Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Linux

RK3399 based Qseven module has extended temp support

Filed under
Android
Linux

Arbor’s “EmQ-RK390” Qseven module runs Linux or Android on a Rockchip RK3399 with up to 4GB of soldered RAM and 16GB soldered eMMC, plus PCIe and GbE support and an extended temperature range.

In January, Arbor Technology announced that it would show a Rockchip RK3399 “EmQ-RK390” Qseven 2.1 module at the Embedded World show in late February. We never saw a follow-up announcement or product page, but a datasheet has been posted. The module runs Ubuntu, Buildroot, or Android 8.1 on the hexa-core RK3399.

Earlier Arbor Qseven modules have included the Intel Apollo Lake based EmQ-i2401. We’ve seen only a handful of RK3399-based COMs of any kind. One of them is Theobroma’s Qseven form-factor RK3399-Q7.

Read more

4MLinux 29.0 BETA released.

Filed under
GNU
Linux

4MLinux 29.0 BETA is ready for testing. Basically, at this stage of development, 4MLinux BETA has the same features as 4MLinux STABLE, but it provides a huge number of updated packages.

Read more

Kernel: FBDEVDRM, QNINE NVMe SSD Tested and GRUB2 EFI Support In Fedora 31

Filed under
Linux
  • SUSE Develops New Driver That Exposes DRM Atop FBDEV Frame-Buffer Drivers

    SUSE developer Thomas Zimmermann has posted his work on "FBDEVDRM" as a new Direct Rendering Manager driver for exposing the DRM interfaces on top of legacy "FBDEV" frame-buffer drivers. For old frame-buffer drivers not ported to modern DRM/KMS interfaces, this could open up some interesting possibilities and at least allow these vintage display drivers to work with the likes of Plymouth and other programs only supporting the DRM interfaces.

  • Linux Tests Of The QNINE M.2 NVMe SSD Enclosure To USB-C Adapter

    The QNINE NVMe SSD enclosure is an M.2 NVMe to USB-C/USB-3.1 adapter that retails for about $40 USD from the likes of Amazon. Only Windows and macOS support is mentioned, but the drive was detected just fine and working under Linux. This QNINE adapter is just one of many M.2 NVMe to USB-C adapters on the market and most in the $40~60 USD price range.

  • GRUB2 EFI Support In Fedora 31 Likely To Include New Security Modules

    Another change being sought for Fedora 31 is including some newer GRUB2 modules as part of the distribution's GRUB EFI boot-loader build to provide some additional security functionality. 

    Peter Jones and Javier Martinez Canillas, both of Red Hat, are looking to have Fedora 31's GRUB2 EFI package include the verify, cryptodisk, and LUKS modules. This inclusion is being pursued since those using UEFI SecureBoot cannot manually insert modules not already in the grubx64.efi and thus losing out on these possible options for improving the integrity of the early-launch code.

How to use NetBSD on a Raspberry Pi

Filed under
Linux
HowTos

Do you have an old Raspberry Pi lying around gathering dust, maybe after a recent Pi upgrade? Are you curious about BSD Unix? If you answered "yes" to both of these questions, you'll be pleased to know that the first is the solution to the second, because you can run NetBSD, as far back as the very first release, on a Raspberry Pi.

BSD is the Berkley Software Distribution of Unix. In fact, it's the only open source Unix with direct lineage back to the original source code written by Dennis Ritchie and Ken Thompson at Bell Labs. Other modern versions are either proprietary (such as AIX and Solaris) or clever re-implementations (such as Minix and GNU/Linux). If you're used to Linux, you'll feel mostly right at home with BSD, but there are plenty of new commands and conventions to discover. If you're still relatively new to open source, trying BSD is a good way to experience a traditional Unix.

Read more

Intel and Linux: Hardware and Graphics Drivers

Filed under
Linux
  • Toughened up Apollo Lake box PC runs Linux

    The eBOX625-312-FL runs Linux or Windows 10 IoT on Intel’s dual-core, 1.1GHz/2.4GHz Celeron N3350 or quad-core, up to 2.5GHz Pentium N4200. You can load up to 8GB of DDR3L-1866 RAM via a single slot.

  • Intel's Iris Gallium3D Driver Working On Better GPU Recovery Handling

    While Intel's Iris Gallium3D driver is not enabled by default and considered still experimental in its support of Broadwell graphics and newer, in all of our tests thus far it's been working out very well and haven't encountered any hangs so far in our tested OpenGL workloads. But with no OpenGL driver being immune from potential GPU hangs, a patch series is pending to improve the GPU recovery heuristics. 

