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5 XFCE Terminal Themes You Should Try

Filed under
GNU
Linux

If you spend a lot of time in the terminal, you might as well spruce it up. Yes, there is the standard light gray on black option or even the green on black option. What if you’re looking for something more?

There are numerous ways to spruce up the XFCE terminal. You can even choose each individual color yourself if you prefer. For those who’d rather spend less time on tweaking the terminal and more time getting actual work done, we’ve collected five great XFCE terminal themes to check out.

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10 Reasons To Change Windows For Linux In 2019

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft

Probably many have already heard about the growing opposition of these two operating systems. The most popular Windows is gradually losing ground in the face of free software — GNU / Linux. Is this justified? Of course, I am not talking about the redistribution of the OS market, but the percentage of Linux users is growing steadily, which is only worth thousands of distributions that have appeared over these three decades. In general, today I decided to look at the situation from a certain angle, and present you ten reasons to change Windows to Linux in 2019.

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ExTiX 19.4 "The Ultimate Linux System" is Based on Deepin 15.9.3 and Linux 5.0

Filed under
Linux

The biggest news about the ExTiX Deepin 19.4 release is that it's the first GNU/Linux distribution to be based on the upcoming Deepin Linux 15.9.3 release, which is currently in beta stages of development and has not yet been officially released by Deepin Technology.

Additionally, ExTiX Deepin 19.4 comes with the Linux 5.0.8 kernel for the best possible hardware support, making ExTiX worthy for its "The Ultimate Linux System" nickname. Latest Refracta Snapshot is included as well by default for those who want to make their own ExTiX Deepin 19.4 live systems, along with Spotify and Skype apps.

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Why Linux stands out amongst other OSes

Filed under
OS
Linux

Up until recently, Elementary OS was my platform of choice. It's an elegant, simple, and user-friendly solution for the desktop. One thing that the Elementary developers do that I believe is fairly wise is to not allow upgrades from one major release to another. In other words, if you use Elementary OS Loki, you can't upgrade to Juno. To get the benefits of Juno, you must do a full-blown re-install of the OS.

Why is this route wise? My latest adventures in Linux will help explain.

A few months ago, I purchased a System76 Thelio. It's a beast of a desktop, while at the same a masterful work of art. Preinstalled on that desktop machine was System76's own Pop!_OS. Based on Ubuntu, it seemed like a great way for me to dive back into the GNOME desktop. So I did. It took no time to get accustomed to the new workflow with GNOME. Once my fingers understood the new keyboard shortcuts, I was good to go.

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Linux 5.1 Encounters "Regression Special" For Intel & VirtIO DRM Drivers

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

If you have been hit by a bug on Linux 5.1 where your X.Org Server would no longer start or separately where when using VirtIO DRM that XWayland and GNOME Shell would break, fixes have now landed in Linux 5.1 Git.

David Airlie sent in the DRM fixes on Wednesday as a "regression special" for the Intel i915 and VirtIO DRM drivers compared to the usual DRM fixes cadence.

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How to enable SSH access using a GPG key for authentication

Filed under
Linux
Security
HowTos

Many of us are familiar with Secure Shell (SSH), which allows us to connect to other systems using a key instead of a password. This guide will explain how to eliminate SSH keys and use a GNU Privacy Guard (GPG) subkey instead.

Using GPG does not make your SSH connections more secure. SSH is a secure protocol, and SSH keys are secure. Instead, it makes certain forms of key distribution and backup management easier. It also will not change your workflow for using SSH. All commands will continue to work as you expect, except that you will no longer have SSH private keys and you will unlock your GPG key instead.

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Devices: Airtop3 With Linux Mint and Debian's Jonathan McDowell Studies a PCB

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • Airtop3 Manages A Passively-Cooled Core i9 9900K + Quadro RTX 4000

    CompuLab today announced the Airtop3, the latest in their series of industrial-grade, excellently built fanless PCs. The CompuLab Airtop we benchmarked back in 2016 while showing its age now with the Core i7 5775C Broadwell processor is still running strong with its original design and even after what's been hundreds if not thousands of hours of benchmarking workloads still is running strong. Then again, that isn't too surprising as we continue to be improved by their build quality now after benchmarking their systems with Linux for the past decade.

