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Gaming

Games: Dead Cells, Sunset Shapes, Dying Light - Hellraid and More

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Gaming
  • Dead Cells gets another big free update and a Demake Soundtrack

    A chiptune/8-bit version of the Dead Cells soundtrack? Absolutely sign me up. Oh, there's also a brand new free content update out now which is nice too.

    What they're calling the "Barrels o' Fun" update is out now, with an entirely new level/biome to play through which provides you with an alternative path to High Peak Castle which should spice-up the late game. This of course comes with new weapons, enemies, explosions and probably many player deaths. The new biome is called The Derelict Distillery, which comes with its own distinct style full of "old broken barrels and bottles, pipes venting steam, cool looking metal containers in the background - that kind of thing". That's great and all but it's the enemies that are important here, there's a new angry fella who throws big explosive barrels at you.

  • You are what you eat in the run and gun game Bite the Bullet

    What they're calling the "Barrels o' Fun" update is out now, with an entirely new level/biome to play through which provides you with an alternative path to High Peak Castle which should spice-up the late game. This of course comes with new weapons, enemies, explosions and probably many player deaths. The new biome is called The Derelict Distillery, which comes with its own distinct style full of "old broken barrels and bottles, pipes venting steam...

    [...]

    Quite a bit like the feel of Metal Slug, Contra and those sorts of run and gun games but with a little added platforming and wall jumping here and there.

  • Sunset Shapes is a relaxing puzzle game about building shadows

    Playing with shadows is something I'm sure we've all done a few times and Sunset Shapes takes that idea, merges it with some almost Tetris-like shapes to have you build a shadow.

    Inspired by the basic gameplay found in .projekt, each level gives you a set of shapes you need to fill with shadows. To do so, the game drops a bunch of random blocks onto the floor, for you to then move them around the air to attempt to fill out those shadow-shapes. For a puzzle game, it's actually a pretty sweet idea.

  • Evolution sim The Sapling expands in September with massive new features

    Indie game dev Wessel Stoop has announced their evolution sim, The Sapling, will be getting a first proper major update since entering Early Access in 2019.

    With an aim for The Flower Update to land on September 10, Stoop mentioned over email that they spent three months completely rewriting and optimizing the underlying engine. As a result, they mentioned it's become possible to make scenarios 100 times larger.

  • Over 8 years in development later, Factorio is properly out now

    Originally crowdfunded on IndieGoGo back in 2013, who would have thought this 2D game about building conveyor belts across a big map would be such a big hit? A great many years later, 8+ in total and here we are. Factorio has now left Early Access as a proper full game.

    The game was pretty much finished already, this last push was to get it out before Cyberpunk which ended up being delayed anyway. With that in mind, there's some rough edges here and there that needs sorting. Still, they said they wanted to make the release truly special, so they added in a big 'Spidertron' walking spider mech that has all sorts of ridiculous uses and it sounds like serious fun. It can driven, remotely controlled, it has rocket launchers and more.

  • Rip Them Off is an upcoming blend of tower defense and satirical economic management

    Tower defense mixed blended with an economic management puzzle that has a satirical take on capitalism? Can't say I remember any other game that blends such elements together. Rip Them Off from Lozange Lab is releasing in September and it's now their PR team has reached out to us directly here at GOL to confirm Linux PC support.

    "The Board needs its profit, and it’s up to you to line the streets with shops the masses can’t resist. Choose your locations, pick your stores and earn enough to advance up the corporate ladder with its increasingly difficult challenges."

  • Dying Light - Hellraid is out now giving you a little dungeon crawling

    Based loosely upon what would have been a standalone game from Techland (it's "on-hold"), Dying Light - Hellraid, a small DLC that swaps Zombies for Skeletons and sends you into a cramped and streamlined dungeon crawler.

    Techland say it's not just a new map, as they created new enemies for it and it has its own progression system giving you gradual access to new swords, axes and hammers. While you can't take regular equipment into Hellraid, you do get to take these brand new weapons outside into the normal Dying Light world once you pay using the new coin system. It also has co-op support so you can play with others.

  • Dota Underlords is getting a hero rotation soon and a rank reset

    Valve have remembered that Dota Underlords exists and needs some attention, with an announcement that it's going to see a hero rotation soon.

    Addressing the fact that since release, updates have slowed down and have mostly been balance changes, they mentioned how their team has been helping "other recent Valve projects ship" and external issues "2020 everybody" (COVID19 interrupted everything). They've mentioned that in the "next few weeks" we will get a hero rotation bringing in 8 new heroes, along with new alliances, new items and a rank reset. Hopefully this is the start of more updates to come.

