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Games: Atomix, Get-A-Grip Chip, GDScript in Godot

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Gaming
  • Atomix: A Molecule Building Game for Chemistry Nerds

    Atomix is built for Gnome desktops for Linux and Unix systems. However, if you in something similar you can try Atomiks for Windows and Linux desktops.

  • Robot grappling-magnet platformer Get-A-Grip Chip is out now and I'm hooked | GamingOnLinux

    A platformer where you can't jump? Well, it's been done before but not quite like this. Get-A-Grip Chip is out now and it's a wonderfully unique indie game worth your time. Note: key sent by the developer.

    Thing is, grappling hooks have been done before too, and there's a number of excellent games with it. Get-A-Grip Chip is still different though, as the grapple is a big magnet on your robot head and you can only use it at specific points. The challenge here is getting in range of each point, to hop between them all. The result is a game that's seriously charming, while also proving to be a good challenge.

  • GDScript progress report: Typed instructions

    It's been a while my last report because this particular task took me more time than I anticipated. GDScript now got a much needed optimization.

    Bug fixes

    Between my last report and this one I've been fixing many bugs in GDScript. While not thorough, it should be stable enough to not crash all the time. I am aware that a lot of bugs remain, but I'll iron them out when the features are complete.

    As I said before, if you found a bug not yet reported make sure to open a new issue so I can be aware of it.

    [...]

    I know many of you have been waiting for this. GDScript has had optional typing for quite a while, but so far it had only been for validation in the compilation phase. Now we're finally getting some performance boost at runtime.

    Note that some optimized instructions are applied with type inference but to enjoy the most benefit you have to use static typing for everything (you also get safer code, so it's a plus).

Programming Languages, Games and Going GPL

Filed under
Development
Gaming
  • Developer survey: C# losing ground to JavaScript, PHP and Java for cloud apps, still big in gaming [Ed: When Microsoft Tim writes about development trends he expectedly focuses on largely rejected Microsoft stuff, not what actually matters.]

    A new developer survey has shown the popularity of C#, the primary language of Microsoft's .NET platform, slipping from third to sixth place in three years, though usage is still growing in absolute terms and it is particularly popular in game development.

    Research company Slashdata surveyed over 17,000 developers globally for its 19th “State of the Developer Nation” report. The researchers make a point of attempting to measure the absolute number of programming language users, rather than simply looking at relative popularity, as done by indexes from the likes of StackOverflow or Redmonk.

  • Minecraft Java will move to Microsoft accounts in 2021, gets new social screen [Ed: Can Microsoft use Minecraft Java to attack Java itself?]
  • Classic 3D RTS 'Machines: Wired for War' goes open source under the GPL

    Machines: Wired for War is a true classic 3D RTS from the late 90s, and it appears to now be open source under the GPL and up on GitHub. This was in the list of actually being one of the first proper 3D games of the genre, although not as well known as many other RTS games.

    Back in 2019, one dedicated fan posted on their website about how they managed to grab a copy of the source, update it a bit and port it to modern platforms (Linux included). The actual rights to the game appear to sit with Nightdive Studios now, and they appear to have given the greenlight on open sourcing the code from that same fan which they've now listed on their own official GitHub.

  • Stellaris gets spooky with the Necroids Species Pack on October 29 | GamingOnLinux

    The latest expansion pack for Stellaris arrives on October 29 and it's going to get a little spooky with the Necroids Species Pack. Diving into the darker side of the galaxy, the expansion comes with as you prepare to meet the Necroids, an intelligent species who believe that death is not the end, but rather the beginning of their journey.

    Necroids are known to spend their days excitedly studying in preparation for their eventual "transformation" in the Elevation Chamber. They're not exactly the nicest bunch, and they certainly look the part too.

Games: Stadia, Steam Digital Tabletop Fest, ScourgeBringer and Godot 3.2.4 Beta 1

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Gaming
  • Stadia gets exclusive HUMANKIND beta, ARK: Survival Evolved heading to Stadia Pro + more | GamingOnLinux

    Day 2 of 3 down for the Stadia event (see day 1 here), with multiple new announcements to go through of new games coming and extras playable right now.

