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New Devices With Defective Intel Chips and Linux Support

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
  • Linux-friendly embedded computer runs on Apollo Lake power

    Axiomtek has released a rugged, Ubuntu-ready “eBOX627-312-FL” embedded PC with a dual-core Celeron N3350, 2x GbE, 6x USB, and 4x serial ports plus mini-PCIe, HDMI, SATA, and “Flexible I/O.”

  • EPIC board boasts 4x GbE ports and PCIe x4

    Aaeon is rolling out a new EPIC form-factor “EPIC-KBS9” SBC with 6th or 7th Gen Core S-series chips, 4x GbE ports, up to 32GB DDR3, and mini-PCIe and PCIe x4 expansion.

    Aaeon’s EPIC-KBS9 follows two other EPIC-KBS SBCs to support Intel’s 6th “Skylake” or 7th “Kaby Lake” generation S-Series processors: the EPIC-KBS7, which emphasized real-world ports, and last month’s EPIC-KBS8, which is a bit more feature rich but with fewer coastline ports. Unlike these earlier models, the KBS9 offers 4x GbE ports, up to 32GB DDR4-2133, and a full-size PCIe x4 slot, which supports NVMe storage.

Kernel: Linux 4.19 and Vega 20 PowerPlay

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Linux
  • Power Management Updates Land In The Linux 4.19 Kernel

    Intel's Rafael Wysocki has submitted the ACPI and power management updates today for the Linux 4.19 kernel which were subsequently merged by Linus Torvalds.

  • Linux 4.19 Git Contains a lot of Performance Impacting Spectre Mitigation Updates

    Another round of commits regarding anti-Spectre security have landed up in the Linux 4.19 kernel git tree, which may have possible performance impacts for the kernel.

    While Spectre is still only a somewhat theoretical threat, as its entirely too slow to be used in a serious attack, many folks are taking its future potential quite seriously and arming up against it.

  • Linux 4.19 Kernel to Receive a Ton of Audio Hardware Updates for Improved Linux Sound Capabilities

    Linux audiophiles may have something to rejoice about, as a recent pull request from SUSE’s Takashi Iwai focuses on a plethora of sound subsystem updates for the Linux 4.19 kernel, including a lot of latest hardware support and overall improvements for Linux’s audio capabilities.

  • Updated Vega 20 Open-Source Driver Patches Posted, Including PSP & PowerPlay Support

    Back in May AMD posted initial open-source "Vega 20" patches and support for that yet-to-launch graphics processor was subsequently merged for the Linux 4.18 kernel. More of the Vega 20 AMDGPU kernel driver enablement has now been posted.

    This latest 69,910 lines of code -- before fretting, most of that is auto-generated header files for the GPU -- notably adds PSP (Platform Security Processor) and SMU (System Management Unit) for Vega 20. With the SMU enablement code, it's also now wired in to enable Vega 20 PowerPlay support as well as related power/clocking-functionality like OverDrive overclocking is also available.

Kernel: NSA Code/Algorithm in Linux, Performance Superiority Over Windows, and Linux Foundation News

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Linux
  • Linux 4.18 brings support for Vega M, Volta GV100 and, er, SPECK

    AFTER A WEEK'S DELAY, Linux kernel 4.18 stable has arrived.

    Announcing the release on Sunday, head of Linuxing Linus Torvalds said: "One week late(r) and here we are - 4.18 is out there. It was a very calm week, and arguably I could just have released on schedule last week, but we did have some minor updates."

    One notable change is that there's been a lot of code ditched - around 100,000 lines of obsolete code has been slashed.

  • The AMD Threadripper 2990WX shows even higher numbers when benchmarked on Linux

    Phoronix has done a performance comparison of the AMD Threadripper 2990WX in Windows 10 Pro and Linux and the results show Threadripper numbers significantly lower under Windows 10 Pro than in Linux. In some tests such as 7-Zip Compression, the Threadripper 2990WX posted almost 58% higher scores in Linux compared to Windows 10 Pro implying that Linux is a better OS of choice when testing high core count CPUs.

  • Diversity Empowerment Summit Highlights Importance of Allies

    Diversity and inclusion are hot topics as projects compete to attract more talent to power development efforts now as well as build their ranks to carry the projects into the future. The Diversity Empowerment Summit co-located with Open Source Summit coming up in Vancouver August 29-31, will offer key insights to help your project succeed in these endeavors.

    Although adoption of diversity and inclusion policies is generally seen as simply the right thing to do, finding good paths to building and implementing such policies within existing community cultures continues to be challenging. The Diversity Empowerment Summit, however, provides hard insights, new ideas, and proven examples to help open source professionals navigate this journey.

