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Thunderbolt Is Seeing A Lot Of Improvements For Linux 5.2

Filed under
Linux

Adding to the excitement of the Linux 5.2 kernel changes are a lot of Thunderbolt improvements expected to be introduced in this next kernel cycle.

Mika Westerberg of Intel has been working on a lot of Thunderbolt connectivity improvements destined for Linux 5.2 and in recent days has begun staging this work in the thunderbolt-next tree ahead of the Linux 5.2 kernel merge window opening in May.

Read more

Video/Audio: Manjaro 18.0 Deepin Edition, Open Source Security Podcast, This Week in Linux, Linux Gaming News Punch, Linux Action News, GNU World Order and Talk Python to Me

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • What’s New in Manjaro 18.0 Deepin Desktop Edition

    Manjaro 18.0 Deepin Edition is official Manjaro Linux flavour with Deepin Desktop Environment 15.8 as default desktop environment includes several deepin applications a free open source software.

    Manjaro 18.0 Deepin Edition is powered by the latest Long-Term Support of Linux Kernel 4.19, include pamac version 7.3. in manjaro 18.0, The Manjaro Settings Manager (MSM) now provides an easy-to-use graphical interface for installing and removing the many series of kernels. At the time of this release, eight kernel-series are available directly from manjaro binary repositories, from 3.16 series to the latest 4.19 release.

  • Open Source Security Podcast: Episode 142 - Hypothetical security: what if you find a USB flash drive?

    Josh and Kurt talk about what one could do if you find a USB drive. The context is based on the story where the Secret Service was rumored to have plugged a malicious USB drive into a computer. The purpose of discussion is to explore how to handle a situation like this in the real world. We end the episode with a fantastic comparison of swim safety and security.

  • Episode 64 | This Week in Linux

    On this episode of This Week in Linux, we got a lot of releases week. Ubuntu and all of the Flavours have released 19.04 versions along with an interesting update from the Ubuntu derivative Pop!_OS. The KDE Community announced the availability of a bunch of new versions of various KDE Applications.

  • Linux Gaming News Punch - Episode 9

    Coming in hot (please save me from this heat) is the ninth episode of the Linux Gaming News Punch, your weekly round-up of some interesting bits of news.

    For regular readers, as always this might not be too helpful but for those who don't visit too often this should help keep you updated.

  • Linux Action News 102

    Ubuntu 19.04 is released we share our take, OpenSSH has an important release, and Mozilla brings Python to the browser.

    Also WebThings is launched and we think it might have a shot.

  • GNU World Order 13x17
  • Talk Python to Me: #208 Packaging, Making the most of PyCon, and more

    Are you going to PyCon (or a similar conference)? Join me and Kenneth Retiz as we discuss how to make the most of PyCon and what makes it special for each of us.

Linux v5.1-rc6

Filed under
Linux

It's Easter Sunday here, but I don't let little things like random
major religious holidays interrupt my kernel development workflow. The
occasional scuba trip? Sure. But everybody sitting around eating
traditional foods? No. You have to have priorities. There's only so
much memma you can eat even if your wife had to make it from scratch
because nobody eats that stuff in the US.

Anyway, rc6 is actually larger than I would have liked, which made me
go back and look at history, and for some reason that's not all that
unusual. We recently had similar rc6 bumps in both 4.18 and 5.0.

So I'm not going to worry about it. I think it's just random timing of
pull requests, and almost certainly at least partly due to the
networking pull request in here (with just over a third of the changes
being networking-related, either in drivers or core networking).

Read more

Also: Linux 5.1-rc6 Kernel Released In Linus Torvalds' Easter Day Message

Using Ksplice To Detect Exploit Attempts

Filed under
Linux
Security
HowTos

Ksplice is a very cool technology. Ksplice allows you to patch important security updates to your system without a reboot. The in-memory code is patched as well as on-disk components, closing all the gaps for a security vulnerability. All the while, your applications keep running.

A new feature of Ksplice is Known Exploit Detection. When you patch your system with Ksplice, not only is the security vulnerability closed, but also tripwires are laid down for privilege escalation vulnerabilities. If an attacker attempts to exploit a CVE you’ve patched, Ksplice notifies you.

Ksplice is both protecting your system and alerting you to suspicious activity. Very cool.

Read more

Also: Oracle's Ksplice Live Kernel Patching Picks Up Known Exploit Detection

A Set Of Obscure Drivers Out-Of-Tree Since Linux 2.x Will See Mainline For Linux 5.2

Filed under
Linux

Should you have any Daktronics scoreboards, video displays, or digital billboards, mainline Linux kernel support appears to be in the works.

