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Linux Mint 17.1 “Rebecca” KDE RC released!

Filed under
GNU
Linux

The team is proud to announce the release of Linux Mint 17.1 “Rebecca” KDE RC.

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Get Out the Vote for LinuxQuestions.org

Filed under
GNU
Linux

One great thing about this poll — probably the best thing about this poll — is that each of the categories has an extremely wide range of candidates, and there are programs in many of the categories that I’ve never heard of. Hearing about them for the first time, I get to try them out. So not only is it fun — yeah, I think voting is fun (so shoot me) — it’s also educational.

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SuperX 3.0 Beta Released

Filed under
GNU
KDE
Linux

SuperX, a relatively new distribution, just released beta for its upcoming 3.0 release. SuperX is a KDE centric distribution, and focuses on giving a polished KDE experience (a marketing statement, SuperX guys use).

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6 Ideal Last Minute Linux Xmas Gift Ideas

Filed under
Linux

Christmas, Yule, Winterville, new socks day… Whatever you call it you’ll be panic stricken to hear that it’s almost here. Like the rest of us in denial, you are a little stumped for ideas.

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Qseven i.MX6 COM adds industrial temperature range

Filed under
Android
Linux

Aaeon’s first ARM-based COM — a Qseven-based “AQ7-IMX6″ module running Android or Linux on a Freescale i.MX6 — has added an industrial temperature option.

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Calculate Linux 14.12 released

Filed under
GNU
Linux

We are happy to announce the release of Calculate Linux 14.12.

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Why is the Number of Linux Distros Declining?

Filed under
GNU
Linux

The number of Linux distributions is declining. In 2011, the Distrowatch database of active Linux distributions peaked at 323. Currently, however, it lists only 285. However, exactly why the decline is taking place and how much it matters remains unclear.

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Pay For Faster Linux Kernel Performance? There's Patches For That

Filed under
Linux

The "eXt73" patch-set aspires to yield faster kernel performance and better power efficiency. Independent benchmarks published of the eXt73 patch-set indicate faster performance out of the patched Linux kernel, but these patches do come at a cost for end-users.

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Linux Malware vs Phishing Schemes

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Security

For years now, we’ve been told about the dangers of how various types of malware like worms and other threats were going to catch the growing Linux user base off guard. As of the year 2014, nothing remotely close to this has happened. Malware exists, but for desktop Linux users, it’s a non-issue.

Despite this fact, there continues to be rumors that malware "could" affect desktop Linux users. It seems the mere "threat" holds greater proof of concept than the reality that no one is actually seeing malware threats on their Linux desktop.

In this article, I’ll examine current threats to the Linux desktop and explain why I believe phishing is far more dangerous to most Linux users than malware.

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Low-power COMs run Linux and Android on Cortex-A5 SoC

Filed under
Android
Linux

MYIR introduced a pair of Linux- and Android-ready COMs and baseboards featuring Atmel’s low-power, 536MHz SAMA5D3 SoC, with LCD, GbE, and dual CAN ports.

MYIR’s MCC-SAMA5D3X-C and MYC-SAMA5D3X computer-on-modules both feature Atmel’s Cortex-A5 based SAMA5D3 system-on-chip, but are implemented on two different form factors, and with slightly different mixes of I/O. The soon-to-ship 82 x 55mm MCC-SAMA5D3X-C plugs into a baseboard via pin-headers on its underside, while currently-available 68 x 45mm MYC-SAMA5D3X uses edgecard fingers to slot into a 200-pin SODIMM connector. Both COMs are supported by ready-to-use development baseboards.

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More in Tux Machines

Google and ODF

  • Fuzz about Google supporting odf
    First of all because the support comes way too late. Secondly because its not even close to be good. Back several years ago Google was politically supporting the process of getting odf approved as an open standard but they never really bothered. The business was clearly to keep both odf and ooxml/docx out of their products and keep their own proprietary document format. Implementing good and solid interoperability is actually not difficult but it is a huge task. Google could have done this three or four years ago if they wanted to. But they didn't. Both proprietary software vendors has been busy making interoperability difficult while the providers of true open standards has been improving interoperability month by month.
  • Google Promises Better Compatibility with Open Source Documents
    Google (GOOG) may soon be taking open OpenDocumentFormat (ODF), the native file format in virtually all modern open source word processors, like LibreOffice and OpenOffice, more seriously. That's according to a statement from Google's open source chief speaking about the future of the company's cloud-based app suite.

Microsoft tells J.S. Joust devs their game is “NOT possible” on Windows

PlayStation Move-enabled game only on Mac and Linux for now, will be open sourced. Read more

Fedora 21

Fedora 21 is out and I’ve been able to spend some time with it. The last version of Fedora I looked at was more than two years ago, so there have been quite a few changes since then. The new version of Fedora comes in three basic options: Fedora Cloud, Fedora Server and Fedora Workstation. Read more