    Starting off with the big one, Stadia has an exclusive Beta of HUMANKIND, the upcoming 4x strategy game that's been likened to a Civilization-killer. Not only is it coming to Stadia, just like they did with the PAC-MAN battle royale title from yesterday anyone with a Google account can just jump on in right now and play it until October 28.

  • The Steam Digital Tabletop Fest is now live with sales, streams and more | GamingOnLinux

    Ready to fill your Steam Library full of awesome games once again or perhaps try out a demo or two? You might want to pull up a seat to the digital table then, as the Steam Digital Tabletop Fest is now live. This special event features nearly 40 hours of livestreams, virtual let's plays, panels, talks and so much more.

    The idea, done in partnership with Auroch Digital is to show off games that "explore the fusion between physical and digital games".

    For this event, they even made a trailer which is pretty unusual and goes to show how much Valve has changed over the years as they continue working with more developers on events like this. This is actually one of the biggest events I believe they've ever done.

  • Fast, challenging and you can run up walls to slice up enemies - ScourgeBringer is out | GamingOnLinux

    ScourgeBringer is a fast-paced action rogue-lite that has you run from room to room slicing and dicing through enemies, and it makes you feel awesome.

    Flying Oak Games, who previously made NeuroVoider, describe it as a "free-moving roguelite platformer" which doesn't really do it much justice. You're one of the last surviving humans, fighting through the ScourgeBringer, some kind of almighty weapon with a whole lot of random rooms inside which for some unknown reason decided to decimate the world. You given a big sword, a gun and then sent on your way to save everyone and perhaps redeem humanity. So, no pressure then right?

  • Godot Engine - Dev snapshot: Godot 3.2.4 beta 1

    Godot 3.2.3 was released a month ago and the reception was great! It focused mostly on fixing bugs and therefore we were somewhat conservative on what could be merged before the release.

    Now that we're confident that 3.2.3 works well, we can take some time to add new features to the 3.2 branch while you wait for Godot 4.0 Smile

Games: Tsuro, Perilous Warp, Two Point Hospital and More

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Gaming
  • Tsuro - The Game of The Path is a gorgeous digital adaption out now | GamingOnLinux

    A new digital adaption of the original board game Tsuro is out now with Tsuro - The Game of The Path, and it's really lovely. Note: The developer sent over a key to our Steam Curator.

    In Tsuro you each have indirect control of a coloured pebble, while taking it in turns to place down a single path tile in front of your little pebble to move it across the board. Incredible simple to get into, yet there's plenty of strategy involved in it and it really is quite brilliant. It's a wonderful adaption, with some digital-exclusive modes. You can play for the longest movement loop, the last one remaining on the board and more.

  • Retro 3D indie first-person shooter 'Perilous Warp' has released | GamingOnLinux

    The growing list of retro-fuelled shooters has another entry now with Perilous Warp which has released.

    Inspired by the greats like Quake, Unreal, Doom and Chasm: The Rift. There's cramped hallways, deadly weapons and plenty of action. Created by Crystice Softworks, who are known for the Half-Life mod Headcrab Frenzy and for the J.A.C.K level editor, this is their first full commercial release.

  • Go and cure Director's Gut in the Two Point Hospital: Culture Shock DLC out now | GamingOnLinux

    I sure do love a good pun and the Two Point Hospital: Culture Shock DLC that's out now is full of it, with plenty of new illnesses that you need to conquer. No laughing at the patients please.

    Two Point Hospital: Culture Shock is the biggest expansion so far in terms of total illness, however just like the other packs only a few of them are entirely new with new visuals and machines. As for the actual illnesses they're themed after the arts and media like Stunt Trouble, Private Parts, Snot Twist, Culture Shock, Stage Hand, Square Eyes, Wardrobe Malfunction and so on.

  • Fire a magical sword at goblins in the physics-based puzzler 'Sword Slinger' out now | GamingOnLinux

    Sword Slinger is a rather unique physics-based puzzle game about slaying goblins by controlling a sword with magical behaviours. Combine magical logic blocks together, to unleash amusing solutions. Out now with Linux support.

    Created by Firebelley, an indie game developer and software engineer based out of Northeast Ohio. Sword Slinger was created over a period of 7 months, after being fascinated with the idea that simple inputs can create complex outputs.