While shielded off by Kconfig build switches and not enabled by default, what some will surely point to the growing size of the Linux kernel and its laissez faire approach to accepting new drivers, a set of drivers that have been out-of-tree since the Linux 2.x kernel days are now on their way to the kernel's staging area with Linux 5.2. Not only that, but the code quality is admittedly less than stellar, hence the staging route.

Read more

Also: Intel i40e Driver Supporting Dynamic Device Personalization With Linux 5.2

Linux Foundation: 'Networking Superpowers' and Zephyr

Filed under
Linux
OSS
  • The Linux Foundation And Its Networking Superpowers

    I’ve written before about the Linux Foundation and the power of open, standards-based networking. Open source is having a significant impact in both the enterprise and with carriers around the globe. It’s also rubbing off on companies such as Cisco Systems, who are embracing a design philosophy that no longer locks customers into a specific networking stack. I recently had the opportunity to attend both the Open Source Leadership Summit (OSLS) in Half Moon Bay and the Open Network Summit (ONS) in San Jose. I would like to share some of my thoughts and insights from both events.

  • The Zephyr Project Announces Major Technical Milestone with New Long Term Support Code Release

    The Zephyr™ Project, an open source project at the Linux Foundation that aims to build a secure and flexible real-time operating system (RTOS) for the Internet of Things (IoT), today announced a technical milestone with the first Long Term Support (LTS) release. The Zephyr 1.14 LTS release, which has been developed by the diverse Zephyr community of almost 500 contributors, will offer vendors a customizable operating system that supports product longevity, security and interoperability.

The NULL TTY Driver Is Coming To The Linux 5.2 Kernel

Filed under
Linux

While initially some questions were raised over the usefulness and practicality of this driver when it was first proposed on the kernel mailing list, the NULL TTY driver is set to make its maiden voyage to mainline with the upcoming Linux 5.2 kernel cycle.

The NULL TTY driver is intended for use-cases where no console driver is present/enabled as intended or otherwise. For init scripts and programs attempting to access /dev/console, it will error out while attempts like linking the console device to /dev/null will cause issues depending upon usage since it doesn't behave like a TTY.

Read more

Netrunner Rolling 2019.04 released

Filed under
GNU
Linux

The Netrunner Team is happy to announce the immediate availability of Netrunner Rolling 2019.04 – 64bit ISO.

Read more

NVIDIA on LInux

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
Hardware
  • NVIDIA 418.52.05 Linux Driver Brings Vulkan Ray-Tracing To Non-RTX GPUs

    As we've been expecting from NVIDIA's recent DXR ray-tracing support back-ported to Pascal/Volta GPUs, there's now a NVIDIA Linux driver beta that offers VK_NV_ray_tracing for pre-Turing graphics processors.

    The NVIDIA 418.52.05 beta driver released on Friday now officially supports the company's Vulkan ray-tracing extension going back to GeForce GTX 1000 "Pascal" graphics cards. The line-up going back to the GeForce GTX 1060, including the Volta-based Titan V and Turing GTX 1600 series now has the ability to utilize Vulkan-powered ray-tracing. This is nice for developers though for Linux end-users/gamers there isn't any significant available yet utilizing Vulkan ray-tracing besides a few code samples and some early engine work for allowing the functionality; most of the ray-tracing activity has been on the Windows side and focused on DirectX 12, but hopefully that will change.

  • NVIDIA Jetson Nano - Install Docker Compose

    In our last blogpost NVIDIA Jetson Nano Developer Kit - Introduction we digged into the brand-new NVIDIA Jetson Nano Developer Kit and we did found out, that Docker 18.06.1-CE is already pre-installed on this great ARM board.

  • NVIDIA Jetson Nano - Upgrade Docker Engine

    In our last blogposts about the NVIDIA Jetson Nano Developer Kit - Introduction and NVIDIA Jetson Nano - Install Docker Compose we digged into the brand-new NVIDIA Jetson Nano Developer Kit and we know, that Docker 18.06.1-CE is already installed, but…

Kernel: Linux 5.1 and Linux 5.2

Filed under
Linux
  • Linux 5.1 Picking Up Keyboard Mappings For Full-Screen, Toggle Display Keys

    Coming as a late addition to the Linux 5.1 kernel are some long overdue keyboard key mappings for different functionality.

    Linux Input subsystem maintainer Dmitry Torokhov sent in a pull request on Friday of input updates for Linux 5.1. Among the changes are adding of mapping for Expose/Overview, Keyboard Brightness Up/Down/Toggle, Full Screen, and Toggle Display keys within the kernel's generic HID driver.

