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Linux 3.17-rc5

Filed under
Linux

So I should probably have delayed this until Wednesday for sentimental
reasons: that will be 23 years since I uploaded the 0.01 source tree.
But I'm not an overly sentimental person, so screw that. I'm doing my
normal Sunday release.

And as I mentioned in the rc4 notes, the previous rc was pretty small,
possibly because neither Greg nor Davem had sent in any updates that
week. Guess what? David's networking updates came in an hour after I
did rc4, and sure enough Greg came in this week too, so - surprise
surprise - rc5 isn't as small as rc4 was.

Oh well. It was too good to last.

I also got a report of an *old* performance regression in the dentry
cache (since 3.10 - positively ancient), and that in turn made me look
around some more, and there were a few other special cases that could
cause us to not do as well as we should. I fixed some of it, and Al
fixed the rest. So hopefully we not only fixed the reported
regression, but are actually doing better than we used to.

Anyway, the size of rc5 means that I'm certainly not cutting the
release early, which means that I will have to think about exactly
what I will do about the next merge window. Because it looks like it
might end up conflicting with my travel around LinuxCon EU. I haven't
quite decided what I'll do - I might release 3.17 normally, but then
just not open the merge window due to travel. Or, if there are more
issues than I think there will be, maybe I'll delay the 3.17 release.

We'll see.

Regardless - the rc5 changes is about half drivers (networking, gpu,
usb, input, ata..) with the rest being mostly a mix of filesystem
updates (the aforementioned performance thing in the core vfs layer,
but also some NFS export issues found by Al and misc other stuff),
architecture updates (arm, parisc, s390) and core networking. And a
smattering of other. Shortlog appended.

In other words, things look fairly normal, even if I'd have been
happier with rc5 being smaller. But with the bump from networking and
drivers, I'm not going to claim that this was either unexpected or
particularly scary. I'm hoping we're done now, and that rc6 and rc7
will be noticeably calmer.

Knock wood.

Linus

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Torvalds says he has no strong opinions on systemd

Filed under
Linux
Interviews

Linux creator Linus Torvalds is well-known for his strong opinions on many technical things. But when it comes to systemd, the init system that has caused a fair degree of angst in the Linux world, Torvalds is neutral.

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Hello World: Videos That Teach Linux To Kids

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Recently, they launched a new series, “Superusers: The Legendary GNU/Linux Show,” which stars Aramis, a gnu who bares a strange resemblance to Richard Stallman, and a penguin named Adelie. The pilot episode for this series, called “Help,” deals with the Linux command by the same name and features some clever wordplay, utilizing lyrics from the old Beatles song. This would be in keeping with the brothers’ idea of making sure their videos appeal to kids and adults alike.

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SK Telecom to Open a New “Do-it-yourself” Era in Network Equipment

Filed under
Linux

The network operating system will be based on Linux, with that solution that can offer a variety of features such as switching, routing, load balancing, firewall, and distributed denial-of-service. In addition, network virtualization, software-defined network controller, and other related features will be made available. Atto Research, the specialist in software-defined networking, will take the job of development work.

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SystemRescueCd 4.3.1 Is a Powerful and Easy to Use Recovery OS

Filed under
GNU
Linux

François Dupoux said that a new release of his popular SystemRescueCd Linux-based operating system for rescue and recovery tasks has been made available, and the latest version now ready for download is 4.3.1.

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"Evil" Linux Users Teach Mac OS X Fans How to Improve and Destroy Their System

Filed under
Linux
Mac

Apple systems are actually Unix-based, which means that numerous features that you find in a Linux OS are also present in Mac OS X. This is also true for various commands that can be used in a terminal.

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On normal people using linux, part 3

Filed under
Linux

Another friend approached me to get rid of Windows, the problem was vulnerabilities and virus. She was an artist for life and paint, so I explained to her that Adobe no more and she didn’t really feel moved by that so I tougth “hm… this can work out”.