Games: Android, GNU/Linux and New Titles

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Gaming
  • How to Find New and Exciting Games to Play on Android
  • 16 of the Best Free Games For Linux

    “Free” and “Linux” go hand in hand beautifully, like chips and a milkshake, and even though Linux isn’t widely seen as a gaming platform, there is a veritable wealth of free games you can get for it if you look in the right places. That’s in large part thanks to unpaid, open-source developers, who collaborate to bring classics (and new games) all together in Linux.

  • Quirky comedy point and click adventure 'Sol 705' is out now for Linux PC

    Sol 705, a point and click adventure that pays homage to the classics from the likes of Lucas Arts, Sierra is out now and it's added Linux PC support too.

    Developed by Land Patricio and Space Indie Studios, it appears this is a crowdfunded title that slipped through the cracks as we completely missed the successful Kickstarter from 2018 where the developer pulled in over ten thousand dollars. While it's designed like the classics, it does have plenty of modern touches from a hint system to voice acting for some of the seriously varied cast.

  • The Bomber Crew team announced Space Crew and it's coming to Linux PC

    Did you enjoy Bomber Crew? Runner Duck's strategic simulation game was a wonderful release from 2017 and they're now going aiming to go further with Space Crew.

    This was actually announced back in June, although at that point the platforms it was launching on was not confirmed. Towards the end of July, I spotted Linux appearing in the system requirements and today the developer emailed back with a firm confirmation, "Yes, we are planning on Space Crew supporting Linux at launch.".

  • Religion creation auto-battler Godhood has launched after a rough time for Abbey Games

    After going through funding and development troubles, Abbey Games have now launched the 1.0 release of their religion creation auto-battler Godhood.

    Quite a relaxing and laid-back experience that blends together a little bit of many things. You construct a religion, build up a little town and engage in hands-off turn-based battles that do everything for you so you get to sit back and watch how it all unfolds. Quite a different take on the auto-battling seen in the likes of Dota Underlords that's for sure.

  • The free Rise of Avalon expansion for Albion Online is live

    Free to play and now much bigger, Albion Online has a brand new expansion out with Rise of Avalon and there's lots of new goodies to play through.

    One of the biggest additions to Albion Online since it began, this brings the Roads of Avalon, a big network of magical pathways that bring new ways to travel, transport and engage in combat allowing you to explore the Wilderness of Avalon. Another huge addition are Corrupted Dungeons, giving Solo players something fun that mixes PvE and PvP invasions together in randomized dungeons. There's also fifteen powerful new Avalonian weapons to find.

  • Streets of Rogue gets a big bug-fix update as work continues on a sequel

    Streets of Rogue, one of my absolute favourite indie games has a new update out as work continues to find and fix every possible bug, plus a few new bits were added.

    Before getting into the juice of the update though, with the developer previously confirming a sequel is in the works (that should also come to Linux) they've briefly mentioned it again now. In the update notes, they mentioned how they're building up the tech needed for the sequel and that it's going "really smoothly.". This work will allow for a much bigger and more open world, which sounds pretty exciting!

Games: Terminal Phase, Imperator: Rome and More

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Gaming
  • Terminal Phase in Linux Magazine (Polish edition)

    Hey look at that! My terminal-space-shooter-game Terminal Phase made an appearance in the Polish version of Linux Magazine. I had no idea, but Michal Majchrzak both tipped me off to it and took the pictures. (Thank you!)

    I don't know Polish but I can see some references to Konami and SHMUP (shoot-em-up game). The screenshot they have isn't the one I published, so I guess the author got it running too... I hope they had fun!

  • Imperator: Rome gets a major free update, new DLC and cross-store multiplayer

    Paradox Interactive and Paradox Development Studio put out a massive upgrade for Imperator: Rome which includes a free update, an expansion and cross-platform / cross-store online play.

    There's quite a lot to dissect here, so let's start with the free content update. The 1.5 "Menander" update went out, as part of their focus on smaller and more regular updates to various systems. With the main point being to add greater depth to cultural management in the game.

  • Prepare your hard drive as another Steam Game Festival is coming in October

    After a massive success with the most recent Steam Game Festival back in June, it's going to return for another round later this year in October. This is where Steam users get to play through a ton of limited-time demos, which originally started back in December 2019 to go along with The Game Awards.

    From a post on the Steamworks Development group on Steam, the date is confirmed to be October 7 - 13. Valve mentioned in the announcement that they will soon open up the developer opt-in for the event, giving developers another chance to get a demo out there and get more eyes on their game. Developers don't have long, as the opt-in date is only open from between August 19 - 26.

Games: DRAG, Valve Index kit and Inscryption

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Gaming

  • DRAG | Linux Gaming | Ubuntu 20.04 | Native

    DRAG running natively through Linux.

  • Sci-fi racer with fancy 4-point physics 'DRAG' is now in Early Access

    Orontes Games have finally unleashed DRAG, their sci-fi racer with advanced 4-point physics into Early Access. Note: key provided to GOL by the developer.

