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Linux

Strawberry Released for Sparky Linux, feren OS 2019.04 in Review

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GNU
Linux

Linux Mint KDE Still Possible

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Linux

If you're the Linux Mint and KDE lover, then you know that starting from Linux Mint 19 "Tara", your beloved Linux distro has stopped shipping with KDE. So Linux Mint KDE has died a brutal death. But we can revive the combination of the two best software, i.e. Linux Mint on KDE.

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The Great GNU/Linux Division

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GNU
Linux

I have not abandoned the language of the purists altogether. For instance, I still refer to my distribution of choice as ?Debian GNU/Linux,? because that is what project members prefer. Similarly, if an FSF employee asks that I use their preferred term, I will usually agree if I think the story I?m covering is one in which people should know the difference.

What has changed is my refusal to be overly-concerned about such matters of language. While language issues were worth discussing 20 years ago, the inability to move beyond them is obsessive and crankish today. If the purists really want to help free software, they would be more useful contributing to the project of their choice than clinging a cause that was lost years ago.

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Dropped Linux Kernel Drivers Occasionally See Revival - FDOMAIN Gets Second Chance

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Linux

When drivers get dropped from the Linux kernel it's generally due to hardware being no one cares about anymore that hasn't been produced in many years and the code often falls into disrepair to the point that the only logical way forward is dropping the driver. That happened last year to the "FDOMAIN" driver but as does happen every so often (albeit rare) thanks to the code being still obtainable through Git and the nature of open-source, interested parties can step up and revive the code.

The FDOMAIN Linux driver is for Future Domain 16-bit SCSI host adapters found in a variety of PCI boards. The code was removed in March of 2018 as the Future Domain drivers hadn't seen any bug fixing in years and were relying upon SCSI infrastructure deprecated some fifteen years earlier. The supported PCI SCSI adapters haven't even been produced in many years albeit can still be found from some after-market shops / eBay like the Adaptec AHA-2920A card that allows up to seven SCSI peripherals over PCI.

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The end of Scientific Linux

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Linux

Scientific Linux is driven by Fermilab's scientific mission and focused
on the changing needs of experimental facilities.

Fermilab is looking ahead to DUNE[1] and other future international
collaborations. One part of this is unifying our computing platform with
collaborating labs and institutions.

Toward that end, we will deploy CentOS 8 in our scientific computing
environments rather than develop Scientific Linux 8. We will
collaborate with CERN and other labs to help make CentOS an even better
platform for high-energy physics computing.

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Linux on Dex comes to Galaxy S9, Galaxy S10 and the Galaxy Tab S5e

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Linux

Linux on DeX is aimed to bring the seamless mobility of Samsung’s DeX platform for developers to code on the go. The app enables developers to work on both Android and Ubuntu-based Linux distributions anytime, anywhere. Other Linux distributions may also work, although Samsung isn’t offering official support for those yet. Also, Samsung is partnering with Canonical, the maker of the Ubuntu Linux distribution, to provide Linux on DeX users with a modified version of Ubuntu.

As of now, Linux on DeX is only compatible with the Galaxy Note 9 and the Galaxy Tab S4. However, with the new update, users of Samsung’s Galaxy S flagships from 2018 as well as 2019 get it too. The recently launched Galaxy Tab S5e also now supports Linux on DeX. The new version, which is currently in beta, also fixes the issue with Ubuntu image download on Google Chrome.

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The Linux desktop is not in trouble

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Linux

Writing for ZDNet earlier this month, Steven J. Vaughan-Nichols declared trouble for the Linux desktop. He’s wrong.

Or maybe not. Maybe we’re just looking at different parts of the elephant. sjvn’s core argument, if I may sum it up, is that fragmentation is holding back the Linux desktop. Linux can’t gain significant traction in the desktop market because there are just so many options. This appeals to computer nerds, but leads to confusion for general users who don’t want to care about whether they’re running GNOME or KDE Plasma or whatever.

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Thunderbolt Is Seeing A Lot Of Improvements For Linux 5.2

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Linux

Adding to the excitement of the Linux 5.2 kernel changes are a lot of Thunderbolt improvements expected to be introduced in this next kernel cycle.

Mika Westerberg of Intel has been working on a lot of Thunderbolt connectivity improvements destined for Linux 5.2 and in recent days has begun staging this work in the thunderbolt-next tree ahead of the Linux 5.2 kernel merge window opening in May.

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Video/Audio: Manjaro 18.0 Deepin Edition, Open Source Security Podcast, This Week in Linux, Linux Gaming News Punch, Linux Action News, GNU World Order and Talk Python to Me

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GNU
Linux
  • What’s New in Manjaro 18.0 Deepin Desktop Edition

    Manjaro 18.0 Deepin Edition is official Manjaro Linux flavour with Deepin Desktop Environment 15.8 as default desktop environment includes several deepin applications a free open source software.

    Manjaro 18.0 Deepin Edition is powered by the latest Long-Term Support of Linux Kernel 4.19, include pamac version 7.3. in manjaro 18.0, The Manjaro Settings Manager (MSM) now provides an easy-to-use graphical interface for installing and removing the many series of kernels. At the time of this release, eight kernel-series are available directly from manjaro binary repositories, from 3.16 series to the latest 4.19 release.

  • Open Source Security Podcast: Episode 142 - Hypothetical security: what if you find a USB flash drive?

    Josh and Kurt talk about what one could do if you find a USB drive. The context is based on the story where the Secret Service was rumored to have plugged a malicious USB drive into a computer. The purpose of discussion is to explore how to handle a situation like this in the real world. We end the episode with a fantastic comparison of swim safety and security.

