive has revealed the official system requirements for playing the Total War: WARHAMMER II video game on Linux and macOS-powered computers, saying that the port will be available on these two platforms later this month.

  • Warhammer: Vermintide 2 ‘Back to Ubersreik’ DLC Remasters Three Maps From The First Game

    Warhammer: Vermintide 2, Fatshark’s first person rat-murdering action game, will be getting another DLC next month. The Back to Ubersreik DLC takes players to the setting of the first Vermintide game, and will feature remasters of three maps seen in the original Vermintide.

  • Dungeon crawler Ebony Spire: Heresy has a rather nice Anniversary Update that's worth a look

    After managing to sell a few thousand copies, the dungeon crawler Ebony Spire: Heresy has a great update now available.

    For those who missed the story, the developer Bearded Giant Games initially failed to really get anywhere with the game. They wrote a post on Gamasutra about it, where they said it had been a "a soul crushing experience". A pretty sobering reading, as game development has become so much harder in the past few years with stores being flooded with new games. Anyway, many months later they managed to hit over 6,000 sales and so this update is a thank you for keeping the developer going.

Games: Don't Starve, Long Dark and Hazelnut Bastille

Filed under
Gaming

DXVK 0.92

Filed under
Gaming
  • DXVK 0.92 is out with fixes for LA Noire, Shadow of the Tomb Raider and more

    DXVK, the excellent Vulkan-based D3D11 and D3D10 implementation used together with Wine that forms part of Valve's Steam Play has a fresh brew ready. The progress is amazing as always, that's the twenty-sixth release this year!

  • DXVK 0.92 Released With Fixes For Shadow of the Tomb Raider, Other Games

    DXVK 0.92 is the newly-minuted release and it adds support for bit-accurate clears for 11G11B10 UAVs in order to take care of an error message with the Shadow of the Tomb Raider game. DXVK 0.92 also has build issue fixes in conjunction with select versions of Meson, support for the DMOVC instruction that should help out some situations, rendering fixes for LA Noire, and visual issues have been resolved with Lords of the Fallen and The Surge.

Wine and Games: Wine-Staging 3.20 and Virtual Reality at Valve

Filed under
Gaming
  • Wine-Staging 3.20 Released, Fixes A Four Year Old Rendering Bug

    Building off Friday's release of Wine 3.20 is now Wine-Staging 3.20 with minor work added into this testing/experimental blend of Wine that tends to particularly suit gamers better than the upstream code-base.

    Wine-Staging 3.20 still contains more than 850 patches on top of upstream Wine, but at least more patches are being deemed stable and trickling into upstream... Just weeks ago that patch count was closer to 900.

  • Reports: Valve making their own VR HMD and apparently a new VR Half-Life

    It appears Valve are truly getting more serious about Virtual Reality as they appear to be making their own headset. On top of that, apparently a new Half-Life VR game is coming.

    Leaked to an imgur album, which contains multiple shots of the new hardware. These includes shots clearly showing a Valve logo:

Wine 3.20 and Gaming News

Filed under
Gaming
  • Wine Announcement

    The Wine development release 3.20 is now available.

  • Wine 3.20 Released With Several Improvements

    Wine 3.20 is now the latest bi-weekly development release for this increasingly popular code-base for running Windows programs/games on Linux and other operating systems.

    Wine 3.20 brings improvements to its IDL compiler, support for sub-storage transforms within MSIs, RPC/COM marshalling fixes, support for Unicode requests within WinHTTP, and shell auto-complete optimizations.

  • Snapshot Games have cancelled the Linux version of Phoenix Point [Ed: "It's clear Unity has had plenty of Linux issues in the past year though," Liam says. Unity uses Microsoft Mono. Be ready for Microsoft to vandalise GNU/Linux on the desktop by ALL MEANS POSSIBLE. Guess who Microsoft made GitHub's new chief: Mr. Mono.]

    Some news that I'm not particularly happy about. Snapshot Games, which includes X-COM creator Julian Gollop, have announced they've cancelled the Linux version of Phoenix Point.