    Introducing what they say is a "new kind of vehicle-physics", their 4-way contact point traction technology (or 4CPT-technology for short) simulates every component of the vehicles in real time. The result is supposed to give you "realistic, dynamic" behaviour with a full damage model, so expect to see wheels flying across your screen when in multiplayer.

  • My experiences of Valve's VR on Linux

    As the proud and excited owner of a shiny new Valve Index kit to go with my almost-new all-AMD rig, I thought I’d outline the journey to getting it all working, exclusively on Linux.

    Now bear in mind that I’m not amazingly Linux-savvy. I’ve been using it since the early 2000’s, sure, and full time, exclusively, since 2013, but I’m not very interested in learning the guts of this stuff. I’m extremely technical as a network nerd, but my O/S is just a tool to let me run cool things. I want to be a “normal” consumer of that O/S and if things don’t work out of the box, I take a dim view of it and I don’t have a lot of patience for terminal hacks or “compiling my own kernel”.

  • Inscryption from the developer of Pony Island has a new trailer

    Inscryption from Daniel Mullins Games (Pony Island, The Hex) sounds absolutely wild and it's got a brand new trailer but we've got quite some time to wait on it.

    Based upon the title Sacrifices Must Be Made, which Mullins made for the Ludum Dare 43 Game Jam, Inscryption is described as an "inky black card-based odyssey that blends the deckbuilding roguelike, escape-room style puzzles, and psychological horror into a blood-laced smoothie".

Games: Drink More Glurp, RimWorld, Jumpala and More

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Gaming
  • Party game 'Drink More Glurp' is an absolute barrel of laughs - out now

    Drink More Glurp, a party game that thoroughly parodies sporting events like the Olympic Games and also pokes fun at sponsorship systems is out now. Note: key provided by the developer.

    Set on an alien world where the inhabitants attempted to copy our sporty games, however they got everything just a little bit wrong which has resulted in a serious of ridiculous contests with completely mental physics. This might be the funniest party game I've played all year. After trying the original demo during the Steam Game Festival, I was hooked.

  • AntiMicro | Map Keyboard and Mouse Controls to Gamepad on openSUSE

    Installed a game called Pokemon Insurgence on Lutris and there was no way to play the game with a gamepad. Rather than try to fight things, set out for an application that would map the keyboard controls to the WiiU Pro Controller that has become my gamepad of choice.

    I know I heard it was possible on a podcast some time ago and since I was probably doing something else and didn’t have a notebook handy to write down whatever it was, I began my search and found this AntiMicro as a solution.

  • Vibrant twin-stick slasher 'Breakpoint' gives you exploding weapons

    Enjoy some classic fast-paced vibrant arcade-style action? Breakpoint looks like it's worthy of some attention for putting a nice unique spin on it.

    With bright neon graphics, they mixed in elements from the classic arcade games with "modern sensibilities". It's a top-down highscore chaser with melee weapons that…explode? Yes. No ranged attacks, no laser weapons, no pew-pew-pew. Instead you slice, crush, and blast your way through the swarm and when you push your weapons to their breaking point (it's called Breakpoint—get it?), they unleash a big explosion.

  • Steelbreakers turns the feel of classic Zelda into local multiplayer action

    The developer mentioned their idea with it was to make a game they wanted to play that they felt didn't exist already. As they said they "always wanted to play a Zelda game that demanded technical skill and would let you fight with your friends on a top-down 2d playing field" and so Steelbreakers was created.

    Together up to four players can fight for dominance in small arenas with traps and all sorts. At release, the developer is planning to have online play, additional game modes, plenty of maps and weapons, AI enemies and the list goes on. The demo is just a small slice of what to expect.

  • RimWorld gets a big 1.2 update out with lots more options to tweak your game

    The brilliant colony-building sim RimWorld has another mega post-release update available now, with content included for both the base game and the Royalty expansion.

    Looking over the changelog, which is as long as expected, it sounds excellent. RimWorld has gained a whole new way to tweak your experience with a "custom playstyle system", which allows you to adjust a large number of settings to how you want your game to be. So you could make it a lot easier and more of a building sim and less of a "oh my god everyone is going to die from raiders" sim. There's also a bunch of new visual effects and many new sound effects added in for free too. There's loads more, especially for the Royalty DLC like an entirely new major quest that involves defending a damaged shuttle or assaulting a bandit camp.

  • Competitive platform-jumper 'Jumpala' reveals new character, getting a free version

    Jumpala is an upcoming fast-paced competitive platformer that sees you constantly hopping across tiny little pads, it's actually brilliant fun and they've done a few new reveals recently.

    When you think about platformers, traditionally this would mean running along different floors, a little tricky jumping here and there and perhaps various enemy encounters. Jumpala is none of that. Instead, the whole arena scrolls upwards with small platforms each player needs to jump across, to turn it into their colour before it drops of the screen. It's highly competitive and from the early builds we played—a huge amount of fun.