  • Hollywood rolls out red carpet for open source developers

    The launch of the ASWF is almost like creating a GitHub for the developers behind motion pictures, but open source is nothing new to the film industry. It dates back about 20 years, Andy Maltz, managing director of the Science and Technology Council at the Academy, told CIO Dive.

    Film "is the only art form that has a fundamental reliance on technology," he said. The film industry's use of tech dates back to photochemical technologies and proceeds to today's digital image capture.

Latest Speculative Execution 'Bug' (Chip Defect)

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
Security
  • L1 Terminal Fault - The Latest Speculative Execution Side Channel Attack

    Details are still light but a new vulnerability is coming out called the L1 Terminal Fault. It's been described as a "train-wreck" and is another big deal in the security space as the latest speculative side-channel attack vector.

    The CVEs are CVE-2018-3615, CVE-2018-3620, and CVE-2018-3646 but as of writing they have not been made public yet. I just noticed the code hitting the mainline Linux kernel to this "L1TF - L1 Terminal Fault" vulnerability.

  • Ubuntu updates for L1 Terminal Fault vulnerabilities

    Today Intel announced a new side channel vulnerability known as L1 Terminal Fault. Raoul Strackx, Jo Van Bulck, Marina Minkin, Ofir Weisse, Daniel Genkin, Baris Kasikci, Frank Piessens, Mark Silberstein, Thomas F. Wenisch, Yuval Yarom, and researchers from Intel discovered that memory present in the L1 data cache of an Intel CPU core may be exposed to a malicious process that’s executing on the CPU core. Processors from other vendors are not known to be affected by L1TF.

  • Microsoft Patch Tuesday 17134.228 Enhances Battery Performance and Mitigates L1TF Vulnerability

Linux 4.19 (Next Release) Developments

Filed under
Linux
  • Big CIFS/SMB3 Improvements Head To Linux 4.19

    Linus Torvalds has merged a rather significant set of patches for improving the CIFS/SMB3 support in the mainline kernel.

    The SMB3/CIFS advanced network file-system support provides the VFS module supporting the SMB3 family of NAS protocols for dealing with Samba/Azure/etc. With Linux 4.19 a lot of new feature code has been merged.

  • New Sound Hardware Support & Other Improvements Playing In Linux 4.19

    SUSE's Takashi Iwai sent in the pull request this morning of the sound subsystem updates for the Linux 4.19 kernel and it includes a lot of new hardware support and other improvements for Linux's audio capabilities.

  • A Lot Of Spectre Changes Land In The Linux 4.19 Git Tree, Possible Performance Impact

    "The Speck [Spectre slang, not to be confused with the controversial NSA algo] brigade sadly provides yet another large set of patches destroying the perfomance which we carefully built and preserved," began the latest x86/pti pull request by kernel maintainer Thomas Gleixner.

Git Basics - Git Series Part 1

Filed under
Linux

This series will explain the purpose of git, how to clone GitHub repository, GitLab repository, or otherwise. How to view the changelog and how to revert to an older version of the repository, add and remove files, commit changes, update remote repositories, fetch most recent versions of a repo, and more. GUI front-ends will also be covered, as well as troubleshooting and how typical IDEs will handle source code files belonging to a git repo.

Read more

Run a Linux Terminal on Cheap E-Ink Displays

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

If you haven’t kept up with the world of e-ink displays, here’s some good news: they are pretty cheap now. For as little as $15 you can get a small e-ink display that has good enough performance and contrast to actually do something useful. There’s only one problem: figuring out how to drive them in your project.

Tired of seeing nothing but wiring diagrams and sample code when it came to actually putting these e-ink modules to use, [Jouko Strömmer] decided to try his hand at creating a turn-key application for these gorgeous little displays. The result is PaperTTY, a Python program that allows the user to open up a fully functional Linux virtual terminal on an e-ink display.

Read more

Also: Open Sourcing Martian Engineering

Linux 4.19 Work and Linux Foundation Expansion

Filed under
Linux
  • EXT4 & XFS File-System Updates Submitted For Linux 4.19

    The pull requests updating the XFS and EXT4 file-system driver code have been sent in for the recently started Linux 4.19 kernel merge window.

    On the EXT4 file-system front, the documentation on the project's Wiki has been converted into documentation files within the kernel tree. Additionally, there is now 64-bit timestamp support for EXT4's superblock fields, a Spectre gadget fix, hardening against maliciously corrupted file-systems, and various other bug fixes and code improvements.