  • Linux 5.2 Is Introducing The Fieldbus Subsystem

    A new subsystem queued for introduction in the upcoming Linux 5.2 cycle is the Fieldbus Subsystem, which is initially being added to the staging area of the kernel.

    This newest subsystem for the Linux kernel benefits industrial systems. Fieldbus is a set of network protocols for real-time distributed control of automated industrial systems. Fieldbus is used for connecting different systems/components/instruments within industrial environments. Fieldbus is used for connecting facilities ranging from manufacturing plants up to nuclear energy facilities.

  • Panfrost DRM Driver Being Added To Linux 5.2 For Midgard / Bifrost Graphics

    Not only is the longtime Lima DRM driver for Arm Mali 400/450 graphics set to finally premiere with the Linux 5.2 kernel, but the Panfrost DRM driver is also being mainlined for the newer Mali graphics hardware.

    The Panfrost DRM driver is set to be added to the Linux 5.2 kernel. Panfrost is the open-source, reverse-engineered DRM/KMS driver for Arm Mali Midgard and Bifrost graphics processors where as the Lima driver focuses on the 400/450 series.

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More in Tux Machines

Excellent Utilities: lnav – the log file navigator

This is the second in a new series highlighting best-of-breed utilities. We’ll be covering a wide range of utilities including tools that boost your productivity, help you manage your workflow, and lots more besides. For this article, we’ll put lnav under the spotlight. lnav is a curses-based utility for viewing and analyzing log files. The software is designed to extract useful information from log files, making it easy to perform advanced queries. Think of lnav as an enhanced log file viewer. For many years system and kernel logs were handled by a utility called syslogd. Most Linux-based operating systems have since moved to systemd, which has a journal. That’s a giant log file for the whole system. Various software and services write their log entries into systemd’s journalctl. lnav can consume the JSON version of journalctl’s output. And it supports a wide range of other log formats. For systems running systemd-journald, you can also use lnav as the pager. We included a couple of log analyzers in our Essential System Tools feature. And lnav wouldn’t be totally out of place in that feature. lnav is optimized for small-scale deployments. Read more

Android Leftovers

Today in Techrights

Video/Audio: Manjaro 18.0 Deepin Edition, Open Source Security Podcast, This Week in Linux, Linux Gaming News Punch, Linux Action News, GNU World Order and Talk Python to Me

  • What’s New in Manjaro 18.0 Deepin Desktop Edition
    Manjaro 18.0 Deepin Edition is official Manjaro Linux flavour with Deepin Desktop Environment 15.8 as default desktop environment includes several deepin applications a free open source software. Manjaro 18.0 Deepin Edition is powered by the latest Long-Term Support of Linux Kernel 4.19, include pamac version 7.3. in manjaro 18.0, The Manjaro Settings Manager (MSM) now provides an easy-to-use graphical interface for installing and removing the many series of kernels. At the time of this release, eight kernel-series are available directly from manjaro binary repositories, from 3.16 series to the latest 4.19 release.
  • Open Source Security Podcast: Episode 142 - Hypothetical security: what if you find a USB flash drive?
    Josh and Kurt talk about what one could do if you find a USB drive. The context is based on the story where the Secret Service was rumored to have plugged a malicious USB drive into a computer. The purpose of discussion is to explore how to handle a situation like this in the real world. We end the episode with a fantastic comparison of swim safety and security.
  • Episode 64 | This Week in Linux
    On this episode of This Week in Linux, we got a lot of releases week. Ubuntu and all of the Flavours have released 19.04 versions along with an interesting update from the Ubuntu derivative Pop!_OS. The KDE Community announced the availability of a bunch of new versions of various KDE Applications.
  • Linux Gaming News Punch - Episode 9
    Coming in hot (please save me from this heat) is the ninth episode of the Linux Gaming News Punch, your weekly round-up of some interesting bits of news. For regular readers, as always this might not be too helpful but for those who don't visit too often this should help keep you updated.
  • Linux Action News 102
    Ubuntu 19.04 is released we share our take, OpenSSH has an important release, and Mozilla brings Python to the browser. Also WebThings is launched and we think it might have a shot.
  • GNU World Order 13x17
  • Talk Python to Me: #208 Packaging, Making the most of PyCon, and more
    Are you going to PyCon (or a similar conference)? Join me and Kenneth Retiz as we discuss how to make the most of PyCon and what makes it special for each of us.