  • Hilarious slapstick comedy game West of Loathing had an anniversary update

    Three years after launching, Asymmetric have given West of Loathing a big anniversary update to get rid of some issues and add in some silly new content. Even their version numbering is ridiculous, with this being update v1.11.11.11.1.

    From the creators of the browser-based comedy MMORPG Kingdom of Loathing, don't let the stick figures and super-simple style fool you, this is a great game worthy of your time and it's definitely funny. Easily on of 2017's best indie games. This is where you get to pick a character class between a Cow Puncher, a Beanslinger and a Snake Oiler so you know you're in a for a wild ride right away.

  • Check out the new trailer and demo for the sci-fi puzzle platformer Transmogrify

    Your facility appears to be overrun by strange creatures, with a forgetful research AI trying to help you escape but you do at least have a gun that can turn creatures into useful objects. This is Transmogrify, an upcoming sci-fi platformer that was partly funded on Kickstarter a few years back.

Games: Epic Store, 9 Monkeys and Tiny Teams Festival

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Gaming
  • Challenging co-op dungeon crawler 'Barony' gets Linux Steam and Epic Store crossplay

    Recently, the first-person dungeon crawling roguelike Barony had a bit of an upgrade along with a release on the Epic Store and that came with crossplay.

    "Barony is the premier first-person roguelike RPG with cooperative play. Cryptic items, brutal traps and devious monsters, like those found in classic roguelikes and CRPGs, await you. Conquer the dungeon alone, or gather a perfect party in co-op with iconic and exotic RPG classes."

  • Get ready to beat 'em up as 9 Monkeys of Shaolin releases in October

    9 Monkeys of Shaolin is an upcoming beat 'em up from Sobaka Studio, what they claim will mark the "true rebirth of the iconic beat 'em up genre in vein of old-school video games".

    We've been waiting on this for quite some time now after being announced back in 2018. They've now confirmed it will see a release on October 16.

  • The 'Tiny Teams Festival' on Steam shines a light on micro studios

    Tiny Teams Festival, a little sale and event page went live on Steam recently to showcase a bunch of micro-teams and their games and there's a few fun picks there.

    Run by Yogscast Games, a YouTube / Twitch group that have turned to publishing indie games. So you could compare this little Steam event to other publisher-focused sales although this includes plenty not published by Yogscast. It's interesting for us, because smaller teams are what make up a large majority of games supported on Linux. They're the ones who most need our support too and so it's nice to highlight some good stuff they make.

Games RPCS3, NeuroSlicers and More

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Gaming

           

  • Darkest Dungeon - The Butcher's Circus due for Linux 'in the next week or so'

    Red Hook Studios are currently working on the free DLC The Butcher's Circus and with Season 2 about to release, the Linux (and macOS) versions are just about ready.

    To be clear, Darkest Dungeon is already on Linux but the updates to support this brand new competitive game mode are not. Red Hook Studios have been pretty clear on it for some time that it would come later, and they mentioned in early July about it being close but they wanted to ensure they're ready for release.

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  • PlayStation 3 emulator RPCS3 gains online play with PSN Emulation

    It seems a very exciting development will be coming to the next release of the PlayStation 3 emulator RPCS3.

    While they haven't done a blog post to go over their progress since 2019, work is as always ongoing. The main reason they don't often talk about progress, is simply a lack of people to go over it all and blog about it for them.

    Thankfully though, they do release videos to show off and talk about some of the major progress. One such brand new feature coming is online play via PSN Emulation. That is absolutely huge especially since online features were such a major part of some games.

  • Upcoming 'post-cyberpunk' RTS NeuroSlicers looks great, Steam page up

    NeuroSlicers is an upcoming in-development real-time strategy game that aims to 'modernize' the genre with a 'post-cyberpunk' setting and it's looking slick.

    "Instead of seeing how fast you can click, NeuroSlicers tasks you with how fast you can think. Using intelligent AI-powered units, you are free to make more significant, more strategic decisions that focus on territory control, resource management, upgrading and careful placement of customizable buildings, units and powerful function abilities called Scripts."

    It's been quite a long time since we last covered it, while also keeping an eye on their progress. They've now announced that their Steam page has finally gone live as they continue their very early testing period. While this 'pre-alpha' is currently limited to supporting Windows, they confirmed to GOL on Twitter that a Linux release continues to be planned.

  • Neverwinter Nights: Enhanced Edition gets more graphical upgrades

    Beamdog are really starting to put the Enhanced into Neverwinter Nights: Enhanced Edition and showing just how much they care about the classic RPG experiences as a studio.