  • Linux 4.19 Will Fend Off Stack Attacks With STACKLEAK Plugin

    As expected, Linux 4.19 is getting STACKLEAK as a GCC plug-in for the Linux kernel that will fend off various form of stack attacks.

    STACKLEAK is ported from the last open-source code of the GrSecurity/PaX modified kernel and wipes out the kernel stack before returning from system calls.

  • Open Source cleaning up at the Oscars

    Over the last 25 years, software, and particularly open source software (OSS), has played an increasingly important role in the most successful movies of our time.

    Now this contribution is set to grow, boosted by the introduction on Friday, of the Academy Software Foundation (ASWF), a joint venture of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences - the organisation behind the annual Oscar awards and the Linux Foundation.

    This follows a recently concluded two-year investigation by the Academy which found that more than 80% of the motion picture industry uses OSS, particularly for animation and visual effects.

  • AMPAS, Linux Foundation Launch Academy Software Foundation

    “Developers and engineers across the industry are constantly working to find new ways to bring images to life, and open source enables them to start with a solid foundation while focusing on solving unique, creative challenges rather than reinventing the wheel,” said Rob Bredow, SVP, Executive Creative Director and Head of Industrial Light & Magic and Member of the Academy’s Science and Technology Council, Open Source Investigation Committee. “We are very excited to launch the Academy Software Foundation and provide a home for open source developers to collaborate, regardless of where they work, and share best practices which we believe will drive innovation across the industry.”

  • The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences and The Linux Foundation Launched the Academy Software Foundation, Linux 4.18 and GNU Linux-libre 4.18-gnu Kernels Are Out, DXVK 0.65 Released and Canonical Live Patch Update

    The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences and The Linux Foundation launched the Academy Software Foundation late last week. The ASF's mission is to "increase the quality and quantity of contributions to the content creation industry's open source software base; to provide a neutral forum to coordinate cross-project efforts; to provide a common build and test infrastructure; and to provide individuals and organizations a clear path to participation in advancing our open source ecosystem". Interested developers can sign up to join the mailing list here.

Automating backups on a Raspberry Pi NAS

Filed under
Linux
HowTos

In the first part of this three-part series using a Raspberry Pi for network-attached storage (NAS), we covered the fundamentals of the NAS setup, attached two 1TB hard drives (one for data and one for backups), and mounted the data drive on a remote device via the network filesystem (NFS). In part two, we will look at automating backups. Automated backups allow you to continually secure your data and recover from a hardware defect or accidental file removal.

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5 open source strategy and simulation games for Linux

Filed under
Linux
OSS
Gaming

Gaming has traditionally been one of Linux's weak points. That has changed somewhat in recent years thanks to Steam, GOG, and other efforts to bring commercial games to multiple operating systems, but those games are often not open source. Sure, the games can be played on an open source operating system, but that is not good enough for an open source purist.

So, can someone who only uses free and open source software find games that are polished enough to present a solid gaming experience without compromising their open source ideals? Absolutely. While open source games are unlikely ever to rival some of the AAA commercial games developed with massive budgets, there are plenty of open source games, in many genres, that are fun to play and can be installed from the repositories of most major Linux distributions. Even if a particular game is not packaged for a particular distribution, it is usually easy to download the game from the project's website to install and play it.

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Amiga Enthusiast Gets Quake Running On Killer NIC PowerPC CPU Core

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New Devices With Defective Intel Chips and Linux Support

  • Linux-friendly embedded computer runs on Apollo Lake power
    Axiomtek has released a rugged, Ubuntu-ready “eBOX627-312-FL” embedded PC with a dual-core Celeron N3350, 2x GbE, 6x USB, and 4x serial ports plus mini-PCIe, HDMI, SATA, and “Flexible I/O.”
  • EPIC board boasts 4x GbE ports and PCIe x4
    Aaeon is rolling out a new EPIC form-factor “EPIC-KBS9” SBC with 6th or 7th Gen Core S-series chips, 4x GbE ports, up to 32GB DDR3, and mini-PCIe and PCIe x4 expansion. Aaeon’s EPIC-KBS9 follows two other EPIC-KBS SBCs to support Intel’s 6th “Skylake” or 7th “Kaby Lake” generation S-Series processors: the EPIC-KBS7, which emphasized real-world ports, and last month’s EPIC-KBS8, which is a bit more feature rich but with fewer coastline ports. Unlike these earlier models, the KBS9 offers 4x GbE ports, up to 32GB DDR4-2133, and a full-size PCIe x4 slot, which supports NVMe storage.

'Foreshadow' Coverage