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This Week in Linux, Chrome OS, and Death of Windows 10 Mobile

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OS
Linux
Microsoft
  • Episode 51 | This Week in Linux

    On this episode of This Week in Linux, we got some new announcements from Inkscape, Purism, Solus, Mozilla, and Steam. We’ll also check out some new Distro releases from Netrunner, Deeping, Android X86 and more. Then we’ll look at some new hardware offerings from Purism and Entroware. Later in the show will talk about some drama happening with a project’s licensing issues and then we’ll round out the episode with some Linux Gaming news including some sales from Humble Bundle. All that and much more!

  • Chrome OS 73 Dev Channel adds Google Drive, Play Files mount in Linux, USB device management and Crostini backup flag

    On Tuesday, Google released the first iteration of Chrome OS 73 for the Dev Channel and there are quite a few new items related to Project Crostini, for Linux app support. Some things in the lengthy changelog only set up new features coming soon while others add new functionality. Here’s a rundown on some of the Crostini additions to Chrome OS 73.

  • Tens to be disappointed as Windows 10 Mobile death date set: Doomed phone OS won't see 2020

    Microsoft has formally set the end date for support of its all-but-forgotten Windows 10 Mobile platform.

    The Redmond code factory said today that, come December 10, it's curtains for the ill-fated smartphone venture. The retirement will end a four-year run for a Microsoft phone effort that never really got off the ground and helped destroy Nokia in the process.

    "The end of support date applies to all Windows 10 Mobile products, including Windows 10 Mobile and Windows 10 Mobile Enterprise," Microsoft declared.

Linux 5.0-rc3 Kernel Released With Plenty Of Fixes Plus Nouveau RTX 2080 Ti Support

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Linux

Linus Torvalds has released the third weekly release candidate for the upcoming Linux 5.0 kernel release.

Being well past the winter holidays, Linux 5.0-rc3 saw a ton of commit activity this week with a lot of bug/regression fixing. Though one "feature" worth pointing out that was merged this week was Nouveau now supporting the NVIDIA TU102, a.k.a. the RTX 2080 Ti and TITAN RTX granted in its mode-setting-only limited form. That complements the other NVIDIA Turing GPU support added to the Nouveau DRM driver back during the Linux 5.0 merge window to round-out the current latest-generation GeForce RTX 2000 series graphics cards.

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Solving the Year 2038 problem in the Linux kernel

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Linux

Because of the way time is represented in Linux, a signed 32-bit number can't support times beyond January 19, 2038 after 3:14:07 UTC. This Year 2038 (Y2038 or Y2K38) problem is about the time data type representation. The solution is to use 64-bit timestamps.

I started working on the problem while working as an Outreachy intern for kernel developer Arnd Bergmann. Outreachy is a benevolent program that helps new programmers get into kernel development. The mentors for the kernel projects are usually experienced kernel developers like Arnd.

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Booting Linux faster

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Linux

Of all the computers I've ever owned or used, the one that booted the quickest was from the 1980s; by the time your hand moved from the power switch to the keyboard, the BASIC interpreter was ready for your commands. Modern computers take anywhere from 15 seconds for a laptop to minutes for a small home server to boot. Why is there such a difference in boot times?

A microcomputer from the 1980s that booted straight to a BASIC prompt had a very simple CPU that started fetching and executing instructions from a memory address immediately upon getting power. Since these systems had BASIC in ROM, there was no loading time—you got to the BASIC prompt really quickly. More complex systems of that same era, such as the IBM PC or Macintosh, took a significant time to boot (~30 seconds), although this was mostly due to having to read the operating system (OS) off a floppy disk. Only a handful of seconds were spent in firmware before being able to load an OS.

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Complete Guide on How to Dual Boot Ubuntu and Windows

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Linux

Installing Ubuntu and other Linux OS as dual boot is difficult in pre-installed Windows Laptops due to certain features and restrictions. Secure boot, fast boot, SATA AHCI modes – all these options makes it bit complicated to make a system dual boot with Windows 10 and Ubuntu, specially for the general users.

This guide will help you to install Windows 10 and Ubuntu as a dualboot in a system.

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Kernel: Klibc, TEO, Z-Wave

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Linux
  • Klibc Sees Its First New Release In Five Years

    Klibc has seen some new activity recently and that has resulted in the first new release to this minimal standard C library subset in a half-decade.

    Klibc 2.0.5 was released this week by Ben Hutchings following a number of commits. The previous Klibc 2.0.4 version was released in July of 2014 and since then has only been sporadic work to this library. The Klibc C library subset is principally used for early in the Linux kernel boot process / initramfs.

  • The New "TEO" CPU Idle Governor For Tickless Systems Queued Ahead Of Linux 5.1

    The new "Timer Events Oriented" (TEO) governor in development over recent months by Intel developer Rafael Wysocki is poised to land with the Linux 5.1 kernel cycle.

    The TEO governor for the CPUIdle framework is designed to be more ideal for tickless systems in more appropriately picking the best C-state for the processor/system. TEO tries to pick the deepest idle state for the system's expected conditions.

  • There's Early Stage Work Exploring Z-Wave Linux Kernel Drivers

    Z-Wave is the incredibly common wireless communication protocol at the backbone of many home automation systems. To date there hasn't been any in-kernel Z-Wave Linux kernel drivers for this low-energy mesh network standard, but a SUSE developer has prototyped an initial driver and currently exploring the in-kernel possibilities, including what could end up being a Z-Wave subsystem.

New Releases: Kodachi 5.8, Tails RC, HardenedBSD Stable, KookBook 0.2.0

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GNU
Linux
BSD
  • Kodachi 5.8 The Secure OS

    Linux Kodachi operating system is based on Debian 9.5 / Ubuntu 18.04 it will provide you with a secure, anti-forensic, and anonymous operating system considering all features that a person who is concerned about privacy would need to have in order to be secure.
    Kodachi is very easy to use all you have to do is boot it up on your PC via USB drive then you should have a fully running operating system with established VPN connection + Connection established + service running. No setup or knowledge is required from your side we do it all for you. The entire OS is functional from your temporary memory RAM so once you shut it down no trace is left behind all your activities are wiped out.
    Kodachi is a live operating system that you can start on almost any computer from a DVD, USB stick, or SD card. It aims at preserving your privacy and anonymity, and helps you to:

  • Call for testing: [Tails] 3.12~rc1

    You can help Tails! The first release candidate for the upcoming version 3.12 is out. We are very excited and cannot wait to hear what you think about it, especially the new simplified USB installation method (see below). Smile

  • Stable release: HardenedBSD-stable 12-STABLE v1200058.2
  • KookBook 0.2.0 available – now manage your cooking recipes better

    Some people have started talking about maybe translation of the interface. I might look into that in the future.

    And I wouldn’t be sad if some icon artists provided me with a icon slightly better than the knife I drew. Feel free to contact me if that’s the case.

    Happy kooking!

Livepatching With Linux 5.1 To Support Atomic Replace & Cumulative Patches

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Linux
Security

With the Linux 5.1 kernel cycle that should get underway in just over one month's time, there will now be the long in development work (it's been through 15+ rounds of public code review!) for supporting atomic replace and cumulative patches.

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