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CoC/Systemd Supremacy Over Linux Kernel

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Linux
  • New Linux Code of Conduct Revisions: CoC Committee Added Plus Interpretation & Mediator

    The Linux Code of Conduct introduced last month that ended up being quite contentious will see some revisions just ahead of the Linux 4.19 stable kernel release. Greg Kroah-Hartman has outlined the planned changes as well as a new Code of Conduct Interpretation document.

    In the weeks since the Linux kernel CoC was merged, various patches were proposed but none merged yet. It turns out Greg KH was working in private with various kernel maintainers/developers on addressing their feedback and trying to come up with solutions to the contentious issues in private.

  • Some kernel code-of-conduct refinements

    Greg Kroah-Hartman has posted a series of patches making some changes around the newly adopted code of conduct. In particular, it adds a new document describing how the code is to be interpreted in the kernel community.

  • Systemd Adds Feature To Fallback Automatically To Older Kernels On Failure

    Systemd's latest feature is the concept of "boot counting" that will track kernel boot attempts and failures as part of an automatic boot assessment. Ultimately this is to provide automatic fallback to older kernels should a newer kernel be consistently failing.

    The feature was crafted over the past few months by Lennart Poettering himself to provide a way when making use of systemd-boot on UEFI systems it can automatically fallback to an older kernel if a newer kernel is consistently causing problems. This is treated as an add-on to the Boot Loader Specification. The systemd boot assessment is designed that it could also be used by non-UEFI systems and other boot platforms.

A Look At The Many Features On The Table For The Upcoming Linux 4.20~5.0 Kernel

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Linux

If all goes as planned, tomorrow will mark the availability of the Linux 4.19 stable kernel. That is also expected to mark the return of Linus Torvalds from his retreat where he was working on his empathy skills and politeness. The 4.19 stable release will then kick off the merge window for the next kernel cycle.

It's still not set in stone yet whether the next kernel release will be Linux 4.20 or Linux 5.0. Linus Torvalds previously communicated -- and what he did in going from Linux 3.19 to 4.0 -- was that when otherwise hitting the x.20 release is time to bump the major kernel version number. So it's likely the next kernel cycle will be Linux 5.0, but we'll see if the new-and-improved Torvalds has different feelings now over the versioning scheme.

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Stable kernels 4.18.16, 4.14.78, 4.9.135 and 4.4.162

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Linux

Mostly Hotly Sought-After Linux Skills

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GNU
Linux

The 2018 Open Source Technology Jobs Report shows rapid growth in the demand for open source technical talent, with Linux skills a must-have requirement for entry-level positions.

The seventh annual report from The Linux Foundation and Dice, released Wednesday, identifies Linux coding as the most sought-after open source skill. Linux-based container technology is a close second.

The report provides an overview of open source career trends, factors motivating professionals in the industry, and ways employers attract and retain qualified talent. As with the last two open source jobs reports, the focus this year is on all aspects of open source software and is not limited to Linux.

This year's report features data from more than 750 hiring managers at corporations, small and medium businesses, and government organizations and staffing agencies across the globe. It is based on responses from more than 6,500 open source professionals worldwide.

Linux skills rank as the most sought-after skills in the 2018 report, with 80 percent of hiring managers looking for tech professionals with Linux expertise.

Linux is required knowledge for most entry-level open source careers, likely due to the strong popularity of cloud and container technologies, as well as DevOps practices, all of which typically are based on Linux, according to the report.

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Desktop GNU/Linux: Chromebooks, LG, and 'World Domination'

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GNU
Linux
  • Google Will Improve Linux in Chrome OS with Folder Sharing and More
  • LG Gram Laptops To Be Better Supported By The Next Linux Kernel

    While LG isn't often thought of as a laptop manufacturer, their Gram laptop line-up has recently been making some waves. The LG Gram laptops are powered by Intel Core CPUs and are designed to be slim and sleek yet durable. With the next Linux kernel (4.20~5.0), they should be better supported should you want to wipe the default Microsoft Windows installation.

  • When the Problem Is the Story

    That's because Linux has achieved the world domination it longed for in the early years.

    Yes, Linus as a character got interesting for a few minutes last month (top results in a Google News search for "Linus Torvalds" range from 22 to 29 days old), but that story is too stale to be interesting now, even though the issues around it still matter.

    And that's my point here. Lots of subjects matter that stories do a lousy job of telling.

    But to journalism, and to the human beings journalism addresses, stories matter more than anything. Stories are clearly the base format of human interest.

Hacker friendly LapPi laptop kit runs on Raspberry Pi 3B+

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GNU
Linux
Hardware

SB Components is Kickstartering a Raspberry Pi based “LapPi” laptop kit with 7- or 5-inch screens, keyboard, camera, speakers, and 3800mAh battery, starting at $220 with an RPi 3B+ or $178 without.

SB Components has successfully funded its DIY LapPi kit on Kickstarter, and packages are available through Nov. 10 with December delivery. The company is known for its PiTalk smartphone and other Raspberry Pi add-on kits, which are available as options.

