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Tizen News

Filed under
Linux
  • Samsung Gear Watch Designer Beta v 1.2.1 Released

    Samsung Gear Watch Designer is a software application used to create watch faces for supported Gear Smartwatch devices such as the Gear S, S2, S3, and Fit2. The app has been updated to version 1.2.1, which is available for both Windows and Mac Operating Systems (OS), but still there is no Linux option for those that prefer our little Tux friend.

  • Smart View SDK update – Offers New version of DMP and Wireless speaker support

    The new version of Smart view SDK has just rollout. This update has an updated version of the Default Media Player (DMP), which allows new support for music, photo contents and playlists. Now, Samsung wireless speakers will also be a part of Samsung’s smart view enabled devices.

    With this update developers can easily implement casting features and get much easier control over playlist control. Users will now be able to enjoy casting a variety types of content with simple controls. The casting features are basically two different types, App casting and Media casting. App casting will allow you to discover and launch TV applications on a compatible Samsung Smart TV by the use of a smartphone using the relevant APIs, and Media casting will allow you to Send photos to the TV, Play and control videos as well as music.

  • Spreadtrum Acknowledges SC9830i LTE SOC adopted in Samsung Z2

    The System On a Chip (SOC) that Samsung had used in the Z2 Tizen smartphone was a tight secret despite most of the details of the phone was leaked prior to its launch. Rumors were also spread that the device could possibly employ one of its own Exynos SOC. However, post the launch of the device it was found that Samsung had continued with a Spreadtrum SOC. The Z2 has the Spreadtrum SC9830i SOC and although the world already knows this fact, Spreadtrum Communications recently took some time to talk about it at an event in Shanghai, China.

  • Samsung Gear Watch Designer Beta v 1.2.1 Released

    Samsung Gear Watch Designer is a software application used to create watch faces for supported Gear Smartwatch devices such as the Gear S, S2, S3, and Fit2. The app has been updated to version 1.2.1, which is available for both Windows and Mac Operating Systems (OS), but still there is no Linux option for those that prefer our little Tux friend.

  • Smart View SDK update – Offers New version of DMP and Wireless speaker support

    The new version of Smart view SDK has just rollout. This update has an updated version of the Default Media Player (DMP), which allows new support for music, photo contents and playlists. Now, Samsung wireless speakers will also be a part of Samsung’s smart view enabled devices.

    With this update developers can easily implement casting features and get much easier control over playlist control. Users will now be able to enjoy casting a variety types of content with simple controls. The casting features are basically two different types, App casting and Media casting. App casting will allow you to discover and launch TV applications on a compatible Samsung Smart TV by the use of a smartphone using the relevant APIs, and Media casting will allow you to Send photos to the TV, Play and control videos as well as music.

  • Spreadtrum Acknowledges SC9830i LTE SOC adopted in Samsung Z2

    The System On a Chip (SOC) that Samsung had used in the Z2 Tizen smartphone was a tight secret despite most of the details of the phone was leaked prior to its launch. Rumors were also spread that the device could possibly employ one of its own Exynos SOC. However, post the launch of the device it was found that Samsung had continued with a Spreadtrum SOC. The Z2 has the Spreadtrum SC9830i SOC and although the world already knows this fact, Spreadtrum Communications recently took some time to talk about it at an event in Shanghai, China.

How to Effectively and Efficiently Edit Configuration Files in Linux

Filed under
Linux
HowTos

Every Linux administrator has to eventually (and manually) edit a configuration file. Whether you are setting up a web server, configuring a service to connect to a database, tweaking a bash script, or troubleshooting a network connection, you cannot avoid a dive deep into the heart of one or more configuration files. To some, the prospect of manually editing configuration files is akin to a nightmare. Wading through what seems like countless lines of options and comments can put you on the fast track for hair and sanity loss.

