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GNU
Linux
BSD
  • OpenMandriva Is Going To Do Away With 32-bit Support

    Following in the steps of Ubuntu 17.10 dropping 32-bit desktop images and other Linux distributions also lessening their focus on 32-bit support, OpenMandriva has issued its final i586 release.

    OpenMandriva Lx 3.03 was released on Tuesday with boot speed improvements, updates to Linux/systemd/Mesa, KDE Plasma 5.10.5, LLVM Clang 5.0, and other package upgrades. This is also going to be their last planned release in the OpenMandriva Lx 3 series.

  • OpenMandriva Lx 3.03 - Get it while it’s hot!

    This release Lx 3.03 is an enhancement and upgrade to the previous Lx 3 releases.

  • LXLE 16.04.3 "Eclectica" Linux Distro Is Out Now Based on Ubuntu 16.04.3 LTS

    The developers of the Ubuntu-based LXLE GNU/Linux distribution have announced the release of LXLE 16.04.3, the latest update to the Eclectica series based on Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus).

    Incorporating all the updates and core components of Ubuntu 16.04.3 LTS, the LXLE 16.04.3 release is here to further integrate various of the components of the MATE and LXQt desktop environments, as well as some from the Linux Mint operating system.

    On top of that, the application menu received improvements to its layout and how items are organization, the system theme was tweaked for consistency, LXhotkey replaces the Obkey Openbox key editor, and Pithos has been removed because it required a user account.

  • pfSense 2.4.2 Open-Source Firewall Patches OpenSSL, Improves Network Performance

    Netgate's Jim Pingle announced the availability of the second maintenance and stabilization update to the latest 2.4 series of pfSense, world's most trusted open-source firewall.

    pfSense 2.4.2 is a security and bugfix release that updates the OpenSSL packages to version 1.0.2m to fix two recently disclosed vulnerabilities (CVE-2017-3736 and CVE-2017-3735), addresses three potential XSS vectors, fixes the VLAN priority handling, and addresses issues with PPP interfaces that have VLAN parents.

Linux 4.10 To Linux 4.15 Kernel Benchmarks

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

The ThinkPad X1 Carbon has been enjoying its time on Linux 4.15. In addition to the recent boot time tests and kernel power comparison, here are some raw performance benchmarks looking at the speed from Linux 4.10 through Linux 4.15 Git.

With this Broadwell-era Core i7 5600U laptop with 8GB RAM, HD Graphics, and 128GB SATA 3.0 SSD with Ubuntu 17.10 x86_64, the Linux 4.10 through 4.15 Git mainline kernels were benchmarked. Each one was tested "out of the box" and the kernel builds were obtained from the Ubuntu Mainline Kernel archive.

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TheSSS (Smallest Server Suite) Linux OS Receives Latest MariaDB & Apache Servers

Filed under
Linux

TheSSS 23.1 is a small update to the open-source, server-oriented GNU/Linux distribution and it's based on the recently released 4MLinux Server 23.1 operating system, which means that it runs the Linux 4.9.61 LTS kernel under the hood, along with other updates like OpenSSL 1.0.2m, Postfix 3.2.4, and Stunnel 5.43.

On the server side of things, TheSSS 23.1 updates the MariaDB database server to version 10.2.10, the Apache web server to version 2.4.29, as well as the PHP packages to both 7.0.25 and 5.6.32 releases, the latter being available for compatibility reasons.

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Open source Linux-on-Zynq SBC debuts new FPGA add-on standard

Filed under
Linux
OSS

Opal Kelly’s “SYZYGY Brain-1” SBC, which runs Linux on a Zynq-7012S, is a proof of concept for its SYZYGY standard for FPGA-driven peripherals.

FPGA development firm Opal Kelly has gone to Crowd Supply to launch a development board to showcase its SYZYGY standard for FPGA peripheral expansion. SYZYGY bridges the gap between Digilent’s low-speed Pmod connector and the higher-end VITA 57.1 FMC (FPGA Mezzanine Card) standard. The open source, 110 x 75mm SYZYGY Brain-1 SBC runs Linux on a Xilinx Zynq-7012S SoC, a member of the FPGA-enabled Zynq-7000S family, which offers single Cortex-A9 cores instead of dual dual cores on the Zynq-7000 series.