  • Brimstone & Mist is the latest update to the MMO Albion Online out now | GamingOnLinux

    As their player numbers continue climbing, Sandbox Interactive have just released a big mid-season update to Albion Online with Brimstone & Mist.

    While they regularly released big free expansions, this is a smaller and more focused update that continues to refine lots of new features from previous upgrades.

    That said, it's still quite a big update by itself considering it's an interim update. It adds in a new boss, multiple new enemies, new traps, more locations to go fishing, you can now roast Chicken, Goose, and Pork to create a new food line and the same for some of the new Fish, the mini-map had a big refresh to improve visual quality and readability, an optional language filter and much more.

  • Creature taming metroidvania Monster Sanctuary launches on December 8 | GamingOnLinux

    After a successful crowdfunding campaign on Kickstarter back in 2018 and then over a year in Early Access, Monster Sanctuary is now set for a full release.

    It's going to leave Early Access on December 8, and they've confirmed that the launch of Monster Sanctuary will include brand new content to expand the experience even further.

    Denis Sinner, the Managing Director at Moi Rai Games mentioned "The full release of the game will bring an exciting five-year journey to an end. Monster Sanctuary originally started out as a hobby project of mine while having a normal day job, and back then I couldn't imagine that it would be released as a full-fledged game on multiple platforms with a publisher on my side. Ever since we launched the game into Early Access last year, the community feedback we’ve received has helped to improve the game and make it the best possible experience."

Graphics: Mesa, Vulkan and AMD

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Gaming

  • Mesa Just Got A Significant Performance Boost For Intel Tiger Lake Chips

    Intel's Kenneth Graunke has written a few patches for Intel Gen12+ graphics chips that boost graphics performance by one to twelve percent. Don't get too excited, it only applies to Intel Tigerlake and newer and they won't arrive in mainstream GNU/Linux distributions until Mesa 20.3 is released mid-December.

  • The Vulkan driver for Raspberry Pi 4 becomes official for Linux, merged into Mesa | GamingOnLinux

    In case you've missed what's been going on, the progress on proper Vulkan support for the Raspberry Pi 4 has been going really well. So well in fact, that it's been merged into the upstream Mesa project and so it's all a bit more official.

    Writing in a guest post on the official Raspberry Pi blog, Igalia's Iago Toral, who has been largely responsible for hacking away on the v3dv driver gave an update on the progress.

    [...]

    Plenty more still to be done, and as they said, passing tests is one thing but real-world use is another. I've no doubt people will find many ways to break it while it's still in development. That's part of the point of being official in Mesa now though, makes it vastly easy to try it. As a proud owner of a Raspberry Pi 4, it's going to be fun to see it in action with Vulkan now.

  • AMDVLK 2020.Q4.1 Is Released With A New Vulkan Extension And Three Game-Specific Fixes - LinuxReviews

    AMD has released a new version of their AMDVLK Vulkan driver for Linux with support for one new Vulkan extensions and game-specific fixes for Wolfenstein II: The New Colossus, Second Extinction and X-plane. Performance is still overall worse than the AMD RAVD Vulkan driver that comes with Mesa 20.2.0 and performance is much worse in specific graphics benchmarks and image up-scaling.

    [...]

    AMDVLK's performance has long been sub-par compared to Mesa's RADV driver. That's the driver GNU/Linux distributions ship with, AMDVLK is optional. AMDVLK is much closer to the Windows-driver than Mesa's RADV and compatibility may be a reason to install the latest and greatest AMDVLK 2020.Q4.1 driver. Performance is, as you will see if you read on, not a reason to install it.

  • AMDVLK 2020.Q4.1 Released With Various Game Fixes - Phoronix

    AMD has issued their first open-source Vulkan driver code drop of the quarter with AMDVLK 2020.Q4.1.

    The main changes of AMDVLK 2020.Q4.1 are updating against the Vulkan API 1.2.156 revision and enabling support for VK_EXT_shader_image_atomic_int64. VK_EXT_shader_image_atomic_int64 allows for 64-bit integer atomic operations to work on images.