Which, of course, isn’t true. In fact, most Linux administrators enjoy a good debugging or configuration challenge. Sifting through the minutiae of how a server or software functions is a great way to pass time. But this process doesn’t have to be an exercise in ineffective inefficiency. In fact, tools are available to you that go a very long way to make the editing of config files much, much easier. I’m going to introduce you to a few such tools, to ease some of the burden of your Linux admin duties. I’ll first discuss the command-line tools that are invaluable to the task of making configuration more efficient.

Read more

Why Good Linux Sysadmins Use Markdown

Filed under
Linux

The Markdown markup language is perfect for writing system administrator documentation: it is lightweight, versatile, and easy to learn, so you spend your time writing instead of fighting with formatting.

The life of a Linux system administrator is complex and varied, and you know that documenting your work is a big time-saver. A documentation web server shared by you and your colleagues is a wonderful productivity tool. Most of us know simple HTML, and can whack up a web page as easily as writing plain text. But using Markdown is better.

Read more

Purism’s next product could be a smartphone that runs Linux/free software

Filed under
Linux
OSS

Purism is a company that’s been developing laptops and tablets that run Linux-based, free and open source software for a few years.

Now Purism is considering building a smartphone and the company is soliciting feedback from potential customers.

The idea would be to release a Librem Phone that runs GNU/Linux rather than Android, and which offers security and privacy features to help set it apart from most other phones on the market.

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Cinnamon 3.2 in Linux Mint 18.1 Supports Vertical Panels, Better Accelerometers

Filed under
Linux

After informing the community a few days ago about the Mintbox Mini Pro PC and the upcoming improvements and new features shipping with the XApps software projects in Linux Mint 18.1, Clement Lefebvre just published the monthly Linux Mint newsletter.

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Licensing resource series: Free GNU/Linux distributions & GNU Bucks

Filed under
GNU
Linux

When Richard Stallman set out to create the GNU Project, the goal was to create a fully free operating system. Over 33 years later, it is now possible for users to have a computer that runs only free software. But even if all the software is available, putting it all together yourself, or finding a distribution that comes with only free software, would be quite the task. That is why we provide a list of Free GNU/Linux distributions.

Each distro on the list is commited to only distributing free software. With many to choose from, you can find a distro that meets your needs while respecting your freedom.

But with so much software making up an entire operating system, how is it possible to make sure that nothing nasty sneaks into the distro? That's where you, and GNU Bucks come in.

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Linux 4.7.6

Filed under
Linux

I'm announcing the release of the 4.7.6 kernel.

All users of the 4.7 kernel series must upgrade.

The updated 4.7.y git tree can be found at:
git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-stable.git linux-4.7.y
and can be browsed at the normal kernel.org git web browser:
http://git.kernel.org/?p=linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-st...

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Also: Linux 4.4.23

Linaro beams LITE at Internet of Things devices

Filed under
Linux
OSS

Linaro launched a “Linaro IoT and Embedded” (LITE) group, to develop end-to-end open source reference software for IoT devices and applications.

Linaro, which is owned by ARM and major ARM licensees, and which develops open source software for ARM devices, launched a Linaro IoT and Embedded (LITE) Segment Group at this week’s Linaro Connect event in Las Vegas. The objective of the LITE initiative is to produce “end to end open source reference software for more secure connected products, ranging from sensors and connected controllers to smart devices and gateways, for the industrial and consumer markets,” says Linaro.

Read more

Also:

  • Linaro organisation, with ARM, aims for end-end open source IoT code

    With the objective of producing reference software for more secure connected products, ranging from sensors and connected controllers to smart devices and gateways, for the industrial and consumer markets, Linaro has announced LITE: Collaborative Software Engineering for the Internet of Things (IoT).

    Linaro and the LITE members will work to reduce fragmentation in operating systems, middleware and cloud connectivity solutions, and will deliver open source device reference platforms to enable faster time to market, improved security and lower maintenance costs for connected products. Industry interoperability of diverse, connected and secure IoT devices is a critical need to deliver on the promise of the IoT market, the organisation says. “Today, product vendors are faced with a proliferation of choices for IoT device operating systems, security infrastructure, identification, communication, device management and cloud interfaces.”