    As a reminder: After having a succesful Fig campaign last year, where they raised well over $750K which went up to over $780K after it finished, Snapshot Games also gained over $1.2 million in pre-orders from their own store. Linux was a platform advertised during their crowdfunding campaign along with it being clearly listed as a platform on their official website's FAQ. They went on to release two backer builds, both of which had Linux support and ran quite well. After spending quite a number of hours in their second backer beta, I was extremely keen for the third build which was expanding the feature-set quite a lot.

    I ended up speaking to Snapshot Games, who gave me the news ahead of time so I've had a little time to think about this. Even so, I'm really not happy with the situation.

    They put up a dedicated page to talk briefly about it, after I told them not to leave the reasons why up to people's imaginations. Citing reasons like Linux requiring "specialised graphics programming" as it uses OpenGL and not DirectX, they also mentioned that Linux drivers are "not as comprehensive as for Windows and Mac" requiring them to make "adaptations to graphical shaders" to get them working. Additionally, they mentioned the issue of Linux having many distributions, Linux-specific Unity bugs like "not being able to correctly render the video player" and input issues. I won't comment much on those points, since I am not a game developer and so I've no idea how Unity handles different APIs and everything else Unity does. It's clear Unity has had plenty of Linux issues in the past year though.

  • The Wall, a rather unusual FPS game is planning to support Linux

    A recent discovery is The Wall, an usual competitive FPS now in Early Access on Steam and they're planning to support Linux.

    Speaking to the developer on the Steam forum, they said it was "Definitely" coming and then clarified it would be soon after the Early Access release which is out now.

  • Cheap Golf, a retro-styled comedy mini-golf adventure released with Linux support

    Cheap Golf from developer Pixeljam (Dino Run, Starr Mazer: DSP) is a surprisingly good and quite amusing retro-styled mini-golf adventure. A very easy game to get into, since it only requires a single hand to fling the mouse around.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

  • How Software Is Helping Big Companies Dominate
    Antitrust deserves the attention it’s getting, and the tech platforms raise important questions. But the rise of big companies — and the resulting concentration of industries, profits, and wages — goes well beyond tech firms and is about far more than antitrust policy. In fact, research suggests that big firms are dominating through their use of software. In 2011, venture capitalist Marc Andreessen declared that “software is eating the world.” Its appetizer seems to have been smaller companies. [...] This model, where proprietary software pairs with other strengths to form competitive advantage, is only becoming more common. Years ago, one of us (James) started a company that sold publishing software. The business model was to write the software and then sell licenses to publishers. That model still exists, including in online publishing where companies like Automattic, maker of the open source content management system WordPress, sell hosting and related services to publishers. One-off licenses have given way to monthly software-as-a-service subscriptions, but this model still fits with Carr’s original thesis: software companies make technology that other companies pay for, but from which they seldom derive unique advantage. That’s not how Vox Media does it. Vox is a digital publishing company known, in part, for its proprietary content management system. Vox does license its software to some other companies (so far, mostly non-competitors), but it is itself a publisher. Its primary business model is to create content and sell ads. It pairs proprietary publishing software with quality editorial to create competitive advantage. Venture capitalist Chris Dixon has called this approach the “full-stack startup.” “The old approach startups took was to sell or license their new technology to incumbents,” says Dixon. “The new, ‘full stack’ approach is to build a complete, end-to-end product or service that bypasses incumbents and other competitors.” Vox is one example of the full-stack model. The switch from the software vendor model to the full-stack model is seen in government statistics. Since 1998, the share of firm spending on software that goes to pre-packaged software (the vendor model) has been declining. Over 70% of the firms’ software budgets goes to code developed in-house or under custom contracts. And the amount they spend on proprietary software is huge — $250 billion in 2016, nearly as much as they invested in physical capital net of depreciation.
  • Metsä Wood - Open Source Wood Winner: ClipHut Structural Building System
  • Shutting the open sauce bottle
    While open source software has revolutionised the enterprise software world, a few people are starting to wonder if its very nature will survive the age of the cloud. The concept that software can be used by pretty much anyone for pretty much anything is causing its developers big problems in the era of distributed cloud computing services. Two open-source software companies have decided to alter the licences under which some of their software is distributed, with the expressed intent of making it harder -- or impossible -- for cloud computing providers to offer a service based around that software.
  • How do we handle and use such enormous amounts of data?
    How many gigabytes of data did we (the people of Earth) create yesterday? ...brain. is. thinking... More than 2.5 billion! And it's growing. Yes, it's hard for us to wrap our human brains around it. So, the question the Command Line Heros podcast deals with this week is: How do we handle and use such enormous amounts of data?
  • Security updates for Tuesday