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Why Linux can make you feel thankful or merely stuffed

Filed under
Linux

There are many reasons why I came to appreciate Unix and then Linux and why they became such an important part of my life. These operating systems provided a focus and a career specialty that I've greatly enjoyed. I appreciate Linus Torvalds and the many thousands of developers who have contributed their time and energy into building a powerful, efficient and enjoyable operating system. I appreciate the many tools and commands that make them so easy to use and get my work done. And I appreciate the chances that I've had to share what I've learned with so many others. It's been fun, and it's been very rewarding.

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Samsung DeX will finally give life to the Linux smartphone

Filed under
GNU
KDE
Linux

Remember when Canonical was doing everything they could to bring convergence between the Linux desktop and the Ubuntu Phone? They worked tirelessly to make it happen, only to fall short of that goal. This effort was preceded by Ubuntu Edge—a smartphone that, by itself, would bridge the mobile device and the desktop. That failed as well, but the intent was the same.

For those that aren't familiar, the idea behind convergence is simple: Offer a single device that could serve as both a smartphone handset, and when connected to a monitor work as a standard desktop computer. The idea is quite brilliant and makes perfect sense. Especially when you remember how many people use a smartphone as their only means of either connecting to the world or productivity. With that number growing every year, the idea of convergence becomes even more important. Give them one device that could function in two very important ways.

Read more

Also: Samsung Galaxy S8 Icon Theme for KDE Plasma

PINE64 PINEBOOK Review — Is This $89 Linux Laptop Worth it?

Filed under
GNU
Linux

A while back, there were articles circulating about the “World’s Cheapest Laptop,” but they really weren’t accurate. The PINEBOOK weighs in at $89USD for the 11″ model and $99USD for the 14″ model. But, can a sub-$100 laptop, new or used, really be worth it? It would almost be unanymously be argued not, but the PINEBOOK makes a very compelling case. Let’s tell you about it in detail.

PINE64, the company behind the first budget/hobbyist 64bit single board computer by the same name, has started offering a lot more in the alternative computing arena. They have a wide variety of inventory on their website containing all sorts of odds and ends in addition to the flagship offerings. Everything a tinkerer might need, from microSD cards to USB wifi, USB ethernet, even power over ethernet broken-out into a DC barrel adapter and LCD panels, all for very appealing prices.

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Also: Surface Book 2 can’t stay charged during gaming sessions

Inspiring the Next Generation of Open Source

Filed under
Linux

The Linux Foundation works through our projects, training and certification programs, events and more to bring people of all backgrounds into open source. We meet a lot of people, but find the drive and enthusiasm of some of our youngest community members to be especially infectious. In the past couple of months, we’ve invited 13-year-old algorithmist and cognitive developer Tanmay Bakshi, 11-year-old hacker and cybersecurity ambassador Reuben Paul, and 15-year-old programmer Keila Banks to speak at Linux Foundation conferences.

In 2014 when he was 12, Zachary Dupont wrote a letter to his hero Linus Torvalds. We arranged for Zach to meet Linus–a visit that helped clinch his love for Linux. This year, Zach came to Open Source Summit in Los Angeles to catch up with Linus and let us know what he’s been up to. He’s kept busy with an internship at SAP and early acceptance to the Computer Networking and Digital Forensics program at the Delaware County Technical School.

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Running Radeon RX Vega On Linux 4.15, NVIDIA/Radeon Benchmarks

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

With AMDGPU DC having been merged a few days ago for the Linux 4.15 merge window, it's now possible to run the Radeon RX Vega graphics cards with display support using the mainline kernel without having to resort to using a patched/third-party kernel build or using the AMDGPU-PRO hybrid driver. Here are some tests I have carried out with the Radeon RX Vega 56, RX Vega 64, and other graphics cards from Linux 4.15 Git compared to a few NVIDIA GPUs.

Read more

Also: NVIDIA's Binary Driver Doesn't Yet Play Nicely With Linux 4.15

Less related: 'Urgent data corruption issue' destroys filesystems in Linux 4.14

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Linux 4.10 To Linux 4.15 Kernel Benchmarks

The ThinkPad X1 Carbon has been enjoying its time on Linux 4.15. In addition to the recent boot time tests and kernel power comparison, here are some raw performance benchmarks looking at the speed from Linux 4.10 through Linux 4.15 Git. With this Broadwell-era Core i7 5600U laptop with 8GB RAM, HD Graphics, and 128GB SATA 3.0 SSD with Ubuntu 17.10 x86_64, the Linux 4.10 through 4.15 Git mainline kernels were benchmarked. Each one was tested "out of the box" and the kernel builds were obtained from the Ubuntu Mainline Kernel archive. Read more