  • Episode 64 | This Week in Linux

    On this episode of This Week in Linux, we got a lot of releases week. Ubuntu and all of the Flavours have released 19.04 versions along with an interesting update from the Ubuntu derivative Pop!_OS. The KDE Community announced the availability of a bunch of new versions of various KDE Applications.

  • Linux Gaming News Punch - Episode 9

    Coming in hot (please save me from this heat) is the ninth episode of the Linux Gaming News Punch, your weekly round-up of some interesting bits of news.

    For regular readers, as always this might not be too helpful but for those who don't visit too often this should help keep you updated.

  • Linux Action News 102

    Ubuntu 19.04 is released we share our take, OpenSSH has an important release, and Mozilla brings Python to the browser.

    Also WebThings is launched and we think it might have a shot.

  • GNU World Order 13x17
  • Talk Python to Me: #208 Packaging, Making the most of PyCon, and more

    Are you going to PyCon (or a similar conference)? Join me and Kenneth Retiz as we discuss how to make the most of PyCon and what makes it special for each of us.

Linux v5.1-rc6

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Linux

It's Easter Sunday here, but I don't let little things like random
major religious holidays interrupt my kernel development workflow. The
occasional scuba trip? Sure. But everybody sitting around eating
traditional foods? No. You have to have priorities. There's only so
much memma you can eat even if your wife had to make it from scratch
because nobody eats that stuff in the US.

Anyway, rc6 is actually larger than I would have liked, which made me
go back and look at history, and for some reason that's not all that
unusual. We recently had similar rc6 bumps in both 4.18 and 5.0.

So I'm not going to worry about it. I think it's just random timing of
pull requests, and almost certainly at least partly due to the
networking pull request in here (with just over a third of the changes
being networking-related, either in drivers or core networking).

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Also: Linux 5.1-rc6 Kernel Released In Linus Torvalds' Easter Day Message

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More in Tux Machines

Ubuntu: 5 Reasons to Upgrade, Sophia Sanles-Luksetich Interview, Ubuntu on Neural Compute Stick and Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter

  • 5 Reasons to Upgrade to Ubuntu 19.04 "Disco Dingo"
    On the surface, new versions of Ubuntu aren’t as big as they used to be. Like in the days before Canonical created its own Unity interface, the Ubuntu experience is now functionally similar to what you get in alternatives such as Fedora and openSUSE. But there are a few big reasons to be eager for what Ubuntu 19.04 “Disco Dingo” has to offer, with some additions demonstrating just how nice it is to have Ubuntu desktop developers spending more time working directly on GNOME.
  • Women and Nonbinary People in Information Security: Sophia Sanles-Luksetich
    Sophia Sanles-Luksetich: I am a rookie information security consultant. I currently perform bug bounty triage for companies which I am not allowed to name, but let’s just say most folks have heard of these companies. Before I got into information security, I was an IT generalist who dabbled in a bit of programming, Linux and privacy. Ubuntu was actually my first OS. It’s funny to think now that my decision as a 12-year-old could have impacted my career so much ten years later. KC: I must admit that it’s unusual that Ubuntu was your first OS. But that’s great! I use Kubuntu on my work desktop. Did that make you delve into Debian a bit? SSL: Oh cool! I have dabbled with Debian a bit, but not as much as most folks would expect. I think I learned a lot more soft skills using Ubuntu at a young age. Like when I couldn’t download my favorite game as a kid, I spent hours reading error logs, documentation and forums to figure out how to get the game working on my computer. Open Source Software (OSS) is also very modular compared to a lot of closed source software, so learning how software is built on other software was a big help. Now everything is miles down a supply chain that most people can barely scratch the surface of, at least in my opinion. [...] KC: Excellent. How did you get into Ubuntu computing initially? SSL: We had a family computer that stopped working. Rather than buy a new Windows disk to fix it, I asked around to my friends. Funny enough, one of my friend’s dad worked in information security, and I played board games with him and his son. I asked his son to give me a copy, and he messed it up by downloading it onto the CD rather than doing an image transfer. Lucky for me, I had a bit more a competent IT friend, Rikki, who ripped me a fresh CD. It’s funny, too; she was a lot more like me then, I thought. We both started in theater and ended up getting into computers just because they are resourceful and we were both people who loved the convenience for record keeping. I think what got me into OSS, to begin with, was the idea that I never had to pay for it. I am a cheapskate. I can think of a good chunk of my IT experience that I learned by trying to get something for free. I learned how to torrent, how to not screw up your computer on harmful sites. Always a fun time! [...] SSL: I think if I could give one piece of advice to new cybersecurity folks, I would tell them all to volunteer at conferences and talk to the attendees. You will learn a lot just by talking to people in the field. Oh, and of course, don’t discount soft skills and the fundamentals.
  • How developers are using Intel’s AI tools to make planet Earth a better place
    Biswas first gathered plant data from Google images, then used TensorFlow (widely-used machine learning framework in the deep learning space) and Open Vino (Intel’s neural network optimisation toolkit) to build an AI model. Once the images and videos of plants were captured the model is used to identify the cause of the disease, possible cures and preventive measures. To run these solutions, Biswas used Intel 7th Gen i5 NUC mini PC. [...] Ma took a digital microscope and connected it to a modestly powerful Ubuntu based laptop with Intel’s Neural Compute Stick connected to it. The entire system cost less than $500. The neural network at the heart of the system was able to successfully determine the shape, colour, density, and edges of the Escherichia coli (E. coli) and the bacteria that causes cholera.
  • Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 575
  • Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 575

Android Leftovers

Kodi 'Leia' 18.2 now available to download with bug fixes and performance improvements

The Kodi Foundation made the release candidate for Kodi 18.2 available last week, and today you can grab the final version. As you’d expect, this is a bug fix release with no major new functionality, but there are a number of notable changes including improvements to the music database performance and a new Codec Factory for Android. Read more

howtos and programming leftovers