Linux Leftovers

  • Sorry, Linux. Kubernetes is now the OS that matters [Ed: Mac Asay does't know what an operating system is. This is what happens when people with a law degree write about technology. And he trolls Linux for clicks.]
  • Clear Linux Making Progress With Encrypted Installations
    One of the features I've personally been looking forward to is the official support for encrypted installations with Clear Linux. While many don't view it as a particular desktop distribution, it does have all of the packages I personally need for my main production system. So I've been wanting to see how well it could work out as my main desktop OS and to chronicle that experience. Having official support for encrypted installations has been one of the last blockers for my requirements. You can currently setup Clear on an encrypted installation manually, but for simplicity and wanting to keep to the "official" installation routes, I've been waiting for them to officially support encrypted installs... Especially in this day and age, anyone installing a desktop Linux distribution particularly on a mobile/laptop/ultrabook should really be doing a full-disk encryption.
  • The Linux Throwie: A Non-Spacefaring Satellite
    Throwies occupy a special place in hardware culture — a coin cell battery, LED, and a magnet that can be thrown into an inaccessible place and stick there as a little beacon of colored light. Many of us will fondly remember this as a first project. Alas, time marches inevitably on, and launching cheerful lights no longer teaches me new skills. With a nod to those simpler times, I’ve been working on the unusual idea of building a fully functional server that can be left in remote places and remain functional, like a throwie (please don’t actually throw it). It’s a little kooky, yet should still deliver a few years of occasional remote access if you leave it somewhere with sunlight.
  • OnePlus To Launch 5G Phone In 2019; $100 Costlier Than OnePlus 6T
  • OnePlus Releases OxygenOS Open Beta 7, OnePlus Roaming Launched
    Chinese company OnePlus has released the new OxygenOS Open Beta 7 for its OnePlus 6 smartphone, which has introduced several updates and features.

OSS: Development and Conferences

  • Give your students edit access to their course syllabus
    I wanted to give students more agency in their learning. So I let them make pull requests against the syllabus. [...] This exercise was a learning experience for both my students and me, as we clearly had different visions of what constituted a "disruption." While we all agreed that students should pay attention to the instructor and engage in all classroom activities, students thought they should be able to take "important" calls during class time and that texting during class was acceptable. I thought that cell phones should be turned off entirely during class. Students also thought that leaving the classroom to get a drink without asking permission was acceptable, while I thought that they should handle thirst needs before or after class. This resulted in a discussion about professionalism and the expectations associated with college-level work. We discussed what constituted a distraction and agreed that making sounds, whispering, and talking in class all counted as distractions. This in turn led to a discussion of the impacts distractions can have on a learning environment and the importance of paying attention in class. We also explored the impact various learning technologies can have on a classroom—for example, the tools students with disabilities require to fully participate in class, such as a screen reader—and agreed that noise generated by these was acceptable under the policy we intended to construct.
  • Open source tools to consider for your RESTful APIs
    At the start of a RESTful API development project, a software team might be tempted to buy an expensive commercial API management tool when an open source tool can just as easily do the trick. In fact, there are plenty of open source tools that can help with each stage of the API lifecycle and help get an API development program off the ground at low cost.
  • London Perl Workshop

    As london.pm celebrates its 20th anniversary, join Katherine Spice in conversation with a panel of the group's former leaders.

  • GNOME at Capitole du Libre 2018
    Last Saturday and Sunday I went to the Capitole du Libre 2018 to animate the GNOME booth and help on the Purism one.
  • Find Out the Visa Requirements to Attend oSC19
    For people planning on attending the openSUSE Conference 2019 in Nuremberg, Germany, from May 24 – 26, there are certain requirements necessary to receive a visa for those who are not a citizen of a Schengen country.

Red Hat/IBM: OpenShift and Ansible, RHEL Updates