Games: Humble Bundle, Stadia, Amnesia: Rebirth, Steam Proton

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Gaming
  • Get some thrills on in the latest Humble Bundle with DUSK and Detention | GamingOnLinux

    Need to boost your library ready for Halloween? Humble Bundle are back with some cheap thrills for you. As usual, we will highlight those with Linux support / Linux builds in bold text to make it easy at a glance.

  • Stadia gets PAC-MAN 64-player Battle Royale, Jedi: Fallen Order soon and HUMANKIND beta | GamingOnLinux

    When Google started hyping up three days of announcements and demos, it has probably disappointed many that the first day was PAC-MAN.

    That's right, after Stadia got an exclusive Bomberman Battle Royale, it's now getting PAC-MAN Mega Tunnel Battle, a 64-player last-pac standing game. There's a demo available right now, which anyone can register for a Stadia account to hop in and try it (Stadia Pro not needed). Surprisingly, it's actually pretty good. Sounds like it might be Stadia exclusive at release too on November 17.

  • The latest horror from Frictional Games with Amnesia: Rebirth is out now | GamingOnLinux

    Frictional Games have now released their latest horror title with Amnesia: Rebirth, as you walk in the shoes of Tasi and guide them through an emotional experience.

    Using the same game engine as their previous game SOMA, which they call HPL3, Amnesia: Rebirth is a horror game that focuses on the journey as much as the end. It's all about the narrative and sinking into the thick atmosphere, Frictional say to not go in aiming to beat it but rather to immerse yourself in the world. Rebirth has a direct connection to Amnesia: The Dark Descent, however it's a fully stand-alone experience so you don't actually need to have played any others.

  • Steam Proton Updated To 5.13 Making Red Dead Redemption 2 Playable On Linux

    Linux users are simply some of the most stubborn users in the world, willing to forgo almost any convenience in exchange for keeping themselves both secure, and in absolute control of their operating system.

    Whereas Microsoft has attempted to further dummy-proof Windows 10 (bringing about a disastrous ‘software as a service’ routine with consistent updates and changes to everything with little to no warning), Linux is on the far other end of the spectrum where files and configurations rely a bit more on the user understand what they’re doing, rather than intelligent installers doing the necessary heavy lifting.

    If it’s a toss-up between the two, Linux is strongly recommended for the more tech-savvy users. If you’re keener, however, to ensure that you can play all of the latest games and popular tools, then Windows is likely the answer even with its arguably draconian policies and bloat-ware shoveling.

Games: Godot Engine, Lutris, XCOM, KeeperRL, Ampersat, Europa Universalis and More

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Gaming
  • X11 display server progress report

    I'm Camille, aka PouleyKetchoupp. I use Godot as an indie game developer (Nekomatata) and I've been a Godot contributor for a while (Github). Recently I was hired to work as a contractor on fixes and improvements for the Linux port of Godot 4.

    Most of the work was dedicated to fixing regressions due to the new Display Server used for window management, which allows support for multiple windows. I've also spent some extra time fixing old issues we had with X11 which required some refactoring in how the engine communicates with the X server. Some of them will be available in a later Godot 3.2 release as well.

    In this post I'm summarizing all the changes I've made in the X11 Display Server, in order to (hopefully) clarify how the X server works and how Godot communicates with it.

  • Godot Engine to get improved Linux support in the upcoming Godot 4 release | GamingOnLinux

    While the free and open source game engine Godot Engine already has Linux support, for both exported games and the full editor, it's set to get even better in Godot 4.0.

    In a blog post written by Camille Mohr-Daurat, they mentioned how they've been hired by the Godot team to work as a contractor on fixes and improvements for the Linux port of Godot. Camille Mohr-Daurat is an indie developer who actually uses Godot too at Nekomatata, where they created the unique ping-pong battler Punch Pong. So this is a real fun example of open source in action.

    Godot 4.0 will be coming with a new windowing system, so that you can separate parts of the Godot Engine editor from the main window. A lot of their work is focused on ensuring that works great on Linux with X11, which seems like there's a lot of work involved, because there's places where X11 doesn't have APIs to handle things where it does on other platforms like Windows and macOS - with drag and drop between windows being one mentioned example they've had to solve directly.