    A fresh development build for Neverwinter Nights: Enhanced Edition went up recently with a brand new Lighting Engine and the difference it makes is quite ridiculous. They said their aim with this is to "allow much higher quality future content, but also in large to enhance the visual quality of existing content" and since pictures say more than a thousand words they showed quite a few examples. 

Software and Games: Cloud Hypervisor, Joplin, Kodi, MuseScore, Bashtop, Grounded

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Gaming

  • Intel Cloud-Hypervisor 0.9 Brings io_uring Block Device Support For Faster Performance

    Intel's Cloud Hypervisor focused on being a Rustlang-based hypervisor focused for cloud workloads is closing in on the 1.0 milestone. With this week's release of Cloud-Hypervisor 0.9 there is one very exciting feature in particular but also a lot of other interesting changes. 

  • Joplin

    Joplin is a free, open source note taking and to-do application, which can handle a large number of notes organised into notebooks. The notes are searchable, can be copied, tagged and modified either from the applications directly or from your own text editor. The notes are in Markdown format.
    Notes exported from Evernote via .enex files can be imported into Joplin, including the formatted content (which is converted to Markdown), resources (images, attachments, etc.) and complete metadata (geolocation, updated time, created time, etc.). Plain Markdown files can also be imported.
    The notes can be synchronized with various cloud services including Nextcloud, Dropbox, OneDrive, WebDAV or the file system (for example with a network directory). When synchronizing the notes, notebooks, tags and other metadata are saved to plain text files which can be easily inspected, backed up and moved around.

  •          

  • Kodi 19 Alpha 1 Released With AV1 Decoding, Many Other HTPC Improvements

    Kodi 19 "Matrix" Alpha 1 has been released for this very popular, cross-platform open-source HTPC software. 

    Kodi 19 is bringing many exciting improvements as a major update to this open-source home theater software. 

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  • Scorewriter MuseScore 3.5 Released with Chord Symbol Playback

    MuseScore, free music composition and notation software, released version 3.5 with long list of new features, bug fixes, and other improvements.

    MuseScore 3.5 contains one of the most requested features: Chord Symbol Playback. The feature is disabled by default so far. You can enable it by going to Edit > Preferences > Note Input.

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  • Bashtop: An Htop Like System Monitor But Much More Useful

    As cool as Htop there is one thing that it's seriously lacking in and that is system monitoring tools, this may not be a problem for you but if you want a system monitor than bashtop is a much better option to choose, it let's you do most of the process management stuff that you want from htop but it comes with things like hard drive usage, network usage and cpu usage statistics. 

  • An Early Look at Grounded

    You’re in control of a child, who looks like he/she hasn’t entered the teenager years just yet. Among four different children — two boys and two girls — they’ve got a big problem: they’ve been shrunk to the size of an insect. Join them in their adventure — either by yourself or with a group of online friends — as they fight to survive in someone’s backyard, trying to build shelters whilst defending against bugs, and figure out why they’ve shrunk in the first place. Enter Grounded, developed by Obsidian Entertainment — the studio that brought us such titles as Pillars of Eternity, The Outer Worlds, and Star Wars: KOTOR2.

RetroArch 1.9 Released with Many Goodies for Retro Linux Gamers

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Linux
Gaming

If you are a hardcore retro gamer, RetroArch is what you want to install on your GNU/Linux distribution to enjoy those awesome cool retro games that you probably played all day long when you were young.

The latest release, RetroArch 1.9 is a massive one, bringing lots of goodies for retro gamers. Highlights include a new Explore View for all playlists, which lets you search for content based on various criteria, such as genre, origin, publisher, system, release year, developer, and amount of players.

The developers note the fact that the new Explore View will only display search results based on the content that’s already included in your playlists. Also, the metadata is not yet complete.

Read more

Games: Dying Light - Hellraid, Bridge Constructor, Railway Empire, Making it Home

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Gaming
  • Techland confirm Dying Light Hellraid will see plenty of updates post-release

    Dying Light - Hellraid is the upcoming DLC that swaps Zombies for Skeletons and turns Dying Light into something of a dungeon crawler. It's exciting and it's going to continually get updates after release.

    Reminder: the DLC is inspired by and using some ideas from Hellraid, which was originally going to be a standalone first-person co-op slasher. Techland appear to have shelved it completely so they're making sure it didn't all go to waste this way. I'm pretty happy about it because if there's one thing I want, it's more Dying Light content.

  • The Bridge Constructor series is now up on GOG with a nice big sale

    A little building for the weekend perhaps? The Bridge Constructor series has appeared on GOG and there's a sweet discount deal going where you could get the first game free.

    The newly DRM-free released titles on GOG are: Bridge Constructor, Bridge Constructor Medieval and Bridge Constructor Portal. I don't think any of these games really need an introduction do they? The name along pretty much speaks for itself. Each of them has a slightly different take on what you do but the end result is the same. You get to build bridges, and watch as your glorious creations fail repeatedly.

    [...]