  • An open source approach to securing The Internet of Things
  • Addressing the IoT Security Problem

    Last week's DDOS takedown of security guru Brian Krebs' website made history on several levels. For one, it was the largest such reported attack ever, with unwanted traffic to the site hitting levels of 620 Gbps, more than double the previous record set back in 2013, and signalling that the terabyte threshold will certainly be crossed soon. It also relied primarily on compromised Internet of Things devices.

LXLE: A Linux distro to give new life to old hardware

Filed under
GNU
Linux

I’ll bet that somewhere, perhaps at home and most likely at work, you’ve got some old hardware lying around. What to do with it? It still works but what’s it running? Windows XP? Vista? Windows 7 Starter or Home Basic?

Yep, you’re stuck on some old version of Windows but moving that machine up to a newer version of Windows could be tricky ‘cause one or more of those old graphics cards and printer drivers have probably have fallen out of the update cycle.

Even if those subsystems are still available, you’ll still have a problem as the newer OSs' are pretty much guaranteed to suck the life out of old processors with the result that performance and therefore usability will be marginal at best.

So, what to do? Before you start looking for a deal on a new machine and an e-waste disposal site, consider moving to Linux and, most specifically, consider migrating to LXLE, the LXDE eXtra Luxury Edition (though some people also claim it stands for Lubuntu Extra Life Extension).

Read more

Linux Graphics: Mesa and Gallium3D

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
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ownCloud Desktop Client 2.2.4 Released with Updated Dolphin Plugin, Bug Fixes

ownCloud is still alive and kicking, and they've recently released a new maintenance update of the ownCloud Desktop Client, version 2.2.4, bringing some much-needed improvements and patching various annoying issues. Read more

Early Benchmarks Of The Linux 4.9 DRM-Next Radeon/AMDGPU Drivers

While Linux 4.9 will not officially open for development until next week, the DRM-Next code is ready to roll with all major feature work having been committed by the different open-source Direct Rendering Manager drivers. In this article is some preliminary testing of this DRM-Next code as of 29 September when testing various AMD GPUs with the Radeon and AMDGPU DRM drivers. Linux 4.9 does bring compile-time-offered experimental support for the AMD Southern Islands GCN 1.0 hardware on AMDGPU, but that isn't the focus of this article. A follow-up comparison is being done with GCN 1.0/1.1 experimental support enabled to see the Radeon vs. AMDGPU performance difference on that hardware. For today's testing was a Radeon R7 370 to look at the Radeon DRM performance and for AMDGPU testing was the Radeon R9 285, R9 Fury, and RX 480. Benchmarks were done from the Linux 4.8 Git and Linux DRM-Next kernels as of 29 September. Read more

How to Effectively and Efficiently Edit Configuration Files in Linux

Every Linux administrator has to eventually (and manually) edit a configuration file. Whether you are setting up a web server, configuring a service to connect to a database, tweaking a bash script, or troubleshooting a network connection, you cannot avoid a dive deep into the heart of one or more configuration files. To some, the prospect of manually editing configuration files is akin to a nightmare. Wading through what seems like countless lines of options and comments can put you on the fast track for hair and sanity loss. Which, of course, isn’t true. In fact, most Linux administrators enjoy a good debugging or configuration challenge. Sifting through the minutiae of how a server or software functions is a great way to pass time. But this process doesn’t have to be an exercise in ineffective inefficiency. In fact, tools are available to you that go a very long way to make the editing of config files much, much easier. I’m going to introduce you to a few such tools, to ease some of the burden of your Linux admin duties. I’ll first discuss the command-line tools that are invaluable to the task of making configuration more efficient. Read more

Why Good Linux Sysadmins Use Markdown

The Markdown markup language is perfect for writing system administrator documentation: it is lightweight, versatile, and easy to learn, so you spend your time writing instead of fighting with formatting. The life of a Linux system administrator is complex and varied, and you know that documenting your work is a big time-saver. A documentation web server shared by you and your colleagues is a wonderful productivity tool. Most of us know simple HTML, and can whack up a web page as easily as writing plain text. But using Markdown is better. Read more