  • Lutris game launcher has a huge new Beta update out for testing | GamingOnLinux

    Lutris is the impressive all-in-one solution for managing games on Linux, bundling tons of sources of Linux releases from different stores under one roof as well as emulators, compatibility layers and more.

    Just recently on October 19 they put up the Beta of the new 0.5.8 release, and it includes some pretty huge changes and improvements all across the application. The way it actually works under the hood has been completely changed in many ways, along with the way you add games to it.

    Instead of manually importing games, it now attempts to sync up with your library across other stores like GOG, Humble and Steam. Adding games from the Lutris website using their scripts to set things up is also now in its own section, just called Lutris and it no longer depends on having install scripts for 3rd party services as Lutris will now run stuff with an "auto-generated" script but scripts on the Lutris database will take precedence if available

  • XCOM-ish combat and HOMM-styled world exploration Fort Triumph has a major update and sale | GamingOnLinux

    Possibly one of my favourite strategy game releases of 2020, Fort Triumph blends together XCOM styled combat with HOMM (Heroes of Might and Magic) exploration into quite a gem that doesn't take itself too seriously.

    What makes it fun is the environment interactions during battles, as you push rocks and drop trees onto enemies - it never gets old. It appears the team at CookieByte Entertainment have been busy too, with a huge free first post-release content upgrade out now.

    They've added in 27 new locations/events to the world map, and with some of these encounters you can add/remove traits from your heroes. Some of these encounters mix up the combat too, with some being unique Physics-only battles where you can only move around parts of the environment and not use normal abilities which sounds pretty hilarious.

  • KeeperRL, the open source dungeon building sim is getting a price bump in November | GamingOnLinux

    Fancy becoming a dungeon master? Well, if you're watching the pennies you might want to go and pick up KeeperRL before they price gets bumped up.

    This excellent open source building sim that mixes in RPG and roguelike elements has a lot to like about it, and it's been continually improved over 7 years now. Since it's had a lot added to it, and the developer has been working almost full time on it, they're going to be increasing the price from $14.99 to $20 on November 15. Plenty of notice if you were thinking about picking it up.

    Keep in mind they also said there will be no discounts planned until the big 1.0 release, so it's not going to be cheaper again any time soon.

  • Ampersat is an upcoming hack and slash shooter where everyone is ASCII | GamingOnLinux

    Mixing together ASCII characters and enemies, along with a full colour world, the hack and slash shooter Ampersat seems like a rather unique blend. A little weird too, with styles that usually clash and don't make sense together. You're the "at sign", the ampersat, and enemies are also these flat characters yet the world is 3D and full of colour. It looks bizarre but it works.

    Solo developer Gaterooze, Ink mentioned it was inspired by elements of Gauntlet and Smash TV to Zelda and a dash of Angband that "distils some favourite childhood gaming experiences into a fresh, fun hybrid that sees you killing a lot of monsters, finding a lot of loot, freeing captured letters and growing from a world-weary warrior mage into a powerful smashing/blasting machine".

  • Free copy of Europa Universalis II on GOG, with a huge Paradox Interactive sale going on | GamingOnLinux

    Paradox Interactive are celebrating the 20th anniversary of the Europa Universalis series so they're giving away Europa Universalis II and putting a bunch of other games on sale.

    For the free game, simply head to GOG.com and find the big banner. It doesn't support Linux like Paradox's later games, since it's a proper classic from way back in 2001 but you can try your luck with the Wine compatibility layer if you really want it.

  • Try the demo for Pyramid Plunge, a lighthearted platformer with a really odd couple | GamingOnLinux

    Ah yes, dangerous ancient pyramids with traps and deadly creatures, why not let a totally unprepared couple explore it? That's what you're doing in Pyramid Plunge as you run, carry your partner, fart to get airtime are more.

    The result is actually quite hilarious, mixing together challenging random generation with a sprinkle of comedy from the two wildly different characters that have a bit of banter between them like a true couple would. You don't see many platformers come along like this, what joy.

  • Proton: The Native Port Killer?

