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3 Non-Linux sites I like

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Thoughts: Where is Linux Going?

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My first ventures into Linux were way back in 1995 with a copy of Red Hat, and i'll put my hands up, i just didn't get it, command line, when Windows had a GUI, nothing seemed to work, and a strange command set, but even back then, not understanding Linux, and wondering what the fuss was about, i will say, i was very aware of what this ment to the industry, and knew it was important.

Why do smart people act like an idiot behind a PC?

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Most people these days have a computer, or at least sat behind one.

The concept with most OS GUI’s (operating systems graphical user interface) is the same.

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Seagate and I

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How many distros do you think you can have installed simultaneously without the scare of space crunch on your hard drive?

Why the world isn't ready for Linux

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I'm a firm believer, that in order to own a PC, you should have to take lessons, and a test, to get a licence, there seem to be plenty of people willing to do this to drive to work, if you don't, then your PC experience, should be limited, as it would do if your driving a car, to a 50cc Moped of an experience. And i think i'm not the only one, as this is what the "Cloud computing" experience is serving up..

The State of UK Terrestrial Web TV

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So what i'd like to do here, is round up the offerings of the main 5 TV channels, what i'm looking for, is the following, how do they work on the following platforms. WindowsXP, Ubuntu 8.10 and Mac OSX Tiger. I'm using XP and not vista, because i believe there are more XP installs out there. i'll use firefox as the browser of choice to keep the browser the same across all browsers, however will also give the default browser for each OS a go as well, just to see how different the experience is.

You Tried OpenOffice.org. Where do we go from here?

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Over the last four days, we have been taking a tour of OpenOffice.org Writer. We have explored some of its features which may feel familiar to you, as well as looking at some features which may give you a whole new way of working.

How did you find the journey? If you haven’t taken time to sit down in front of your computer and actually follow the tutorials step by step, consider doing that now. Most people learn much better by doing rather than just reading.

The main thing to remember is to stick with it. Even if certain procedures feel awkward or foreign to begin with, they will become much more natural over time. For anything more complicated than a simple letter, I encourage you to start using styles. Styles will unlock the power of OpenOffice.org like nothing else will. Start with paragraph styles, and go from there.

Try OpenOffice.org. Exploring the Difference.

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Having looked at ways in which OpenOffice.org will be familiar to you, we now turn to explore some of its differences.

Screen Layout

In the following screenshot, we identify four important tools – dockable floating windows - that can be used very powerfully in OpenOffice.org.

The Styles and Formatting window, which we looked at earlier, is useful for quick formatting. I tend to keep it open most of the time, though it can be quickly shown and hidden by clicking F11.

From the Styles and Formatting pane, you have access to all paragraph, character, frame, page and list styles. A drop down control at the bottom of the pane allows you to display more or less styles.

For example, if you select “Applied Styles”, you will only see the list of styles you have used in the current document.

The Navigator shows you an overview of your document – like a table of contents – and allows you to quickly move around the document.

If you have used heading styles for all of your headings, you see a handy outline of your document under “Headings”. You can also see lists of all of your tables, text frames, graphics and other objects throughout the document.

You jump quickly to a certain point in your document by double clicking on the item in the list. By pressing F5, you can easily display or hide this panel.

I'm Trying OpenOffice.org. How do I learn more?

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Yesterday we looked at the similarities between OpenOffice.org Writer and the word processor you are already familiar with - whether that is Microsoft Word or something else. It’s reassuring to know that some things feel familiar.

But it’s also nice to get below the surface and learn something new. You might be a fiddler, and feel your way through the program by trial and error. Or you might like to use some of the many resources available on the Internet.

If you’ve already had a look around the program, you might also be wondering where all of the clipart, templates and other resources are.

OpenOffice.org has a very strong and supportive community made up of users, developers, organisations and companies. There is a huge amount of support and resources available for OpenOffice.org on the Net. But finding these resources can be quite a challenge. Here is a brief introduction to some of the most important and useful OpenOffice.org projects and support sites.

Try OpenOffice.org. It's the Same But It's Different

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Part 2 of a 5 part series.

At the beginning of our journey, I’d like to reassure you. While OpenOffice.org is different in many ways – in look, function and philosophy – it will also be very familiar to you in other ways.In fact, if you download quick reference cards for OpenOffice.org Writer and Microsoft Word, you may be surprised at the similarities.

Let’s start our journey by exploring some of the features that are common to other word processors.

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More in Tux Machines

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Noctua NH-L9a-AM4: A Very Low-Profile AMD Ryzen Cooler

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LLVM 9.0.0 released

It's my great pleasure to announce that LLVM 9 is now available. Get it here: https://llvm.org/releases/download.html#9.0.0 This release is the result of the LLVM community's work over the past six months (up to trunk r366426 plus commits on the branch). Some highlights include: - Support for asm goto, enabling for example the mainline Linux kernel for x86_64 to build with Clang - The RISCV-V target is no longer experimental, but built by default - Experimental support for C++ for OpenCL as well as many bug fixes, optimizations, and diagnostics improvements. Read more