So, I got archl inux[1] installed on her computer, explained her a bit of the stuff and told her “anything you need, just ask.”, strangelly, nothing she asked for one month, and since I had moved from jobs to another state, I tougth that she had come back to the windows-side of the force. “Hey annya?”, “Hey”, “How are things up there with linux?”, “Well, it’s great actually. I’m using windows only to play LoL”, “oh, cool, I tougth you hade come back to windows because you never asked me anything, actually”, “No, that wiki that you pointed me out is really good. so I started reading it a lot, and krita, OH GOD. that program is amazing.”

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Enjoy Five Gorgeous Linux Desktops from the Google+ Community

Filed under
Linux
Google

Linux is a very customizable ecosystem and this is one of the main features of the open source world, the possibility to do almost anything you want with your OS. Every Friday, the Linux community shows its desktops on Google+, so we picked up a few of the most interesting to share with everyone.

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BMW Show off how you remote control the BMW i3 electric car with your Tizen Gear 2 / S Smartwatch

Filed under
Linux

The car is not simply something that you sit in to get from A to B. Now it is technically an extension of you and integrates with your wrist. Previously we have shown you OnStar remote controlling a Chevrolet car, well now at IFA 2014 it was BMW’s turn to show off their BMW i3 electric car, and also show what Samsung Gear 2 and Gear S users could do with their Tizen based Smartwatches.

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Italy: High Court shoots down Windows tax

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft

Italy's High Court has struck a blow to the practice of forcing non-free software on buyers of PCs and laptops. According to La Repubblica, the court ruled on Thursday that a laptop buyer was entitled to receive a refund for the price of the Microsoft Windows license on his computer.

The judges sharply criticised the practice of selling PCs only together with a non-free operating system as "a commercial policy of forced distribution". The court slammed this practice as "monopolistic in tendency". It also highlighted that the practice of bundling means that end users are forced into using additional non-free applications due to compatibility and interoperability issues, whether they wanted these programs or not.

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Linux 3.17-rc5

So I should probably have delayed this until Wednesday for sentimental reasons: that will be 23 years since I uploaded the 0.01 source tree. But I'm not an overly sentimental person, so screw that. I'm doing my normal Sunday release. And as I mentioned in the rc4 notes, the previous rc was pretty small, possibly because neither Greg nor Davem had sent in any updates that week. Guess what? David's networking updates came in an hour after I did rc4, and sure enough Greg came in this week too, so - surprise surprise - rc5 isn't as small as rc4 was. Oh well. It was too good to last. I also got a report of an *old* performance regression in the dentry cache (since 3.10 - positively ancient), and that in turn made me look around some more, and there were a few other special cases that could cause us to not do as well as we should. I fixed some of it, and Al fixed the rest. So hopefully we not only fixed the reported regression, but are actually doing better than we used to. Anyway, the size of rc5 means that I'm certainly not cutting the release early, which means that I will have to think about exactly what I will do about the next merge window. Because it looks like it might end up conflicting with my travel around LinuxCon EU. I haven't quite decided what I'll do - I might release 3.17 normally, but then just not open the merge window due to travel. Or, if there are more issues than I think there will be, maybe I'll delay the 3.17 release. We'll see. Regardless - the rc5 changes is about half drivers (networking, gpu, usb, input, ata..) with the rest being mostly a mix of filesystem updates (the aforementioned performance thing in the core vfs layer, but also some NFS export issues found by Al and misc other stuff), architecture updates (arm, parisc, s390) and core networking. And a smattering of other. Shortlog appended. In other words, things look fairly normal, even if I'd have been happier with rc5 being smaller. But with the bump from networking and drivers, I'm not going to claim that this was either unexpected or particularly scary. I'm hoping we're done now, and that rc6 and rc7 will be noticeably calmer. Knock wood. Linus Read more

Torvalds says he has no strong opinions on systemd

Linux creator Linus Torvalds is well-known for his strong opinions on many technical things. But when it comes to systemd, the init system that has caused a fair degree of angst in the Linux world, Torvalds is neutral. Read more