    I had a huge amount of fun with Bridge Constructor Portal, as the portal system definitely makes it feel different to the previous entries and to other similar such games.

  • Railway Empire gets a Complete Collection out now

    All aboard the DLC train! Kalypso Media and in-house developer Gaming Minds Studios today put the brakes on Railway Empire, with a proper Complete Collection now available.

    This is because the team has moved onto another game, so Railway Empire should be considered actually finished now, apart from perhaps a few standard patches that may come in future. Since release in early 2018 it's been through 13 free updates, 8 extensive DLCs spanning iconic locations such as the Rocky Mountains, Sweden and Mexico, and brought to life 83 historically authentic locomotives. Kalypso claim this collection which bundles all DLC with the main game offer up "the most comprehensive railway tycoon experience currently available on PC and consoles".

  • Quirky vehicle building game 'Making it Home' is now in Early Access

    Making it Home looks so bizarre that I feel like I just need to give it a go. You're a ladybug building a vehicle to travel from one side of America to the other.

    Yes, a ladybug. I did say it looks bizarre. Even the developer thinks their idea is weird. They said it's "kinda Oregon Trail meets Banjo Kazooie Nuts and Bolts with a bit of Far Lone Sails - and a smoking crab and bear - with carrots and peas - and honey... and dehumidifiers". Are we any clearer? No but it looks a bit amusing. The point is to build a big Rube Goldberg styled contraption, then platformer all over it to interact with it and collect stuff along the way.

  • Perspective illusion puzzler THE IMPOSSIBLE is out now

    Inspired by designs from MC Escher, THE IMPOSSIBLE is a game about moving a box around crazy shapes. Note: key provided by the developer.

    Taking the visuals and gameplay, you could compare it directly with hocus from 2015 but Airem have put their own slightly quirky take on it, complete with a GLaDOS-inspired narrator to prod you along. Using simple controls, all you need to do is get the the box across the shape you're given onto the red square. Doing so is not always easy, due to the perspective. It's not impossible of course but it is challenging.

    This is not your typical shape puzzle game though, this cheeky GLaDOS sounding AI that comments on your progress also messes with you. There's some intentional glitches and errors that flash around on certain levels to interrupt you. Quite funny actually the way it's done and it's not over the top either, you're even told if you "obey the rules, you'll get Steam Achievements" in a glitched-out voice with the audio going from all relaxing to properly mysterious.

  • Len's Island plans to blend together peaceful building with intense dungeon exploration

    Len's Island sounds like quite a peculiar mix. Blending together peaceful building, farming and crafting, mixed with intense combat, dungeon battles and deep questing and exploration. We've got plenty of games that do either side of the coin with building or dungeon crawling but both together? I'm eager to see how that will all work. Even more so because of the setting and the lovely colourful style it provides.

    "Len's Island brings excitement and progression for many playstyles, all within a vibrant and engaging world. Catering to the hardcore dungeon-crawler fans, home-builders and decorators, explorers and completionists, farming fanatics, collectable hoarders, and people who just want to live the simple life chopping trees as the sun goes down."

  • Google adds Free Weekends to Stadia starting with Borderlands 3

    Google's game streaming service Stadia continues to gradually roll out new features, one of which went up yesterday with Free Weekends now being a thing. Plus, another round-up on recent Stadia info.

    I'm surprised it actually took this long. Free Weekends are a great way to trial games, and something Steam has been doing for quite a long time now. Partly thanks to demos at some point becoming more of a rarity. The thing is, for a game streaming service like this it makes a whole lot more sense, since there's no lengthy initial downloads. You can jump in practically instantly and see if you like it and play a good few hours. Then perhaps buy it.

  • Counter-Strike: Global Offensive gets fancy new skins, networking improvements

    Valve continue to tweak their classic free to play shooter Counter-Strike: Global Offensive. The latest update improves various parts of the game and there's some fancy new weapon skins.

    Trusted Mode, the newer feature that's just one small part of their fight against cheating now has the "-untrusted" launch argument removed. Trusted Mode on Linux also now appears to be on by default, so you no longer need the quick fix we wrote about recently, so if you missed that you should find your CS:GO games on Linux to be a lot nicer. Valve also fixed several exploits related to VPK tampering.

    For collectors, a new Fracture Collection weapons case went up so you can gamble away some of your monies on their loot box system. This new case features designs from over 17 different community artists and there's even Shattered Web Knives as rare special items. Looking over the Steam Market, there's already tons on there from it so if you're after something really specific you might just be able to grab it right away there.

  • Core Defense developer 'completely blown away' by first week Steam sales

    After launching on July 31, Core Defense from developer ehmprah appears to have done quite well to the point that they've been 'blown away' by the sales numbers.

