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Gaming

Live Xbox 360 shot!

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Gaming

Can’t tell you how we got our hands on this image, but what you’re looking at is a real live shot of the Xbox 360 that someone sneakily snapped with their cameraphone at Microsoft’s Xbox360 Revealed launch party in Los Angeles last night.

The Art and Design of Quake 4

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Gaming

AFTER BEING ANNOUNCED nearly four years ago at QuakeCon 2001, how much do we really know about Quake 4?

We catch up with members of Raven and id Software to talk about the visual stylings of the latest Quake installment.

Quake 4 confirmed for Q4

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Gaming

As part of Activision's earnings call today, CEO and president Ronald Doornink answered the customary questions from game industry analysts. And in so doing so, he revealed Activison's lineup for the 2005 holiday season, a roster that will make the company a formidable adversary to its rival publishers.

Calif. violent video game bill passes committee

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Gaming

California lawmakers reconsidered and approved a bill in committee on Thursday that would ban the sale of violent video games to minors.

Online gaming costs set to rise

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Gaming

Downloadable content is becoming an established part of online console gaming, but what will gamers see in the next round of consoles?

Turner tapping into game market

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Gaming

The company that helped revive old films is hoping to bring classic video games out of the vault. Atlanta-based Turner Broadcasting will move into the subscription PC game market this fall with new GameTap service.

That's 'Mr Scarface' to you...

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Gaming

Now, simply making a game based around the events of the movie was clearly never going to work. Either the team could do the classic fallback of doing a prequel about how Montana got where he was, or mess with the history and do one of those "ooh, what would have happened if he had survived that manic mansion scene at the end?"

eurogamer.net grills the game's producer Cam Webber on what he claims will become one of this year's biggest hits...

Unreal Championship 2

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Reviews
Gaming

As you might already be expecting, it's a game best played with your mates, and unlike previous UT or UC titles, the need to play it multiplayer is probably even more marked here thanks to a fairly short single-player campaign that really knows how to bust your balls, despite being something of a glorified training ground. Soon enough you're engaging in a selection of familiar ladder matches, getting to grips with the third-person perspective, and working out whether it makes much difference to shoot in first-person or not.

New CS & HL2 Maps Coming

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Gaming

Steam has announced they will be releasing new maps for Counter Strike and Half Life 2 on Monday.

Masters Of Doom Casting Call

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Movies
Gaming

Since it was announced that Showtime would be producing a new bio-pic movie based on Masters of Doom, David Kushner's 2003 non-fictional account of the rise of id Software in general and its two well known founders, John Carmack and John Romero, in particular. The big question is: what actors should play these two roles in the movie?

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Linux 5.5-rc1

  • Linux 5.5-rc1
    We've had a normal merge window, and it's now early Sunday afternoon,
    and it's getting closed as has been the standard rule for a long while
    now.
    
    Everything looks fairly regular - it's a tiny bit larger (in commit
    counts) than the few last merge windows have been, but not bigger
    enough to really raise any eyebrows. And there's nothing particularly
    odd in there either that I can think of: just a bit over half of the
    patch is drivers, with the next big area being arch updates. Which is
    pretty much the rule for how things have been forever by now.
    
    Outside of that, the documentation and tooling (perf and selftests)
    updates stand out, but that's actually been a common pattern for a
    while now too, so it's not really surprising either. And the rest is
    all the usual core stuff - filesystems, core kernel, networking, etc.
    
    The pipe rework patches are a small drop in the ocean, but ended up
    being the most painful part of the merge for me personally. They
    clearly weren't quite ready, but it got fixed up and I didn't have to
    revert them. There may be other problems like that that I just didn't
    see and be involved in, and didn't strike me as painful as a result ;)
    
    We're missing some VFS updates, but I think we'll have Al on it for
    the next merge window. On the whole, considering that this was a big
    enough release anyway, I had no problem going "we can do that later".
    
    As usual, even the shortlog is much too large to post, and nobody
    would have the energy to read through it anyway. My mergelog below
    gives an overview of the top-level changes so that you can see the
    different subsystems that got development. But with 12,500+ non-merge
    commits, there's obviously a little bit of everything going on.
    