    The thrill surrounding the announcement of Street Fighter V coming to Linux was real. It was a few years after SteamOS was announced. After years of silence, fans started to doubt that this was becoming a reality. It wasn’t until two years after the initial release of Proton that Valve started to work with Capcom to try and make the Windows version compatible with Linux. Some people are still salty that it took this long to get here, and even more upset that this isn’t a native port. On the other hand, fans like myself are pleased that Valve/Capcom held to their word, even though they may have compromised a bit by making it Proton-compatible.

    The same goes for Rocket League. End-users like myself naturally get upset when delays happen, even though we don’t understand what it’s like to be on the developer’s side. Several months came and went after the original announcement, and finally the Mac and Linux versions of the game went live on Steam. Fast forward a few years later, and Psyonix decides to drop the ball for said versions, leaving it up to Proton to pick up the slack on Linux and bootcamp for Mac OS. Don’t even get me started on the fact that they basically abandoned support on Steam altogether in favor of the Epic Crap Store.

Games: DemonCrawl, Backbone, Omen Exitio

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Gaming
  • Minesweeper-inspired roguelite DemonCrawl has a big free Halloween update and event live | GamingOnLinux

    I'm not sure what I'm scared of more, creepy crawly Halloween stuff or spending even more time playing DemonCrawl with the latest free expansion. With gameplay very much inspired by the classic Minesweeper, it's got that horrible "one more turn" feeling. It's so easy to get into too but devilishly difficult to actually get through.

    DemonCrawl needs little in the way of an introduction really. It's Minesweeper on steroids, with some rogue-lite / RPG flavour thrown into it to create a great mix. Imagine each board being an area your character is travelling through, complete with chests to find, money to grab and monsters.

  • Noir roleplaying detective adventure Backbone is 'content complete' with a new trailer | GamingOnLinux

    With a free Prologue available to try out right now, developer EggNut has announced that Backbone is pretty much content complete.

    Quite exciting, as Backbone: Prologue which arrived on Linux officially back in October 2019 has been reviewed exceptionally well by users on Steam. That's really encouraging on what to expect from the full game when it releases next year. The developer said in the recent announcement that, amongst other things, "Backbone is almost done" and it sounds like they don't have much left to do apart from a big polishing pass on it.

  • Need a scary story-rich adventure novel for Halloween? Try out Omen Exitio: Plague | GamingOnLinux

    Omen Exitio: Plague appears to be a title we've never even mentioned here on GOL which is surprising as it looks great, it supports Linux and users enjoy it. Released back in 2018, Omen Exitio: Plague is a visual novel choice-based adventure set in H.P. Lovecraft's otherworldy universe, so you can expect all sorts of nasty creatures to appear.

    Italian developer Tiny Bull Studios say it's styled very much like gamebooks of the '80s and '90s, and while it has Lovecraft themes the overall plot and characters are original and what happens is guided by your choices. You could say it's a choose your own adventure, although we don't want to get sued by Chooseco now do we.

Games: Stardew Valley, Book of Travels and More

Filed under
Gaming
  • Stardew Valley to get splitscreen co-op in the big 1.5 update and what else to expect | GamingOnLinux

    Stardew Valley, one of the most popular casual farming life sims available on PC is getting another major upgrade and some features have been teased out by the creator.

    Eric Barone, known as ConcernedApe, posted on Twitter that the 1.5 update will bring (amongst other things) splitscreen co-op which is quite exciting. Barone confirmed in follow-up posts that on PC this would be with up to 4 people.

  • Might and Delight tease early Book of Travels footage, will experiment will player numbers | GamingOnLinux

    Book of Travels is the upcoming RPG from Might and Delight, a developer known for the Shelter series and Meadow and I'm seriously curious to learn more about it.

    After a very successful crowdfunding campaign back in November 2019, they've continued giving regular progress updates on their unique take on an online RPG. They're using the term "TMORPG", which means tiny multiplayer online role-playing game. So unlike big MMOs, they're going with smaller more intimate numbers. Something they did with the likes of Meadow with it having around 50 people together. In a post on Kickstarter, they mentioned how with Book of Travels in Early Access next year, they will be experimenting with the number to see what works for it so they're not yet set on an exact amount.

