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How to Run Android Apps and Games on Linux

Filed under
Android
GNU
Linux

Want to run Android apps on Linux? How about play Android games? Several options are available, but the one that works the best is Anbox, a useful tool that runs your favorite Android apps on Linux without emulation.

Here’s how to get it up and running on your Linux PC today.

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Also: 8 Best Android Apps For Kids To Help Children Learn With Fun | 2018 Edition

Record Terminal Activity For Ubuntu 16.04 LTS Server

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Linux

At times system administrators and developers need to use many, complex and lengthy commands in order to perform a critical task. Most of the users will copy those commands and output generated by those respective commands in a text file for review or future reference. Of course, “history” feature of the shell will help you in getting the list of commands used in the past but it won’t help in getting the output generated for those commands.

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Linux Kernel Maintainer Statistics

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Linux

As part of preparing my last two talks at LCA on the kernel community, “Burning Down the Castle” and “Maintainers Don’t Scale”, I have looked into how the Kernel’s maintainer structure can be measured. One very interesting approach is looking at the pull request flows, for example done in the LWN article “How 4.4’s patches got to the mainline”. Note that in the linux kernel process, pull requests are only used to submit development from entire subsystems, not individual contributions. What I’m trying to work out here isn’t so much the overall patch flow, but focusing on how maintainers work, and how that’s different in different subsystems.

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Kernel and Graphics: BUS1, Linux 4.17 RC2, Wayland's Weston and Mesa

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • BUS1 Still Remains Out Of The Mainline Linux Kernel, But DBus-Broker Continues

    The BUS1 in-kernel IPC mechanism born out of the ashes of KDBUS still hasn't been mainlined in the Linux kernel, but its code is still improved upon from time to time. At least though DBus-Broker as a new performance-oriented D-Bus implementation continues gaining ground in user-space.

    DBus-Broker was announced last year as a new message bus implementation of D-Bus focused on high performance and reliability while continuing to offer compatibility with the original D-Bus implementation.

  • Linux 4.17-rc2 Kernel Released With Mostly Routine Changes

    Linus Torvalds has announced the availability of the second weekly test release for what is becoming the Linux 4.17 kernel.

  • Wayland's Weston Gets Optimizations For Its Pixman Renderer

    Wayland's Weston reference compositor with its Pixman software-based renderer back-end has received a number of performance optimizations.

    Fabien Lahoudere of Collabora posted a set of patches today to optimize the Pixman renderer for Weston. In particular, there are optimizations around compositing damage to the screen as well as optimizing the shadow buffer usage. The Weston Pixman renderer is often used as a software accelerated fallback in cases where no GPU hardware acceleration may be available. As implied by the name, it uses the long-standing Pixman library that is also used by Cairo, the X.Org Server, etc, for pixel manipulation on the CPU.

  • Panfrost Gallium3D Driver For ARM Mali Can Now Render A Cube

    The Panfrost open-source driver project previously known as "Chai" for creating an open-source 3D driver stack for ARM's Mali Midgard hardware now has a working shaded cube being rendered using the open-source code as part of its new "half-way" driver based on Gallium3D.

New Terminal App in Chome OS Hints at Upcoming Support for Linux Applications

Filed under
OS
Linux

According to a Reddit thread, a Chromebook user recently spotted a new Terminal app added to the app drawer when running on the latest Chrome OS Dev channel. Clicking the icon would apparently prompt the user to install the Terminal app, which requires about 200 MB of disk space.

The installation prompt notes the fact that the Terminal app can be used to develop on your Chromebook. It also suggests that users will be able to run native apps and command-line tools seamlessly and securely. Considering the fact that Chrome OS is powered by the Linux kernel, this can only mean one thing.

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Raspberry Pi DAC HAT has dual Burr Brown DACs and a 128dB SNR

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Linux

Orchard Audio’s “ApplePi DAC” audio HAT add-on for the Raspberry Pi is available for $175 on Kickstarter, featuring two Burr Brown PCM1794A monoaural DACs, a 128dB SNR, and both balanced and unbalanced outputs.

Orchard Audio quickly surpassed its $5K Kickstarter goal for its ApplePi DAC HAT board, which it is promoting as “the most advanced and highest performance sound card hat for the Raspberry Pi.” It didn’t hurt that Orchard posted a couple of favorable reviews, including one from Volumio co-founder Michelangelo, who wrote: “This DAC is producing the most detailed sound to ever come out of my Raspberry Pi.”

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Security Stunts From Microsoft and Crash Reporting

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft

Linux 4.17-rc2

Filed under
Linux

So rc2 is out, and things look fairly normal.

The diff looks a bit unusual, with the tools subdirectory dominating,
with 30%+ of the whole diff. Mostly perf and test scripts.

But if you ignore that, the rest looks fairly usual. Arch updates
(s390 and x86 dominate) and drivers (networking, gpu, HID, mmc, misc)
are the bulk of it, with misc other changes all over (filesystems,
core kernel, networking, docs).

We've still got some known fallout from the merge window, but it
shouldn't affect most normal configurations, so go out and test.

Linus

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Also: Upstream Linux support for new NXP i.MX8

Terminal app appears in Chome OS Dev, hints at future Linux application support

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Back in February, some commits to the Chromium codebase revealed that Chrome OS would soon run Linux applications using a container. While it has been possible for years to run Linux applications on top of Chrome OS using crouton, it's a hacky solution that only works in Developer Mode. Google's solution would presumably work better, and perhaps not require Dev Mode to be enabled.

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​What's the most popular Linux of them all?

Filed under
Android
GNU
Linux

Let's cut to the chase. Android is the most popular of all Linux distributions. Period. End of statement. But that's not the entire story.

Still it must be said, according to StatCounter, Android is the most popular of all operating systems. By a score of 39.49 percent to 36.63 percent, Android beats out Windows for global personal device supremacy. Sorry Windows, you had a nice run, but between your smartphone failures and the PC decline, your day is done.

But, setting Android aside, what's the most popular Linux? It's impossible to work that out. The website-based analysis tools, such as those used by StatCounter, NetMarketShare, and the Federal government's Digital Analytics Program (DAP), can't tell the difference between Fedora, openSUSE, and Ubuntu.

DAP does give one insightful measurement the others sites don't give us. While not nearly as popular as Android, Chrome OS is more popular than all the other Linux-based desktops combined by a score, in April 2018, of 1.3 percent to 0.6 percent of end users.

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