    Go out and test (and special thanks to people who already did, and
    started sending reports even during the merge window),
    
    Linus
    
    
  • Linus Torvalds Kicks Off Development of Linux Kernel 5.5, First RC Is Out Now

    The two week-long merge window that opened with the release of the Linux 5.4 kernel series last month ended today with the launch of the first release candidate of Linux kernel 5.5, which was announced by Linus Torvalds himself. That's right, Linus Torvalds has officially kicked off the development cycle of the next major Linux kernel series, Linux 5.5, which is now available for public testing from the kernel.org website. Linux kernel 5.5-rc1 is the first milestone in many to come and gives the community a first look at the new features and changes. "We've had a normal merge window, and it's now early Sunday afternoon, and it's getting closed as has been the standard rule for a long while now," said Linus Torvalds. "Everything looks fairly regular - it's a tiny bit larger (in commit counts) than the few last merge windows have been, but not bigger enough to really raise any eyebrows. And there's nothing particularly odd in there either that I can think of: just a bit over half of the patch is drivers, with the next big area being Arch updates."

  • Linux 5.5 Feature Overview - Raspberry Pi 4 To New Graphics Capabilities To KUnit

    Linux 5.5-rc1 is on the way to mirrors and with that the Linux 5.5 merge window is now over. Here is a look at the lengthy set of changes and new features for this next Linux kernel that will debut as stable in early 2020. Among the many changes to find with Linux 5.5 are support for the Raspberry Pi 4 / BCM2711, various performance changes still being explored, support for reporting NVMe drive temperatures, a new Logitech keyboard driver, AMD HDCP support for content protection, wake-on-voice support from Chromebooks, the introduction of KUnit for unit testing the kernel, new RAID1 modes that are quite exciting for Btrfs, and much more. Below is a more detailed look based upon our original monitoring and reporting.

  • Unified sizeof_member() Re-Proposed For Linux 5.5

    After not being merged for Linux 5.4, the new sizeof_member() macro as a unified means of calculating the size of a member of a struct has been volleyed for Linux 5.5 for possible inclusion on this last day of the merge window. The Linux kernel to now has supported SIZEOF_FIELD, FIELD_SIZEOF, sizeof_field as means of calculating the size of a member of a C struct... The new sizeof_member looks to clean-up that code cruft that has accumulated over the years with converting all usage of the old macros over to this new unified macro.

The Linux Setup – Kezz Bracey, Web Designer/Developer

I found Kezz on Twitter and I’m so glad I did because this is a wonderful interview. First of all, I love the KDE details. Because while I don’t use KDE, I respect it. I wish I could tame it the way Kezz has. Instead, I tend to bow to its will, when really, if I knew how, like Kezz, I could bend it to mine. I also appreciate the screencasting information. I don’t do it very often anymore, but I do know that at some point, there were concerns about the lack of a good Linux screencasting program. Apparently that’s no longer an issue, which is great to hear. Read more

Contributing to KDE is easier than you think – Porting websites to Markdown

This will be a new series of blog posts explaining different ways to contribute to KDE in an easy-to-digest manner. I plan for this series to be parallel to my keyboard shortcuts analysis so that there can be content being published (hopefully) every week. I was also feeling a bit bad about the fact that this blog is available over planet.kde.org (a feed for blog posts made by KDE contributors that also shows a bit of their personal lives and projects), but my other series was focusing more on other DEs, despite also being a project to improve KDE. The purpose of this series originated from how I feel about asking users to contribute back to KDE. I firmly believe that showing users how contributing is easier than they think is more effective than simply calling them out and directing them to the correct resources; especially if, like me, said user suffers from anxiety or does not believe they are up to the task, in spite of their desire to help back. It is true that I had the initiative to contact Nate Graham and Carl Schwan through Reddit, but it is also true that, had they not shown me how contributing back can be done in several small, feasible ways too, I would likely not have started contributing back. Out of respect and due to the current need for help with updating the KDE websites, my first post on this subject will document how to help Carl Schwan port older websites to Markdown, despite there being easier tasks than that. Currently, and as to my knowledge, Carl Schwan and Adrián Chaves Fernandez are the only two main KDE websites contributors, with help and mentorship from other KDE contributors such as Jonathan Riddell and, of course, the whole Promo team, who handles websites as well. This is quite the low number of contributors for such a huge amount of websites to be updated, you see; that’s why your help would be much appreciated! Read more

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