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Is New Ubuntu 18.10 Worth Installing?

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Linux

The new Ubuntu release "Cosmic Cuttlefish" has hit the OS market after 6 months of development. I've been using it since it came out and now here is what I have to say about it. In this article, I'll talk about the new things it brings in and also if it's the release worth upgrading to. So let's go.

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Suddenly Linux runs in Android

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Android
GNU
Linux

Yes, Android is based on a modified version of the Linux kernel. But once you’ve got Android running, you can utilize this app to get Linux running inside Android. But why, you might be asking – why would you want to do that? If you have to ask, you might just want to turn back now. With this app, users are able to run Debian or Ubuntu, games like Adventure or Zork, and Math systems like Gnuplot, Octave, and R.

UserLand allows one Session at a time and can also monitor filesystems. If you’re looking for a graphical interface, and not just a command line system, you might want to take a peek at the operating system Android. In other words: This is mostly just for fun, and a sort of proof of concept – but it has so much potential!

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Linux Devices: ARM/Linux in Servers and Embedded, Chromecast

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Linux
Hardware

Love Microsoft Teams? Love Linux? Then you won't love this

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GNU
Linux
Microsoft

Microsoft loves Linux. Unless you are a Linux user who happens to want to use Teams. In that case, you probably aren’t feeling the love quite so much.

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More in Tux Machines

Graphics: NVIDIA, Kazan, Sway and Panfrost

  • NVIDIA Developers Express Interest In Helping Out libc++/libstdc++ Parallel Algorithms
    NVIDIA developers have expressed interest in helping the open-source GCC libstdc++ and LLVM Clang libc++ standard libraries in bringing up support for the standardized parallel algorithms. C++17 brings parallelized versions for some of the algorithms exposed by the C++ standard library, but sadly GCC's libstdc++ and LLVM's libc++ do not yet support these parallel algorithms while the rest of their C++17 support is in great shape. Going back over a year Intel has been interested in contributing parallel support code to these C++ standard libraries that could be shared by both projects. The Intel path builds in abstractions for supporting different underlying thread/parallelism APIs.
  • The Rust-Written Kazan Vulkan Driver Lights Up Its Shader Compiler
    This week the Kazan project (formerly known as "Vulkan-CPU") celebrated a small but important milestone in its trek to having a CPU-based Vulkan software implementation. As a refresher, Kazan is the project born as Vulkan-CPU during the 2017 Google Summer of Code. The work was started by student developer Jacob Lifshay and he made good progress last summer on the foundation of the project and continued contributing past the conclusion of that Google-funded program. By the end of the summer he was able to run some simple Vulkan compute tests. He also renamed Vulkan-CPU to Kazan (Japanese for "volcano").
  • Sway 1.0 Beta Released - Offers 100% Compatibility With i3 Window Manager
    The Sway Wayland compositor inspired by X11's i3 window manager is now up to its beta ahead of the big 1.0 release. Sway 1.0 Beta offers "100%" compatibility with the i3 window manager. The Sway 1.0 release has also been working on many other changes including improved window handling, multi-GPU support, virtual keyboard protocol, real-time video capture, tablet support, and many other changes.
  • Panfrost Open-Source GPU Driver Continues Advancing For Mali GPUs
    The Panfrost open-source, community-driven, reverse-engineered graphics driver for ARM Mali graphics processors continues panning out pretty well. Alyssa Rosenzweig has provided an update this weekend on the state of Panfrost for open-source Mali 3D support. The developers involved have been working out some texture issues, various OpenGL / GLES issues around GLMark2, and support now for running Wayland's Weston reference compositor.

Android Leftovers

The Performance & Power Efficiency Of The Core i7 990X vs. Core i9 9900K

With my initial Core i9 9900K benchmarks out there following Friday's embargo expiration, for some weekend benchmarking fun I decided to pull out the old Core i7 990X to see how it compares to the new 9900K... The Gulftown and Coffeelake processors were compared not only on raw performance but also overall power consumption and performance-per-Watt. The Core i7 990X was the Extreme Edition processor back from 2011 codenamed "Gulftown" (Westmere microarchitecture), the 32nm generation before Sandy Bridge. Granted the announced but not yet released Core i9 9900X X-Series CPU will be more akin for comparison to the 990X, and I will at such time that it is available, but just for some extra benchmark runs over the weekend I was curious to see how the 990X and 9900K compare... Read more

Linux and systemd updates, with Plasma 5.13.5, Applications 18.08.1 and Frameworks 5.50 by KDE now available to all Chakra users

This time we have been a bit late, as many of our contributors were busy over the last couple of months, but we hope we can soon get back to normal delivery times. :blush: Better late than never though, so we are happy to inform you that on your next system upgrade you will receive newer versions of KDE’s Plasma, Applications and Frameworks, in addition to updates to important packages such as the linux kernel and systemd. The latest Plasma 5.14 2 series should follow soon. Read more