  • Fanless mini-tower runs Linux Mint on up to 5GHz octa-core i9-9900K

    Compulab’s passively cooled, Linux-friendly “Airtop3” mini-tower builds on a 9th Gen, octa-core Intel Core i9-9900K with Quadro RTX 4000 graphics plus up to 128GB DDR4, NVMe and SATA storage, triple displays, 2x GbE, 6x USB 3.1, and -40 to 70°C support.

    Compulab has launched a redesigned Airtop IoT edge server that accomplishes the challenging task of passively cooling Intel’s high-end, 9th Gen Core i9-9900K processor. The Airtop3 is “nearly” twice as powerful as the 7th Gen Kaby Lake based Airtop2 mini-tower while maintaining the fanless, embedded-oriented design, says Compulab. Linux Mint and Windows 10 Pro are available.

  • Jonathan McDowell: Making my first PCB

    I then started to notice I was getting JLCPCB ads while web browsing, offering 10 PCBs for $2. That seemed like a good deal, and I thought if I did things right I could find the right case and then make sure the PCB fitted in it. I found a small vented white case available from CPC. This allows me to put a temperature sensor inside for some devices. KiCad seemed like a good option for trying to design my basic schematic and lay it out, so I installed it and set to work trying to figure out what I wanted to put on the board, and how to actually drive KiCad.

    As the core I chose an ESP-07 ESP8266 module. I’ve used a few of them before and they’re cheap and convenient. I added an LDO voltage regulator (LD1117) so I could use a 5V PSU (and I’m hoping with a heatsink I can get away with a 12V supply as well, even if it’s more inefficient). That gave enough to get a basic schematic once I’d added the necessary pull-up/down resistors for the ESP8266 and decoupling capacitors. I included a DC barrel jack for the PSU, and pin headers for the serial port, SPI pins and GPIO0 for boot selection. One of my use cases is to make an LED strip controller, so I threw in a screw terminal block for power + control - the board is laid out to allow a MOSFET for a simple white 12V LED strip, or the same GPIO taken straight to the terminal block for controlling a WS2812 strip. By including a couple of extra pull-up resistors I added the option of I2C for further expansion.

    After I had the basic schematic I moved to layout. Luckily Hammond provide 2D CAD files for the case, so I figured I would import them into KiCad’s PCB layout tool to make sure things would fit. That took a little bit of effort to go from DWG to DXF and trim it down (I found a web tool to do the initial conversion and then had to strip out the bits of the case that weren’t related to the PCB size + mounting points). I wasn’t confident enough that the edge cuts layer would include the mounting holes, so I manually placed some from KiCad over the right spots.

5 of the Best Linux Desktops for Touchscreen Monitors in 2019

Filed under
GNU
Linux

The concept of using Linux on a touchscreen monitor or two-in-one computer has come a long way. Touchscreen support is now built into the Linux kernel, so theoretically any Linux distribution should run with a touchscreen. That said, not every distribution will be easy to use on a touchscreen, and this comes down to the desktop.

For example, using a tiling window manager like Awesome or i3 isn’t going to do you much good on a touchscreen. Choose the right desktop (more precisely, desktop environment), and you’ll have a much better time using Linux with a touchscreen.

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ps_mem Shows Per-Program Memory Usage On Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Unlike many other tools that report memory usage per process, ps_mem reports the RAM usage of programs. For example it shows how much RAM is used by all Chromium processes combined. The program developer notes that the ps_mem name is used for backwards compatibility, but a more accurate name would be coremem.

The displayed RAM is calculated by adding the sum of private RAM and the sum of shared RAM for a program processes.

Running ps_mem with no arguments shows a list programs and their RAM usage in ascendant order (from the lowest RAM usage to the highest). For each program it shows the private, shared, and total used RAM, as well as the number of processes. Swap information for each program can be shown as well, by using the -S option (sudo ps_mem -S).

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Strawberry Released for Sparky Linux, feren OS 2019.04 in Review

Filed under
GNU
Linux
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