  • Work for a bumbling supervillain in Henchman Story - try the demo | GamingOnLinux

    Love a good superhero story? Well, this isn't it. Instead, you're a henchman following around a pretty clumsy supervillain in Henchman Story. A new and somewhat amusing visual novel currently in development by Silken Sail Entertainment, and they're currently funding it on Kickstarter.

    "It’s thankless work. Week in and week out, you put on your purple spandex and get the crap beaten out of you by much stronger, much cooler people wearing much fancier spandex. But the checks clear, and Lord Bedlam offers healthcare, so a job’s a job, right?"

  • Free and open source PlayStation 4 Remote Play client Chiaki adds PS4 8.0 firmware support | GamingOnLinux

    Own a PlayStation 4 and want to stream games from it to your Linux desktop? Chiaki is great for that and a fresh upgrade is out to keep it working.

    As a reminder: it's a free and open source project, not backed by Sony and totally unofficial. Impressive though, and it actually works quite well. Sony recently upgraded the PS4 firmware, and each time that happens it tends to break Chiaki, thankfully though it doesn't happen too often.

  • Stadia to get a bunch more Ubisoft games including Assassin's Creed and Far Cry | GamingOnLinux

    Not long after confirmation that Cyberpunk 2077 will be on Stadia at release on November 19, Google has confirmed lots more games are on the way from Ubisoft.

    We already knew of a few newer titles coming to Stadia from Ubisoft, however, it appears they're really going all-in with what they have.

Will Google Stadia Boost Linux Gaming?

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Google
Gaming

Following my recent article on Steam Machines, quite a few comments appeared on the interwebs. Among them, someone remarked that my final point about Linux Gaming being too reliant on Valve was missing the fact that Google Stadia exists. And therefore this would be akin to having several companies for which Linux gaming matters.

This is a valid point. I had to address it.

What is Stadia? Stadia is a solution designed by Google to stream games to any device with little latency, as long as such devices have a Google Stadia client, the Chrome web browser or a Chromecast. There is a free tier where you can use Stadia and purchase games as you go, and a Pro version which costs about 10 bucks per month after you buy the Premiere Edition with the controller (129 USD).

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More in Tux Machines

LibreOffice 7.1 Office Suite Enters Beta, Promises a Plethora of Improvements

After about six months of development, the upcoming LibreOffice 7.1 office suite is now ready for public beta testing. The first beta release has arrived and anyone willing to help the development team discover and fix bugs can download it right now from the official website for Linux, macOS, and Windows platforms. LibreOffice 7.1 promises a plethora of improvements and some new features, starting with a new outline folding mode for Writer. This adds a button with arrow next to a selected heading in a word document, allowing users to fold all text from the current heading to the next one when clicked and with all its subheadings when right clicked. Read more

today's howtos and proprietary software

  • Everything you need to know to become an expert Linux admin - TechRepublic

    IT professionals have to be life-long learners with quarterly goals for improving their skills to keep up with the industry, particularly when it comes to Linux. System administrators should be constantly looking for new ways to improve their skills for managing Linux servers and distributions.  This roundup of TechRepublic Premium resources, by Linux expert Jack Wallen, can help you fill the holes in your skills gap. There is advice for mastering the command line as well as selecting the best GUI tool. Maybe your challenge is managing users or permissions? Wallen has got you covered with that task, too. Sysadmins can use any one of these resources to get smarter about Linux and bring value to the IT team.

  • PAM Bypass: when null(is not)ok

    Someone enters an IRC support channel and proclaims their dovecot server has been hacked and a non existing user sends spam email from their server. The initial reaction might be something along the lines of Wat With the following assumption that the user clearly did something wrong. Hosting email is difficult after all. I don’t quite recall how rest of the support went, but it was solved and the root cause was not found. However, we keep on rolling! Then someone posts about a similar incident on r/archlinux. Now, if this happens twice something is amiss! Arch has had a few issues with PAM lately, thus it could be that there is a configuration issue. Johannes and I try to reproduce, but I don’t get far and Johannes keeps on working on the issue.

  • How to install Discord on Linux Mint 20 - YouTube

    In this video, we are looking at how to install Discord on Linux Mint 20.