    Longtime open-source Intel Linux graphics developer Chris Wilson sent out a set of three patches this morning for handling of GPU recovery within the Iris driver. In particular, to opt-out of the Linux kernel's automatic GPU recovery and replay. That approach doesn't work out well for Iris where its batches are constructed incrementally and thus the replay following a reset would likely cause issues due to missing state. With this patch series, the Iris driver will instead re-construct a fresh context for the next batch when the kernel indicates a GPU hang.

  • Intel Icelake Graphics Driver No Longer Considered Alpha Quality, Cometlake Ready Too

    It's just one week past the end of the Linux 5.1 merge window and the Intel open-source developers have already sent out their first pull request to DRM-Next of new graphics driver material they are planning for the Linux 5.2 release this summer.

Google Releases Chrome OS 73 with Support for Sharing Files with Linux Apps

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Google

Google has promoted today the Chrome OS 73 operating system to the stable channel for Chromebook devices, a release that adds several new features, improvements, bug fixes, and security updates.
Coming hot on the heels of the Chrome 73 web browser, which Google released last week for desktops, including GNU/Linux, macOS, and Windows systems, as well as Android mobile devices, the Chrome OS 73 operating system is here to add a number of enhancements to further enrich your Chromebook experience.

New features include support for sharing files and folders with Linux apps, improved native Google Drive integration in the Files app thanks to the addition of support for the Drive > Computers root, better out-of-memory management, native media controls for the video player, and audio focus support on CrOS.

Read more

LOCKDOWN Aiming To Be In Linux 5.2 For Tightening Up Hardware/Kernel Access

Filed under
Linux
Google
Security

Google developer Matthew Garrett recently took over work on the long-standing "LOCKDOWN" kernel patches with a goal of preventing the running kernel image from being modified and strengthen the boundary between UID 0 and the kernel. These patches, which have been around for years and shipped by some Linux distributions, didn't make it into the recent Linux 5.1 merge window but now a pull request has been issued in trying to ship it with Linux 5.2.

Read more

World’s first Zynq UltraScale+ based SMARC module runs Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware

MSC’s rugged “MSC SM2S-ZUSP” SMARC module features a Zynq UltraScale+ MPSoC with 4x Cortex-A53, 2x Cortex-R5, GPU, and FPGA plus up to 8GB DDR4 and 64GB eMMC and optional WiFi/BT and carrier.

MSC Technologies — a brand of Avnet Integrated Solutions — has launched the world’s first SMARC 2.0 form-factor module with Xilinx’s Zynq UltraScale+ MPSoC. The 82 x 50mm SMARC “Short” style MSC SM2S-ZUSP joins other Zynq UltraScale+ based modules such as iWave’s iW-RainboW-G30M, Enclustra‘s Mars XU3 and Mercury+ XU1, Trenz’s TE0808 UltraSOM+, and Iveia’s Atlas-II-Z8 and Atlas-III-Z8 COMs. SBCs include Avnet’s 96Boards compatible Ultra96.

Read more

Puppy Linux 8.0 Released

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Puppy Linux is one of the tiniest Linux distros. It loads into RAM and runs from it making it faster than most Linux distributions. Puppy Linux 8.0 "Bionicpup" came out yesterday with a couple of new features and latest software.
As the codename 'Bionicpup" suggests, this release is based on Ubuntu 18.04.

Read more

Meanwhile in Sparky Linux (lightweight):

  • Sway

    There is a new, small desktop available for Sparkers: Sway

    [...]

    If you don’t want to install gdm3 (and gnome-shell), you can use other display managers, such as LightDM, SDDM, etc., but they can run Sway in Xorg session with Xwayland (xwayland package has to be installed).

The 6 Best Linux Bandwidth Monitoring Tools in 2019

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Knowledge is power! Consequently, knowing what the bandwidth utilization of the network you manage will give you power by allowing you to be proactive and by ensuring that network congestion is avoided as much as possible. To accomplish that, what you need are bandwidth monitoring tools. And since Linux is a popular platform with many network administrators, let’s have a look at some of the best Linux bandwidth monitoring tools available. Considering that most of them are free and open source, they will allow you to start monitoring bandwidth at no other cost than the time you’ll spend installing and configuring them. As you’ll soon find out, many of these tools are as good as some of the best Windows tools.

We’ll begin our exploration by having an overview of bandwidth monitoring. We’ll explain what it is and, more importantly, how it works. This will lead us to discuss the Simple Network Management Protocol, the basis of most monitoring tools. Then, we’ll briefly discuss Linux in general and also what it means to use it as a platform for monitoring tools. Once we’re all on the same page, we’ll be ready for the core of our subject, the best Linux bandwidth monitoring tools.

Read more

Syndicate content