    What is Core Defense? It's a tower defense game, that mixes in a little more randomness than you might expect. You pick towers and upgrades from a set a cards after each wave, and gradually build up a maze to force enemies to travel through. See our previous thoughts here—it's good!

    This cross-platform release (Linux, macOS, Windows) managed to cut through the noise, with the first week hitting 2,546 units and grossed $20,186 on Steam. Compared with 106 units and grossed $1,144 on itch.io during the Early Access phase it did there. Interestingly, despite Steam Wishlists often being said to be what makes or breaks games, they said only 26% of sales came from wishlist conversions. They also had around 8% refunded, which sounds pretty good so overall the managed to net $17,029 before Steam's own cut.

  • Braid is getting a much upgraded Anniversary Edition releasing in 2021

    Braid, the indie puzzle-platformer from Jonathan Blow is getting a huge overhaul with a new Anniversary Edition that's due out sometime in 2021. It's something of a classic and became quite a big hit, it was also one of the early bigger indie titles to come to Linux.

    Sounds like it's going to be a massive improvement, which includes David Hellman returning to do the repainting. Extra animations are in, upgraded sound effects and music and so on. They explained the point was to upgrade it and not do a "Star Wars Special Edition" to change how some things were done to the story. There's even going to be a toggle to switch between old and new which is always fun to play with in a game. Developer commentary is also going to be in, with their plan to have it as the "craziest, most-in-depth commentary ever put in a video game".

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More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

IBM/Red Hat/Fedora Leftovers

  • The modern developer experience

    We hear from many clients that developer productivity and efficiency continue to be pain points. Cloud adoption can help normalize developer experiences across application stacks and runtimes. The path and steps for your developers to push code should be clear, simple, and easy to implement, even on Day 1. The modern developer experience provides a unified and normalized practice with modern tools. Developers thrive in the inner loop where unit tests and code come together, and in a penalty-free runtime execution environment where no one gets hurt, no processes take down precious workloads, and no one knows that it took 20 minutes to resolve that pesky runtime error. The inner loop occurs in a developer workspace that is easy to set up, manage, prepare, maintain, and, more importantly, easy to allocate. If a new developer is added to your squad, they can have all of the mechanical things they need to push code changes into the pipeline on their first day. An important part of the modern developer experience is expressed as Red Hat CodeReady Workspaces, which provides a set of constructs to provision a developer workspace in the cloud where they can perform their inner loop. A save action to a workspace file initiates an inner loop build in their local workspace, and an endpoint for the developer to see their changes quickly.

  • Call for Code Daily: Grillo, and how your code can help

    The power of Call for Code® is in the global community that we have built around this major #TechforGood initiative. Whether it is the deployments that are underway across pivotal projects, developers leveraging the starter kits in the cloud, or ecosystem partners joining the fight, everyone has a story to tell. Call for Code Daily highlights all the amazing #TechforGood stories taking place around the world. Every day, you can count on us to share these stories with you. Check out the stories from the week of August 10th:

  • Culture of Innovation and Collaboration: Hybrid Cloud, Privacy in AI and Data Caching

    Red Hat is continually innovating and part of that innovation includes researching and striving to solve the problems our customers face. That innovation is driven through the Office of the CTO and includes OpenShift, OpenShift Container Storage and use cases such as the hybrid cloud, privacy concerns in AI, and data caching. We recently interviewed Hugh Brock, research director for the office of the CTO, here at Red Hat about these very topics.

  • Fedora program update: 2020-33

    Here’s your report of what has happened in Fedora this week. Fedora 33 has branched from Rawhide. Please update the Release Readiness page with your team’s status. I have weekly office hours in #fedora-meeting-1. Drop by if you have any questions or comments about the schedule, Changes, elections, or anything else.

  • Fedora Magazine: Come test a new release of pipenv, the Python development tool

    Pipenv is a tool that helps Python developers maintain isolated virtual environments with specifacally defined set of dependencies to achieve reproducible development and deployment environments. It is similar to tools for different programming languages, such as bundler, composer, npm, cargo, yarn, etc. A new version of pipenv, 2020.6.2, has been recently released. It is now available in Fedora 33 and rawhide. For older Fedoras, the maintainers decided to package it in COPR to be tested first. So come try it out, before they push it into stable Fedora versions. The new version doesn’t bring any fancy new features, but after two years of development it fixes a lot of problems and does many things differently under the hood. What worked for you previously should continue to work, but might behave slightly differently.

  • Introduction to cloud-native CI/CD with Tekton (KubeCon Europe 2020)

    If you’re interested in cloud-native CI/CD and Tekton but haven’t had a chance to get hands-on with the technology yet, the KubeCon Europe Virtual event provides an opportunity to do that. Tekton is a powerful and flexible open source framework for creating cloud-native CI/CD pipelines. It integrates with Kubernetes and allows developers to build, test, and deploy across multiple cloud providers and on-premises clusters as shown in Figure 1.