  • How to install Discord Canary on a Chromebook

    Today we are looking at how to install Disord Canary, the Alpha Builds of Discord, on a Chromebook. Please follow the video/audio guide as a tutorial where we explain the process step by step and use the commands below.

  • Build your own ruler in the massive Crusader Kings III update out now | GamingOnLinux

    Paradox has released the big 1.2 update to Crusader Kings III, with it comes a fun new feature that lets you properly design your initial ruler. Since the release you've been able to step into the shoes of pre-set historical monarchs and leaders. Carrying their legacy on through the ages, and across the world. Now though, Paradox are giving us much more control over our game and our leader. You can now design them yourself with various options including appearance, age, ethnicity, sexual orientation, and more with the results sometimes looking quite amusing. You start by choosing a location, then the option to design your own will be available. Unlike how it was handled with Crusader Kings II, this is an entirely free feature added to the base game.

  • Vivaldi Web Browser Now Has a Built-in Email Client

    A fully-featured email client is the latest feature to be added to Vivaldi, the Chromium-based web browser. The bods beavering away on the wannabe web fave have added a native IMAP and POP3 email client to the app, as well as a RSS feed reader, and multi-account friendly calendar. Other recent feature additions have included a word processor and a built-in arcade game. Although Vivaldi Mail (as the feature is known) is currently of a ‘pre-Beta quality’ it is fully functional and works relatively well already. On paper Vivaldi Mail will work with most modern e-mail services via IMAP or POP. Alas, for now, this doesn’t include Google or Gmail accounts.

Programming Leftovers

  • A beginner's guide to developing with React | Opensource.com

    React is a JavaScript user interface (UI) library that was built and is maintained by Facebook. React helps JavaScript developers think logically and functionally about how they want to build a UI.

  • DOM Recording For Web Application Demos

    To show off the power of our Pernosco debugger, we wanted many short demo videos of the application interface. Regular videos are relatively heavyweight and lossy; we wanted something more like Asciinema, but for our Web application, not just a terminal. So we created DOMRec, a DOM recorder.

  • The 20 Best Kotlin Books for Beginner and Expert Developers

    Here you will find the top Kotlin books that will make it very interesting and almost effortless for you to learn Kotlin. Kotlin is a statically composed, universally useful programming language with type deduction. It is also a cross-platform language. Kotlin is intended to engage completely with Java, and Kotlin’s standard library’s JVM variant relies upon the Java Class Library. However, Kotlin’s type of derivation permits its syntax to be more compact and precise. Therefore, it has become quite crucial to learn Kotlin these days. But to learn it in the shortest number of days, a perfect set of Kotlin books is indecipherably important. Whether or not to pick Kotlin or Java for new advancement has been coming up a ton in the Android people group since the Google I/O declaration. The short answer is that Kotlin code is more secure and more succinct than Java code and that Kotlin and Java records can coincide in Android applications, so Kotlin isn’t just valuable for new applications but also for growing existing Java applications as well.

  • What the Error Handling Project Group is Working On

    The Rust community takes its error handling seriously. There’s already a strong culture in place for emphasizing helpful error handling and reporting, with multiple libraries each offering their own take (see Jane Lusby’s thorough survey of Rust error handling/reporting libraries). But there’s still room for improvement. The main focus of the group is carrying on error handling-related work that was in progress before the group's formation. To that end, we're working on systematically addressing error handling-related issues, as well as eliminating blockers that are holding up stalled RFCs. Our first few meetings saw us setting a number of short- and long-term goals. These goals fall into one of three themes: making the Error trait more universally accessible, improving error handling ergonomics, and authoring additional learning resources.

  • How to collect Rust source-based code coverage

    Source-based code coverage was recently introduced in Rust. It is more precise than the gcov-based coverage, with fewer workarounds needed. Its only drawback is that it makes the profiled program slower than with gcov-based coverage. In this post, I will show you a simple example on how to set up source-based coverage on a Rust project, and how to generate a report using grcov (in a readable format or in a JSON format which can be parsed to generate custom reports or upload results to Coveralls/Codecov).

Audiocasts/Shows/Videos: Feren OS, A First Look At Garuda Linux KDE "Dr4Gonized", and Trolling Linux