  • Introduction to Strimzi: Apache Kafka on Kubernetes (KubeCon Europe 2020)

    Apache Kafka has emerged as the leading platform for building real-time data pipelines. Born as a messaging system, mainly for the publish/subscribe pattern, Kafka has established itself as a data-streaming platform for processing data in real-time. Today, Kafka is also heavily used for developing event-driven applications, enabling the services in your infrastructure to communicate with each other through events using Apache Kafka as the backbone. Meanwhile, cloud-native application development is gathering more traction thanks to Kubernetes. Thanks to the abstraction layer provided by this platform, it’s easy to move your applications from running on bare metal to any cloud provider (AWS, Azure, GCP, IBM, and so on) enabling hybrid-cloud scenarios as well. But how do you move your Apache Kafka workloads to the cloud? It’s possible, but it’s not simple. You could learn all of the Apache Kafka tools for handling a cluster well enough to move your Kafka workloads to Kubernetes, or you could leverage the Kubernetes knowledge you already have using Strimzi.

  • OpenShift for Kubernetes developers: Getting started

    If you are familiar with containers and Kubernetes, you have likely heard of the enterprise features that Red Hat OpenShift brings to this platform. In this article, I introduce developers familiar with Kubernetes to OpenShift’s command-line features and native extension API resources, including build configurations, deployment configurations, and image streams.

  • Man-DB Brings Documentation to IBM i

    IBM i developers who have a question about how a particular command or feature works in open source packages now have an easy way to look up documentations, thanks to the addition of support for the Man-DB utility in IBM i, which IBM unveiled in late July. Man-DB is an open source implementation of the standard Unix documentation system. It provides a mechanism for easily accessing the documentation that exists for open source packages, such as the Node.js language, or even for commands, like Curl. The software, which can be installed via YUM, only works with open source software on IBM i at the moment; it doesn’t support native programs or commands.

  • Making open decisions in five steps

    The group's leader made a decision, and everyone else accepted it. The leader may have been a manager, a team lead, or the alpha in a social group. Was that decision the best one for the group? Did it take all relevant factors into account? It didn’t really matter, because people didn’t want to buck authority and face the ramifications. But this behavior was typical of life in hierarchical systems.

  • 7 tips for giving and receiving better feedback

Wine 5.15 and Beyond

  • Wine Announcement
    The Wine development release 5.15 is now available.
    
    
    
    
    What's new in this release (see below for details):
      - Initial implementation of the XACT Engine libraries.
      - Beginnings of a math library in MSVCRT based on Musl.
      - Still more restructuration of the console support.
      - Direct Input performance improvements.
      - Exception handling fixes on x86-64.
      - Various bug fixes.
    
    
    
    
    The source is available from the following locations:
    
    
    
    
      https://dl.winehq.org/wine/source/5.x/wine-5.15.tar.xz
      http://mirrors.ibiblio.org/wine/source/5.x/wine-5.15.tar.xz
    
    
    
    
    Binary packages for various distributions will be available from:
    
    
    
    
      https://www.winehq.org/download
    
    
    
    
    You will find documentation on https://www.winehq.org/documentation
    
    
    
    
    You can also get the current source directly from the git
    repository. Check https://www.winehq.org/git for details.
    
    
    
    
    Wine is available thanks to the work of many people. See the file
    AUTHORS in the distribution for the complete list.
    
  • Wine 5.15 Release Brings Initial Work On XACT Engine Libraries

    Wine 5.15 is out as the latest bi-weekly development snapshot for this program allowing Windows games/applications to generally run quite gracefully on Linux and other platforms. 

  •        
  • Wine Developer Begins Experimenting With macOS ARM64 Support

    Over the months ahead with Apple preparing future desktops/laptops with their in-house Apple silicon built on the ARM 64-bit architecture, Wine developers are beginning to eye how to support these future 64-bit ARM systems with macOS Big Sur.  Wine developer Martin Storsjo has been experimenting with the macOS + ARM64 support and has got the code along far enough that "small test executables" can run on the patched copy of Wine. 

Wandboard IMX8M-Plus SBC debuts AI-enabled i.MX8M Plus

echNexion’s “Wandboard IMX8M-Plus” SBC runs Linux or Android on NXP’s new i.MX8M Plus with 2.3-TOPS NPU. Pre-orders go for $134 with 2GB RAM or $159 with 4GB and WiFi/BT, both with 32GB and M.2 with NVMe. In January, NXP announced its i.MX8M Plus — its first i.MX8 SoC with an NPU for AI acceleration — but so far the only product we’ve seen based on it is a briefly teased Verdin iMX8M Plus module from Toradex. Now, TechNexion has opened pre-orders for a Wandboard IMX8M-Plus SBC based on a SODIMM-style “EDM SOM” module equipped with the i.MX8M Plus. Read more